Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Low price. Supports Wi-Fi and Ethernet networking, as well as lots of mobile and cloud options. Customizable 2.8-inch color touch screen. Fast scanning and text recognition. Highly accurate OCR.

  • CONS

    No disc in the box. Touch screen somewhat cramped.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Brother’s ADS-2700W is a fast, highly accurate document scanner that comes with Wi-Fi, Ethernet, and numerous mobile and cloud connectivity options for a very reasonable price.

A smaller, lower-capacity, and less-expensive sibling to the Editors’ Choice Brother ImageFormula ADS-3600W (Out of stock at Amazon), the Brother ADS-2700W Wireless High-Speed Desktop Document Scanner ($399.99) ($379.99 at Amazon) is a low- to-mid-volume document scanner designed for micro and small offices and workgroups. Comparable in price and speed to the Epson WorkForce ES-500W ($319.99 at Amazon), which, like the Brother models mentioned here, is networkable, the ADS-2700W is fast and highly accurate for the price. In addition, it comes with an easy-to-use color touch screen and the ability to scan to USB thumb drives, thereby making it an exceptional value, as well as our latest top pick for entry-level networkable document scanners.
See entire review at PCMag


Review of the Epson WorkForce ET-4750 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Excellent output quality. Very low running costs after initial investment. Ships with generous amount of ink. Supports Wi-Fi Direct mobile connectivity. Small and light.

  • CONS

    Slow for the price. High purchase price. Automatic document feeder (ADF) is not auto-duplexing. No NFC support.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson ET-4750 EcoTank AIO printer may be a bit slow, but it prints excellent quality documents and photos at a very low cost per print.

Depending on how much you use it, the Epson WorkForce ET-4750 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer ($499.99) ($399.99 at Amazon) is either a wise investment or a waste of money. Like the WorkForce ET-4550 (Check on Amazon at Amazon) before it, or its direct competitor, the Canon Pixma G4200 Wireless MegaTank All-in-One Printer (Check on Amazon at Amazon), the ET-4750 is a supertank, or bulk ink printer. Supertank all-in-one (AIO) printers are marketed under the pay-more-up-front-to-pay-less-for-ink-later model. Aside from the way you buy and feed it ink, though, the ET-4750 is roughly a pared-down equivalent to the Editors’ Choice Epson WorkForce Pro WF-4720.(Check on Amazon at Amazon) It’s slow and short on features for a $500 AIO, but it prints quite well, and the ongoing per-page price of ink is minuscule, making it an excellent choice for home-based or small offices or workgroups that need to print or copy from several hundred to a thousand or so pages each month.
Read the entire review at PCMag


  • PROS

    Reasonably fast. Excellent print quality. Strong paper expansion capacity. High-yield toner cartridge. Very low running costs. Strong security features.

  • CONS

    Expensive printer and add-ons. Fax, OCR, and Wi-Fi cost extra. ADF duplexer is not single-pass.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Ricoh MP 501SPF monochrome laser AIO comes with a wealth of top-drawer features and expansion options. It prints capably, fast, and at a very low cost per page, but the printer itself will cost you.

Designed for midsize to large offices and workgroups, the RicohBlack and White Laser Multifunction Printer ($3,499) ($2,076.48 at Amazon) means business—and then some. Out of the box it comes with a richer feature set and greater functionality than your average high-volume monochrome laser all-in-one (AIO), and if it doesn’t do what you want by default, rest assured, there’s an add-on that can.In addition to printing well, and fast, everything about the 501SPF—its huge monthly duty cycle, highly expandable high-capacity paper input, tablet-size touch screen control panel, 350GB hard drive, and incredibly low cost per page—screams high-volume. Even so, too many of the most useful and more common features, such as Wi-Fi, fax, and optical character recognition (OCR), are (often expensive) add-ons, given its lofty price, which is just enough to preclude it from gaining our Editors’ Choice nod. Aside from that, though, the 501SPF is a highly capable and sophisticated high-volume monochrome laser printer.
Read the entire review at PCMag


 

As we’ve noted before, there are a lot of single-function and multifunction, or all-in-one (AIO), monochrome laser printers in the world. Over the past year or so, we’ve looked at several from Brother, Canon, HP, Dell, Oki Data, Samsung, and Xerox, and haven’t come close to reviewing them all. And there are still more models from other manufacturers not listed above, one of them being a long-established maker of laser printers and other office equipment worldwide—Ricoh. Today’s review model, the $455-list Ricoh SP 377SFNwX Black and White Laser Multifunction Printer (Check on Amazon at Amazon) at Amazon), is the first of a few Ricoh machines that we’ll be reviewing soon.

Paying just under $500 usually gets you a midrange, medium-volume monochrome laser AIO. The 377SFNwX’s price positions it between Brother’s MFC-L5700DW  ($301.03 at Amazon) and Canon’s ImageClass D1550 ($489.37 at Amazon); however, the Ricoh’s 30,000-page maximum monthly duty cycle suggests that it’s less capable by several thousand pages than these and other closely priced monochrome laser AIOs, including the Brother MFC-L6800DW ($629.00 at Amazon) and Canon ImageClass D1520.($377.94 at Amazon) Unless, that is, you evaluate them from a different number, the recommended monthly volume, which in most cases is a much more relevant figure. The Ricoh model’s 5,800-page recommended volume is more than a couple of thousand pages higher than most of the other monochrome AIOs mentioned here.

Despite its lower duty cycle, as you’ll see in the Cost Per Page section later, the 377SFNwX delivers lower running costs than most other midrange monochrome laser AIOs, which, if you’re printing thousands of pages each month, is a very important consideration. Also important is how well the AIO prints. Although during our tests our Ricoh review unit churned out graphics and photos slightly darker than we like, its overall print quality is quite good, especially when printing text.

Ricoh SP 377SFNwX (Left Angled)

As you’ll see in the Design & Features section coming up next, the 377SFNwX is also significantly smaller and lighter than most of the AIOs mentioned here so far. In fact, its size is closer to that of an entry-level model, such as, say, Canon’s $300-list ImageClass MF249dw.($214.00 at Amazon) Even so, it comes with just about every production and convenience feature you can get on a laser AIO in this class, including an auto-duplexing automatic document feeder (ADF) and a plethora of standard and mobile connectivity methods.

Not as stylish as Canon’s latest round of monochrome lasers, nor as volume-capable and expandable as Brother’s current midrange black-and-white laser AIOs, the Ricoh 377SFNwX nevertheless has its charms, to the extent that if its overall print quality were just a wee bit better, it would have easily walked away with our Editors’ Choice nod. Otherwise, it is an ideal mid-volume workhorse for your small office’s or workgroup’s internal communications, as well as frontline situations, such as the front desks at doctors’ and dentists’ offices, auto repair shops, and anywhere else quick, short text documents are required.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper



 

Review of the Canon Pixma TS3120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One at PCMag

  • PROS

    Low price. Compact and light. Bluetooth 4.0 support. Good print quality overall.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder. Only two ink cartridges. Lacks SD card and USB thumb drive support. High cost per page. Maximum 5-by-7-inch photo output size. Slow document printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The budget-friendly Canon Pixma TS3120 prints text, graphics and photos well enough, but its low price also means having to forgo some convenient features.

The Canon Pixma TS3120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($79.99) ($66.61 at Amazon) is one of very few inkjet printers with the distinction of a sub-$80 list price (and its street price of $49.99 means that you can actually buy it for less than $50, making it all the more unique). Not only is this one of the least-expensive consumer-grade photo all-in one (AIO) printers we’ve reviewed recently, it’s also one of the smallest, slowest, and shortest on features. Like the HP DeskJet 3755, the TS3120 is designed for families and homes that do very little printing and copying—a sort of there-when-you-need-it device. In that role, it’s a lower-cost alternative to the Canon Pixma TS5020 or the significantly more-expensive Editors’ Choice Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless 
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One at PCMag

  • PROS

    Lightweight and compact. Two additional ink cartridges for higher-quality photos. Two paper input trays. SD card, Ethernet, and Bluetooth 4.0 support. Excellent print quality. Fast snapshot printing.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder. Lacks NFC and Wi-Fi Direct. Slow document printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Though it lacks an automatic document feeder, the six-ink Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One printer produces exceptional text, graphics, and photos.

The flagship model in Canon’s Pixma TS-series consumer-grade photo all-in-one (AIO) inkjet printers, the Canon Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($199) ($129.99 at Amazon) replaces the Pixma TS9020 ($54.95 at Amazon) we reviewed earlier this year. Like its sibling, the Pixma TS8020, ($77.98 at Amazon) a top pick, the TS9120 is a six-ink machine designed to print primarily photographs, and that it does quite well. It prints and copies documents well, too, but sluggishly, compared with its business-oriented counterparts, and it lacks an automatic document feeder (ADF). However, its outstanding output quality, larger display, and Ethernet support for just $20 more than the Canon TS8020 makes it well-deserving of our Editors’ Choice as a consumer-grade photo and occasional document printer for home and family use.
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Canon Pixma TS6120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One at PCMag

  • PROS

    Takes up little space. Five ink cartridges for higher-quality text and photos. Two paper-input trays. Bluetooth 4.0 support. Excellent print quality, especially photos. Prints photos fast.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder, SD card or USB thumb drive support. Lacks NFC and Wi-Fi Direct. Slow document printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Canon Pixma TS6120 prints exceptional text, graphics and photos, but an automatic document feeder, memory drive support, and lower running costs would make it more attractive.

Part of a recent debut of five new TS-series Pixmas, the Canon Pixma TS6120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($149.99) ($79.99  at Amazon) replaces the Pixma TS6020 as a low-volume photo-centric all-in-one (AIO) printer for family and home office use. Aside from the addition of Bluetooth and a few other small tweaks, the TS6120 isn’t much different from its predecessor. It looks and prints the same, and at the same speeds, for the same list price, which is about $50 less than the Editors’ Choice Canon Pixma TS9120. Like most consumer-grade photo printers in this price range, the TS6120 is slow, and it has no automatic document feeder (ADF). It prints quite well, though—especially photos—making it a sensible lower-cost alternative to the pricier and more-expensive-to-use Canon TS9120.
Read the entire review at PCMag

Editors' ChoicePROS

  • Excellent print quality. Light and compact. SD card slot. Ethernet support. Two black inks. Two paper input trays. 20-sheet ADF. XXL ink cartridges available.

  • CONS

    A little pricey. Somewhat high running costs.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    It may be a little pricey, but the Canon Pixma TR8520 all-in-one printer produces terrific text, graphics and photos, and it has a strong feature set.

Earlier this year, Canon replaced its outdated cube-shaped MG-series (consumer-grade photo) Pixma printers with new TS-series Pixma models. Meanwhile, the Pixma TR8520 Wireless Home Office All-in-One Printer ($199.99) ($139.99 at Amazon), one of two models in the Canon’s TR series (it has a slightly lower-end sibling, the soon-to-be-reviewed Pixma TR7520), edges out the past-its-prime MX-series (family and home-based office) Pixmas. Specifically, the TR8520 replaces the Editors’ Choice Pixma MX922.($84.99 at Amazon) The TR8520 all-in-one printer is smaller than the Canon MX922, redesigned in and out, and supports Bluetooth, making it our new top pick for family and home-based office, low-volume printing and copying.
Read the entire review at PCMag


My review of Epson Expression Photo XP-8500 Small-in-One at Computer ShopperWhen you stop and think about it, some of the things that our PCs, smartphones, and tablets allow us to do truly are amazing. Printing exquisite-looking photos on small, inexpensive inkjet printers is one of them. It’s not just having the ability to print photos that’s so awesome, though. What’s even more incredible is, when everything comes together just right—stunning content, taken in the right lighting, printed with a quality machine on premium photo paper—how striking the results can be.

It’s no wonder, then, that printing photos at home has become so popular, and that three of the top inkjet-printer makers—Canon, Epson, and HP—all offer machines tweaked and marketed as photo printers. If you choose the right one and feed it with the right ink, paper, and digital data, churning out masterpieces of your own isn’t particularly difficult, even if it costs a little more per photo than at Costco or the corner drug store.

You must start with the right printer, though. Today’s review unit, the $249.99-MSRP Epson Expression Photo XP-8500 Small-in-One ($199.99 at Amazon), may face some impressive competitors, but it’s got some fight in it. A newcomer to Epson’s established Small-in-One line of all-in-one (AIO) printers (in this case, it prints, copies, and scans), the XP-8500 has photo quality that’s among the best in its class.

Epson Expression Photo XP-8500 (Control Panel)

But that doesn’t necessarily make your printer-picking decision easy. During the past year, Canon has released a wave of highly capable photo-centric models in its Pixma TS- and Pixma G-series MegaTank lines, while HP has trotted out its Envy Photo 7855 (Check on Amazon at Amazon) and a couple of other Envy Photo models. And Epson’s own Expression Premium and Expression Photo brands boast some formidable photo printers of their own. (Prior to the XP-8500, it had been a while since we’d seen a new Expression Photo model.)

The XP-8500 is a six-ink printer; the additional inks help increase detail and extend the printer’s color range. In just the six-ink category alone, you will find the Canon Pixma TS9020 ($49.99 at Amazon) and Pixma TS8020 ($77.98 at Amazon) (as well as the just-released Pixma TS9120 and Pixma TS8120, which we’ll be reviewing in the coming weeks), as well as the Epson Expression Photo XP-960 ($199.99 at Amazon). And, while they vary in features and capacity (the XP-960 can print tabloid-size 11×17-inch photos, for example), guess what? They all print mighty good photos.

A step down from those are Canon’s and Epson’s five-ink photo printers, which include the Pixma TS6020 ($59.81 at Amazon), Pixma TS6120, Pixma TS5020 ($69.00 at Amazon), and TS5120, as well as the Expression Photo XP-860 ($199.99 at Amazon). The Canon G-series MegaTank printers (there are four of them, as of this writing) and the HP Envy Photo models (three of these) use only four inks, but they still print respectable photos. Our point? The XP-8500 has, by our count, more than 15 in-market rivals. (And there are other so-called “photo printers” out there beyond these.) Granted, as mentioned, they come at varying prices with a wide range of features. But many of them print photos comparable to what we saw from the XP-8500, and to each other.

So, for this review (and the Canon Pixmas coming up), we have our work cut out for us, without turning these comparisons into the War and Peace of consumer-grade photo printers. What we cansay at the start, though: Versus its most direct competitors, we didn’t come up with any compelling reasons not to buy the XP-8500 for churning out your keeper photos. This is one terrific little AIO.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper



 

  • My review of the Xerox VersaLink B400/DN at PCMagPROS

    Fast. Excellent print quality. Strong paper capacity that’s expandable. Has 110,000-page maximum duty cycle. Very high-yield toner cartridges available. Strong security features. Much lighter than competitors.

  • CONS

    Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi Direct, and NFC capabilities are extra. Somewhat high running costs.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Xerox VersaLink B400/DN is a trim, high-volume single-function monochrome laser printer that prints well and quickly, and it’s highly expandable, but lower running costs would make it a better value.

Priced between the Brother HL-L6300DW ($329.00 at Amazon) and the Dell Smart Printer S5830dn ($512.42 at Amazon), both top picks, the Xerox VersaLink B400/DN ($699) is a mid-to-high-volume single-function monochrome laser printer designed for small-to-medium-size offices and workgroups. Like its competitors, it has a high maximum monthly duty cycle; it prints well—and fast—and it’s highly expandable. The B400/DN supports many connectivity and security features, but—as on the Dell S5830dn—many are available only as add-ons. In most ways, though, the B400/DN holds up to its Brother and Dell competitors, except that a slightly high cost per page (CPP) leaves it just shy of receiving our Editors’ Choice nod.