Review of the Brother MFC-J6945DW INKvestment Tank Color Inkjet All-In-One Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Low running costs. Good print quality. Prints, scans, copies, and faxes tabloid-size pages. Single-pass duplexing ADF. Three paper input sources.

  • CONS

    Super-tabloid support would provide greater value.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Brother MFC-J6945DW is a wide-format color inkjet all-in-one printer that prints well and is feature-packed and inexpensive to use, making it an exceptional value for small offices.


The Brother MFC-J6945DW ($349.99) is a light- to medium-duty wide-format all-in-one inkjet printer designed for small-office use. Like its predecessor, the Editors’ Choice Brother MFC-J6935DW, it can not only print, but also copy, scan, and fax tabloid-size pages and comes with a generous paper-input capacity. The cherry on top is that it prints quite well and at a very reasonable cost per page. All of these perks add up to an easy Editors’ Choice for the MFC-J6945DW.

Read the entire review at PCMag



 

Review of the Brother MFC-L3710CW at PCMagPROS

Good text and photo quality. Large ADF. Decent mobile device support.

CONS

High running costs. Lacks auto-duplex printing and scanning. No Ethernet.

BOTTOM LINE

The Brother MFC-L3710CW is a solid color laser-class all-in-one printer for budget-conscious small offices.


The Brother MFC-L3710CW ($349.99) is an entry-level all-in-one color laser-class printer designed for small offices and workgroups. It costs $50 less than the Editors’ Choice Brother MFC-L3770CDW, but that price difference means sacrificing a few key features, including automatic two-sided printing, copying, scanning, and faxing, along with Ethernet support and the ability to print from and scan to thumb drives. Both machines, however, share the same high running costs—a common drawback to entry-level laser-class machines like these. The MFC-L3710CW offers some strong perks, including good text and photo quality and a sizable automatic document feeder, but you’ll likely find the MFC-L3770CDW a better value if your budget can stretch a bit.

Read the entire review at PCMag



 

Review of the Brother HL-L3210CW at PCMag

  • PROS

    Good text and photo quality. Wi-Fi Direct mobile device support. Respectable paper capacity.

  • CONS

    No Ethernet connectivity or auto-duplexing. Lacks support for Web Connect printer apps. Graphics print quality below average.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Brother’s HL-L3210CW is a capable, if basic, color laser-class LED printer for small offices where tight budgets require some corner-cutting.


The Brother HL-L3210CW ($199.99) is a step down from its sibling, the Editors’ Choice HL-L3270CDW. Designed for small offices, both single-function color laser-class printers have the same paper capacity, volume ratings, running costs, and several other like features. What you give up for the $50 price difference, though, is significant, including an easy-to-use touch-screen control panel, plentiful connectivity options, and high-quality graphics output. In other words, it’s worth weighing feature set versus price when considering the HL-L3210CW over its more expensive sibling.

Read the entire article at PCMag



 

Review of the Canon Pixma TS8220 Wireless Inkjet All-In-One Printer at PCMagPROS
Excellent print quality. Smart home hands-free printing. Built-in arts and crafts features. Uses six inks. Two paper input trays. SD card support.

CONS
Lacks NFC or Wi-Fi Direct support. Somewhat slow document printing. Lacks automatic document feeder. High cost per page.

BOTTOM LINE
The Canon Pixma TS8220 combines the company’s superb six-ink photo and graphics output with new hands-free printing and several arts and crafts features, making it a great-value all-in-one-printer for low-volume offices.


The Canon Pixma TS8220 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($199.99) is, except for the addition of a handful of interesting arts and crafts and hands-free-printing features, essentially the same AIO as its predecessor, the Pixma TS8120. Like all the six-ink Pixmas we’ve tested over the years, the TS8220 prints exceptionally well, but, also like the rest of its kin, it costs a lot to use. In addition to above-par output, the TS8220’s support for popular scrapbooking and other crafting projects, as well as its new smart home features, make it a great-value home-and-family-oriented consumer-grade AIO printer for low-volume use.

Read the entire review at PCMag



 

Review of the Epson WorkForce Pro WF-C5790 Network Multifunction Color Printer at PCMagPROS
Competitive purchase price and running costs. Excellent print quality. Expandable paper capacity. Single-pass auto-duplexing ADF. Supports high-yield ink bags.

CONS
Lacks support for borderless output. Initial paper input capacity a bit low.

BOTTOM LINE

The Epson WorkForce Pro WF-C5790 is an inkjet all-in-one printer that’s packed with features, prints well, and balances purchase price and running costs fairly, making it a strong color laser AIO competitor.


Few inkjets have been better positioned to encroach on the color laser all-in-one market than the Epson WorkForce Pro WF-C5790 ($299.99). It’s relatively fast and churns out near-typesetter print quality across the board. It’s loaded with productivity, convenience, and mobile connectivity features that small- and medium-size offices will appreciate, and its high-volume replaceable ink packs deliver running costs about half that of comparable laser-based machines. The Epson WF-C5790 all but obliterates the line between color laser and inkjet machines, thereby easily elevating it to our Editors’ Choice among mid-volume color AIOs.

Read the entire article at PCMag



 

The Best Label Printers

From Convenient to Mission Critical

When most people think of label makers—or label printers, labeling systems, barcode printers, or whatever each manufacturer calls its wares—those little handheld devices with small keyboards and one-line monochrome LCDs come to mind. Well, even though many of those are still available, at this point they are yesterday’s technology.

In fact, these days, there are many types and levels of label printers (in terms of price, label quality, and volume) available—from inexpensive and convenient consumer-grade models for labeling containers and other articles around home, to the mission-critical machines for printing shipping labels, warnings (Stop, Caution, Fragile, and so on), barcodes, product labels, and so much more.

Read the entire review at PCMag



 

    • Review of the Canon Pixma TS9521C Wireless Crafter's All-In-One Printer at PCMagPROS

      Excellent print quality. Supports borderless square and tabloid-size media. Smart home ITFFF enabled. Robust connectivity.

    • CONS

      Lacks NFC and Wi-Fi Direct. Somewhat slow document printing. Lacks automatic two-sided scanning.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Canon Pixma TS9521C combines superb five-ink photo and graphics output, smart home voice support, and a host of scrapbook-friendly features, making it a great wide-format AIO printer for crafters.

The Canon Pixma TS9521C Wireless Crafter’s All-In-One Printer ($249.99) is the first consumer-grade photo/arts and crafts all-in-one printer with smart home capabilities that we’ve tested. It’s the crafters’ iteration of the Editors’ Choice Pixma TS9520, offering support for the popular 12-by-12-inch scrapbooking paper size, a wide selection of built-in printable patterns and templates, and a few other notable crafting features, as well as support for hands-free “smart” printing. And, like most other TS-series Pixmas, it prints exceptionally well. Add it all up—the new crafting features, smart home functionality, exceptional output, and more—and the Pixma TS9521C is a standout printer for scrapbookers and hobbyists.

Read the review at PCMag



 

Review of the Brother RuggedJet 2PROS

Good print quality. Speedy. PC, network, and mobile connectivity options. First-rate label design and print software and mobile apps. Low running costs.

  • CONS

    No charging apparatus in the box. Expensive.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Brother RJ-2050 is a rugged, portable label and receipt printer designed for heavy-duty, on-demand use.


The Brother RJ-2050 ($695) is a strictly business label maker, designed primarily for highly mobile on-demand applications. As part of Brother’s RuggedJet series, it’s built to a high set of durability standards. In many settings, such as your showroom, warehouse, or order fulfillment desk, staff can carry it around with them, printing receipts, markdown tags, order pickup tickets, and so on, on the fly. These attributes combined with its multiple connectivity options make it a great choice for enterprises where printing and distributing a lot of labels on demand (and on the fly) is mission critical.

Read the entire review at PCMag.


 

    • PROS

      Small and light. Prints up to legal-size pages. Numerous accessories. Long-life battery. Good output quality. No ink required.

    • CONS

      Pricey. Slow. Requires additional purchase for input tray. Can’t print color.

    • BOTTOM LINE

      Review of the Brother PocketJet 7 PJ763MFi-WK at PCMagThe Brother PocketJet 7 PJ763MFi-WK is a super-portable thermal printer for car-mounting and other on-the-go applications that require quality monochrome output at up to legal size.

Brother’s PocketJet 7 PJ763MFi-WK ($779) portable thermal printer is an update to the PocketJet PJ673-K we reviewed back in 2013. The biggest change comes in the form of Bluetooth connectivity for Apple iOS devices (that link could previously only be handled via a Wi-Fi connection). It also comes with a Li-ion battery for impressive life off of the cord. It’s expensive, but if you’re on the go and down and dirty black-on-white documents are all you need, the PJ763MFi-WK is an excellent option. And depending on your needs, it may be the sole option; it’s the only thermal printer we know of that prints up to legal-size pages. If you require color prints, though, the Editors’ Choice HP OfficeJet 200 Mobile Printer will be more your speed.

Read the entire review at PCMag



 

Review of the Sprocket 2nd Edition at PCMag

  • PROS

    Impressive print quality. Lower price and running costs than original Sprocket. Expressive colors. Sprocket App has lots of new functionality. Nascent augmented-reality aspects.

  • CONS

    A few features (notably, multi-user connections and print queue) are under-developed.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    HP’s Sprocket 2nd Edition portable photo printer costs less than the original and stands out with its unique design and quirky AR angle. But most impressive is the improved print quality.

Get Dieter and Helmut out of your head: You’re thinking of the wrong Sprockets. The HP Sprocket 2nd Edition ($129.99), a pocket-size portable snapshot printer, is the company’s third by that name, replacing the popular original Sprocket reviewed in December 2016. Since then, we’ve tested similar models from Canon, Kodak, and Lifeprint, but we didn’t find one worthy of our Editors’ Choice nod until the HP Sprocket Plus came along in mid-2018. The Sprocket 2nd Edition’s beefed-up feature list, funky augmented-reality angle, and impressive output-quality overhaul represent big steps forward for this fun device. Our new Editors’ Choice, the HP Sprocket 2nd Edition ends its sibling’s short reign as PCMag’s top portable photo printer.

Read the entire review at PCMag