Review of the HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 All-in-One Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Fast. Impressive print quality. Highly competitive running costs. Very well-built. 50-sheet one-pass duplexing ADF. Laser-like security features. Versatile connectivity.

  • CONS

    Pricey compared with competitors. Support for borderless prints limited to A4 and letter-size. Only one paper input source.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 is an excellent inkjet all-in-one printer that’s up to the task of replacing the color laser AIO in your small office.

The HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 All-in-One Printer ($349.99) is a medium-volume business-oriented inkjet all-in-one (AIO) designed for small to midsize offices and workgroups, as well as home-based offices. It comes with a few more productivity and convenience features than the Editors’ Choice Epson WorkForce Pro WF-4720 does, such as an auto-duplexing (and higher-capacity) automatic document feeder (ADF), but it also lists for almost twice as much. Otherwise, the OfficeJet 8730 is fast, prints well, is better-constructed than most of its competitors, and it comes with a slew odf attractive features. If you can justify the higher price, it’s a terrific business-oriented all-in-one office appliance.Read the entire review at PCMag


Read the entire review of the HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M180nw at PCMag

  • PROS

    Good output quality. Reasonably fast. Small and light. Strong mobile connectivity. Low price.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder. No automatic two-sided printing. High cost per page.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The HP LaserJet Pro MFP M180nw is an entry-level color laser AIO that prints well and at a reasonable clip, but large-volume offices should note its high cost of consumables.

The HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M18s0nw ($299.99) is one of the smallest and least-expensive entry-level color laser all-in-one (AIO) printers we’ve recently seen. It’s a little bit slower than our current Editors’ Choice, the somewhat more expensive Canon Color imageClass MF634Cdw, and it prints as well, but the lack of an automatic document feeder (ADF) for sending multipage documents to the scanner, as well as a lofty per-page cost of consumables, should give pause to high-volume offices. Even so, its small footprint, strong print speed, and good output quality make it more than suitable as a personal color laser AIO for churning out low-volume prints and copies in a home-based business, or even a micro office or workgroup.

See the entire review at PCMag



Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Single-pass automatic document feeder (ADF). Expandable paper-input capacity. Large customizable touch control panel. USB thumb drive support. Fast. Good overall print quality. Decent running costs.

  • CONS

    Photograph output could be better.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Canon’s imageClass MF424dw all-in-one (AIO) prints terrific-looking text and graphics at a highly respectable speed for the price, and its competitive running costs make it a great value overall.

A step up from the Canon imageClass MF249dw, a top pick, the Canon imageClass MF424dw ($349) is a little bigger and faster. It has more productivity and convenience features, such as a single-pass auto-duplexing automatic document feeder (ADF), and support for USB thumb drives. Its paper-input capacity is expandable, making it an all-around more versatile and robust monochrome all-in-one (AIO) than the Canon MF249dw—for not that much more money. All that, and Canon’s new three-year warranty, as well as lower-than-average running costs, are more than enough to elevate the MF424dw as our Editors’ Choice for a monochrome laser AIO for low- to moderate-volume printing in a small- to medium-size office or workgroup.

Read the entire review at PCMag



Review of the HP OfficeJet 3830 All-in-One Printer at PCMag

    • PROS

      Very low price. Light and compact. Impressive print quality. Low running costs with Instant Ink. Good-looking photos on HP photo paper. 35-sheet automatic document feeder (ADF). Touch screen is an unexpected amenity.

    • CONS

      Running costs are exorbitant without Instant Ink. No auto-duplexing. Two-cartridge ink setup is potentially wasteful. Lacks flash memory support and Ethernet.

BOTTOM LINE

  • The low-price, entry-level HP OfficeJet 3830 prints well and at reasonable running costs—when you sign up for HP’s Instant Ink subscription program—but you give up some features and functionality for the savings.

The HP OfficeJet 3830 All-In-One Printer ($79.99), an entry-level inkjet all-in-one (AIO), is a capable machine, but like many AIOs in this class, including the more-expensive Canon Pixma TR8520 Wireless Home Office All-In-One Printer, our Editors’ Choice, it has many formidable competitors. Unlike the Canon TR8520, the OfficeJet 3830 does not support two-sided printing, Ethernet networking, flash memory devices, and a few other noteworthy features. What the OfficeJet 3830 does have going for it is that, not only does it cost less than the Canon model, it also costs less to use—as long as you opt for HP’s Instant Ink subscription program, that is. The OfficeJet 3830 prints well, and it’s a good alternative to the Canon TR8520 for low-volume printing and copying in a small or home-based office or student dormitory.

Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Kodak Mini 2 HD Instant Photo Printer at PCMag

    • PROS

      Smaller than its predecessor. Easy to set up and use. Good overall print quality. Robust mobile device app. NFC makes it easy to connect to a mobile device.

CONS

  • Can’t print from a PC. High running costs. Print speeds are slow compared with the competition. Mobile app crashed a few times during testing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Kodak Mini 2 HD Instant Photo Printer produces good-quality photos, and its wireless capabilities make it easy to connect to the mobile app. But somewhat slow print times and stiff running costs hold it back.

Earlier this year, we looked at the Kodak Photo Printer Mini, a portable snapshot photo printer that, like the highly rated HP Sprocket, or the Polaroid Insta-Share, churns out small photos (in this case 2 by 3.4 inches, or business card size). The problem for the Mini, though, is that, at 6 inches long—or an inch or so longer than these other models—it’s just big enough not to be all that miniature.

Kodak has fired back with its new Kodak Mini 2 HD Instant Photo Printer ($99.99). While it still prints 2-by-3.4-inch photos (other photo printers of its ilk print 2-by-3-inch pics), it’s almost an inch shorter than the original Mini, and very close to the Lifeprint 2×3 Hyperphoto Printer and its other competitors in size and girth. And, much like its predecessor and the other portable photo printers, it prints passable photos. The output, however, isn’t nearly as good as photos printed on a few closely priced five- and six-ink consumer-grade photo printers from Canon and Epson.

Read the entire review at PCMag



Review of the Canon imageClass MF236n at PCMag

  • PROS

    Good price. Fits comfortably on an average desktop. Automatic document feeder (ADF). Reasonably fast. Excellent print quality.

  • CONS

    No auto-duplex printing or scanning. Running costs are high. Lacks Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi Direct, and NFC.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Canon’s entry-level imageClass MF236n prints good-looking monochrome documents at a respectable clip, but its running costs relegate it to a low-volume laser AIO.

Like the Editors’ Choice imageClass MF249dw, the Canon imageClass MF236n ($199) is an entry-level monochrome laser all-in-one (AIO) printer designed for low-volume printing, copying, scanning, and faxing in a small or micro home-based office or workgroup. You sacrifice a few things for the low price, however, such as the ability to copy and scan two-sided multipage documents automatically, as well as wireless networking. While the MF236n is a capable little AIO, what you give up for a not-so-significant price difference between it and the Canon MF249dw is more than enough to keep the MF236n as a mere contender; however, in the right low-to-medium-print-volume environments, it’s a sensible alternative to its costlier sibling.
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Canon imageClass MF232w at PCMag

  • PROS

    Good price. Compact. Excellent print quality. Fast print speed.

  • CONS

    Running costs could be better. Lacks automatic document feeder (ADF). No auto-duplex printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    It may lack an ADF and automatic two-sided printing, but Canon’s imageClass MF232w all-in-one (AIO) prints well and at a highly respectable speed for the price.

The Canon imageClass MF232w ($189) is a monochrome all-in-one (AIO) laser printer that’s a step below the Editors’ Choice Canon imageClass MF249dw. Granted, it lacks an automatic document feeder (ADF) and an auto-duplexing print engine for printing two-sided pages automatically. What you do get with this sub-$200 laser AIO, however, is decent print speeds and good output quality for the price, as well as competitive running costs. That makes it a sensible choice for low-volume printing and copying from a home-based or small or micro office or workgroup, or as a low-volume personal laser AIO.
Read entire review at PCMag


Review of Lifeprint 2x3 Hyperphoto Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Innovative “hyperphoto” technology for turning stills to videos. Prints well. Small and light. Easy to set up and use.

  • CONS

    No way to print from PC. Relatively high running costs.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    With its innovative photo-to-video technology, the Lifeprint Photo and Video Printer 2×3 proves itself an intriguing novelty snapshot printer.

Pocket photo printers such as the HP Sprocket and the Kodak Photo Printer Mini offer the convenience of printing on the go from your phone or tablet. The Lifeprint 2×3 Hyperphoto Printer ($129.99) takes this a step further: It comes with its own social media site for sharing photos, and using an augmented reality (AR) technology, it allows you to turn stills into movie clips, or what Lifeprint calls “hyperphotos.” Overall, Lifeprint 2×3 prints well, and it’s an appealing option if you’re open to a unique twist on photo sharing.
Read the entire article at PCMag


Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Good overall output quality. Prints borderless pages up to 13 by 19 inches. Auto-duplexing up to tabloid-size. Supports Wi-Fi Direct and NFC mobile networking. Two large paper drawers.

  • CONS

    High cost per page. No USB thumb drive support.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson WorkForce WF-7210 is a single-function wide-format printer that’s fast and produces quality output, making it an excellent addition to a small office in need of printing pages up to 13 by 19 inches.

The Epson WorkForce WF-7210 Wide-Format Printer ($199.99) bears a striking resemblance to the model it replaces, the Editors’ Choice WorkForce WF-7110. Both single-function models print well overall at reasonable clips, and support a wealth of standard and mobile connectivity features. They can also print borderless pages up to 13 by 19 inches, as well as automatic two-sided pages up to 11 by 17 inches. As such, the WF-7210 replaces its predecessor as our top low- to moderate-volume standalone wide-format printer.
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Epson WorkForce WF-7710 Wide-Format All-in-One Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Prints up to 13-by-19-inch pages. Scans, copies, and faxes multipage, two-sided originals up to 11 by 17 inches. Auto-duplexing ADF and scanner. Large, easy-to-use control panel. Good overall print quality.

  • CONS

    High cost per page. Graphics printing could be better. Only one paper cassette.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson WorkForce WF-7710 prints, copies, and scans wide-format pages with ease, but it doesn’t quite stand up to its formidable competition.

The Epson WorkForce WF-7710 Wide-Format All-in-One Printer ($249.99) is a super-tabloid all-in-one (AIO) capable of borderless prints up to 13 by 19 inches. It also scans, copies, and faxes up to tabloid size (11 by 17 inches).However, the WF-7710 costs significantly more to use than our Editors’ Choice Brother MFC-J6935DW, and its paper capacity is less than half. It’s worth considering the WF-7710 if you need to print super-tabloid size pages (the Brother model can only handle up to tabloid size), but otherwise, the Epson is a perfectly good printer that faces some very stiff competition.
Read the entire review at PCMag