ZINK : William Harrel – Journalist

Review of the Sprocket 2nd Edition at PCMag

  • PROS

    Impressive print quality. Lower price and running costs than original Sprocket. Expressive colors. Sprocket App has lots of new functionality. Nascent augmented-reality aspects.

  • CONS

    A few features (notably, multi-user connections and print queue) are under-developed.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    HP’s Sprocket 2nd Edition portable photo printer costs less than the original and stands out with its unique design and quirky AR angle. But most impressive is the improved print quality.

Get Dieter and Helmut out of your head: You’re thinking of the wrong Sprockets. The HP Sprocket 2nd Edition ($129.99), a pocket-size portable snapshot printer, is the company’s third by that name, replacing the popular original Sprocket reviewed in December 2016. Since then, we’ve tested similar models from Canon, Kodak, and Lifeprint, but we didn’t find one worthy of our Editors’ Choice nod until the HP Sprocket Plus came along in mid-2018. The Sprocket 2nd Edition’s beefed-up feature list, funky augmented-reality angle, and impressive output-quality overhaul represent big steps forward for this fun device. Our new Editors’ Choice, the HP Sprocket 2nd Edition ends its sibling’s short reign as PCMag’s top portable photo printer.

Read the entire review at PCMag



 

Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Decent print quality for a Zink-based model. Makes slightly larger prints than Sprocket predecessor. App is easy to set up and use.

  • CONS

    Can’t print from a PC. Running costs, like with most Zink printers, are a bit high.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    An update to HP’s popular Sprocket portable photo printer, the Sprocket Plus prints larger pics, and its software packs a wide range of effects. It’s the most versatile model of its kind.

The HP Sprocket Plus ($149.99) is an update to the HP Sprocket portable photo printer we reviewed late last year. This newer iteration prints 30 percent larger photos (they are 2.3 by 3.4 inches, versus the original’s 2 by 3 inches), and the quality is better, too. The Sprocket and Sprocket Plus aren’t unique; they compete with similar products from Canon, Kodak, Lifeprint, Polaroid, and a few others. While most of these pocket photo printers, in terms of print quality, speed, and running costs, are near equals, the slightly bigger prints and the new functionality in its app set the Sprocket Plus apart from the pack—enough to elevate it to our latest Editors’ Choice for portable photo printers.

Read the entire review at PCMag



Review of the Canon IVY Mini Photo Printer at PCMag.da

  • PROS 

    Good print quality for its class. Easy to set up and use. Tiling feature allows for bigger images and collages. Competitive running costs.

  • CONS

    Can’t print from a PC. Bluetooth is only connection option. Lacks support for Wi-Fi. No savings for buying paper in bulk.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    With on-par output quality, print speeds, and running costs for a Zink-based photo printer, the Canon IVY Mini is a solid portable model that churns out 2-by-3-inch prints.

Over the past few years, we’ve seen a surge of pocket photo printers that you operate solely from your smartphone or tablet. A few, notably the HP Sprocket Photo Printer and the Lifeprint 2×3 Hyperphoto Printer, have managed top ratings in PCMag reviews. Now, along comes Canon’s IVY Mini Photo Printer ($129.99), which, aside from a few set-apart print features, is essentially a “me-too” model. It prints as well as most of its competitors, and it comes with an easy-to-use app for printing, as well as for cropping and enhancing your photos. In our testing, though, little about the IVY stands out. It’s as good a choice as most of its competitors, assuming what you’re after are tiny, on-the-fly prints from a mobile device.

Read the entire review at PCMag