New ed2go Adobe Muse course announced

(Camarillo, CA – March 22, 2013) Journalist, author, and online course instructor William Harrel and eClasses (eClasses.org) have teamed up once again to announce a new online course. This time, the subject of the class will be Adobe’s new WYSIWYG (what you see is what you get) Website design app, Muse.

The first session starts on April 1, 2013 and you can sign up or get additional information here: Introduction to Adobe Muse.

Harrel teaches Website design and animation at over 3,000 colleges, universities, and other online outlets, and eClasses is one of the world’s largest and most successful online course publishers.


What is Adobe Muse?

Adobe® Muse™ software enables designers to create HTML websites for desktop and mobile devices, without writing code. Design web-standard sites, like you design print layouts. Use familiar features, hundreds of web fonts, and built-in tools to add interactivity.  Then, publish with the Adobe Business Catalyst® service and redeem site hosting support, or publish with any hosting provider. (Source: Adobe.com)


Course Overview

This new course, which is under development now, will be entitled: Websites without Coding with Adobe Muse, and will consist of six-week sessions (two lessons per week) covering the following material:

Lesson 1: Getting Started with Muse

  • Overview: Designing Websites in Muse
  • Plan Mode – Starting a Website in Muse
  • Design Mode – The Page Design Interface

Lesson 2 : Creating a Basic Site in Muse

  • Mastering Master Pages
  • Working with Boxes
  • Typography: Working with Text

Lesson 3: Using External Content with Muse

  • Using and Formatting Word Processor Text
  • External Graphics and Images
  • Digital Sound, Video, and other Media

Lesson 4: Working with Widgets

  • Creating Compositions
  • Web Forms
  • Making Menus

Lesson 5: More Widgets and Templates

  • Creating Expanding Panels
  • Slick Slideshows
  • Using Templates with Muse

Lesson 6: Using other CS6 Programs with Muse

  • Using Photoshop and Fireworks with Muse
  • Using Photoshop Buttons with Muse
  • Using Edge Animate with Muse

Lesson 7: Interactivity: Triggers and Targets

  • Making Mouse States
  • Interactivity Triggers
  • Page Navigation with Targets

Lesson 8: Creating Sites for Mobile Devices

  • Repurposing Existing Content
  • Formatting Content for Smartphones
  • Formatting Content for Tablets

Lesson 9: Stylizing Type with Typekit and Web Fonts

  • Decorative Type with Typekit
  • 3D Type and other Special Effects
  • Working with Web Fonts

Lesson 10: Advanced Web Design Techniques

  • Accommodating Flexible Browser Widths
  • Embedding Google Maps
  • Embedding HTML Code

 

Lesson 11: Working More Efficiently in Muse

  • Getting the Most from Master Pages
  • Sharing Content between Pages and Sites
  • Sharing Muse Content between Media Types

Lesson 12: Publishing Your Muse Websites

  • Publishing to Adobe Business Catalyst
  • CMS Integration on Adobe Business Catalyst
  • Publishing with FTP

Check back with us for updates and projected course release dates.

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How many times has a Web design client asked you, “Can I edit it myself?” Immediately you cringe, thinking about how hard it will be to train them to make small edits to their Website, and how easy it is for them to ruin your hard work. Well, if you use DreamWeaver and are willing to upgrade to CS4, Adobe has come up with a fairly good solution, Adobe InContext.

Changing text color from inside Internet Explorer

Changing text color from inside Internet Explorer

InContext allows you to define regions on a page within DreamWeaver that endusers and clients can then edit from Explorer or some other Web browser, and then save their edits back to the Web server. InContext is a bit of a hassle to setup-each site has to be registered at adobe.com-but once you’ve gone through all the setup steps, sure enough, the document can be edited from a browser. The best part is that only the regions you define as editable can be changed; the rest of the page is untouchable.

It works like this:

  • You define a region or regions on the page for InContext editing.
  • When you save and upload the page, DreamWeaver automatically creates 3 small files, 2 javascript files and an html file, and saves them in the Includes folder on the server.
  • You then go to the Adobe Website and register the site. If you haven’t registered a site before, you will also have register as an InContext administrator-a relatively quick and easy procedure. And, so far, it is free.
  • After you register the InContext site, you can then add users and send them invitations to edit the site using InContext. An email with instructions for accessing the InContext session from inside their browser is sent via email.
  • Now, when you or a user browse to that site and go to an editable page, all you have to do is hit Ctrl-E (Windows) or Command-E (Mac).
  • This starts the InContext session and the site can now be edited in the browser.

There are two tutorials on the Adobe Website describing this process. One for the DreamWeaver designer, or developer – http://www.adobe.com/devnet/dreamweaver/articles/getting_started_with_ice_dev.html

And one for the enduser, or “content editor” – http://www.adobe.com/devnet/dreamweaver/articles/getting_started_with_ice_eu_03.html

Depending on the role you choose on Adobe’s site for the enduser, they can make various types of edits, including:

  • Text formatting and style (the default)
  • Image insertion and management
  • Insertion and management of hyperlinks.

Pros of InContext
The best thing I can say about this solution is that it works and works fairly well. The enduser doesn’t need to have or know how to use DreamWeaver or any other Webpage design program. Nor do you need to teach your client (or employee) the intricacies of FTP and editing a page in a text editor, all the while praying that they don’t change the wrong things. Once up and running, it is pretty slick and works well.

Oh yeah, and did I mention it is free?

Cons of InContext
The three things I liked least about this solution is that: It is a bit time consuming to setup. It locks you and your client into the Adobe website and Adobe products, no matter what the future brings (I have been using Adobe products for years and don’t really see myself switching. However, I’d bet it would have been just as easy for Adobe to create javascripts that enabled InContext without registering on the Adobe Website. But then this would have made this solution relatively easy to use with any Webpage design program-it’s easy to understand why they wouldn’t want that.); Finally, InContext only works with the latest doctypes (i.e., HTML 4.01). If you have been designing sites as long as I have, you will have plenty with earlier doctypes. If so, you will have to change the doctype on every page you want to setup to use InContext.

You can find a good description of InContext on Adobe’s site at http://www.adobe.com/products/incontextediting/

An ongoing discussion of InContext can be found here: http://www.graphicrating.com/2008/10/27/adobe-incontext-editing/

Bill Harrel – www.williamharrel.com

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