My review of the Canon Pixma G4210 MegaTank Wireless All-in-One Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Excellent running costs. Great print quality, especially photos. Prints Instagram’s 5-by-5-inch images. Ethernet networking. Strong mobile device support.

  • CONS

    No Wi-Fi Direct or auto-duplexing. Slow document printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Canon Pixma G4210 is a small-office bulk-ink AIO printer that produces quality output at a super-low price.

The Canon Pixma G4210 Wireless MegaTank All-in-One ($399.99) is designed for home-based and small offices and workgroups. Like its predecessor, the Pixma G4200, it sits at the top of the company’s MegaTank brand bulk-ink printers. Except for a few new features, such as Ethernet connectivity and a slew of updated utilities, this new Pixma is a lot like the old one. This all-in-one doesn’t have the speed or wealth of features that the Editors’ Choice Pixma TS9120 offers, but its exceptional output and low running costs make it a strong contender for offices where quality and cost is key.

Read the entire review at PCMag



Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Decent print quality for a Zink-based model. Makes slightly larger prints than Sprocket predecessor. App is easy to set up and use.

  • CONS

    Can’t print from a PC. Running costs, like with most Zink printers, are a bit high.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    An update to HP’s popular Sprocket portable photo printer, the Sprocket Plus prints larger pics, and its software packs a wide range of effects. It’s the most versatile model of its kind.

The HP Sprocket Plus ($149.99) is an update to the HP Sprocket portable photo printer we reviewed late last year. This newer iteration prints 30 percent larger photos (they are 2.3 by 3.4 inches, versus the original’s 2 by 3 inches), and the quality is better, too. The Sprocket and Sprocket Plus aren’t unique; they compete with similar products from Canon, Kodak, Lifeprint, Polaroid, and a few others. While most of these pocket photo printers, in terms of print quality, speed, and running costs, are near equals, the slightly bigger prints and the new functionality in its app set the Sprocket Plus apart from the pack—enough to elevate it to our latest Editors’ Choice for portable photo printers.

Read the entire review at PCMag



My review of the Epson Expression Premium XP-6000 Small-in-One Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Uses five inks for exceptional output quality, especially photos. Capable of borderless prints. Small and light.

  • CONS

    High running costs. Input and output capacities are low.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson Expression Premium XP-6000 Small-in-One is a basic but capable photo-centric all-in-one inkjet printer that delivers excellent print and copy quality, but its high ink costs relegate it to light-duty use.

The Epson Expression Premium XP-6000 Small-in-One Printer ($149.99) is a capable little entry-level all-in-one (print, copy, scan) inkjet designed for home-based and family offices with light-duty printing needs. Like the Editors’ Choice Canon Pixma TS9120, the XP-6000 is a photo-centric machine capable of printing large, borderless photos. However, the Canon model’s more robust feature set and lower ink costs are more than enough to justify its $50 higher list price. But if you simply need a basic, inexpensive AIO for light-duty use in a home office, the XP-6000 is a solid choice.

Read the entire review at PCMag



Review of the Canon IVY Mini Photo Printer at PCMag.da

  • PROS 

    Good print quality for its class. Easy to set up and use. Tiling feature allows for bigger images and collages. Competitive running costs.

  • CONS

    Can’t print from a PC. Bluetooth is only connection option. Lacks support for Wi-Fi. No savings for buying paper in bulk.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    With on-par output quality, print speeds, and running costs for a Zink-based photo printer, the Canon IVY Mini is a solid portable model that churns out 2-by-3-inch prints.

Over the past few years, we’ve seen a surge of pocket photo printers that you operate solely from your smartphone or tablet. A few, notably the HP Sprocket Photo Printer and the Lifeprint 2×3 Hyperphoto Printer, have managed top ratings in PCMag reviews. Now, along comes Canon’s IVY Mini Photo Printer ($129.99), which, aside from a few set-apart print features, is essentially a “me-too” model. It prints as well as most of its competitors, and it comes with an easy-to-use app for printing, as well as for cropping and enhancing your photos. In our testing, though, little about the IVY stands out. It’s as good a choice as most of its competitors, assuming what you’re after are tiny, on-the-fly prints from a mobile device.

Read the entire review at PCMag



Review of the Kodak Mini 2 HD Instant Photo Printer at PCMag

    • PROS

      Smaller than its predecessor. Easy to set up and use. Good overall print quality. Robust mobile device app. NFC makes it easy to connect to a mobile device.

CONS

  • Can’t print from a PC. High running costs. Print speeds are slow compared with the competition. Mobile app crashed a few times during testing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Kodak Mini 2 HD Instant Photo Printer produces good-quality photos, and its wireless capabilities make it easy to connect to the mobile app. But somewhat slow print times and stiff running costs hold it back.

Earlier this year, we looked at the Kodak Photo Printer Mini, a portable snapshot photo printer that, like the highly rated HP Sprocket, or the Polaroid Insta-Share, churns out small photos (in this case 2 by 3.4 inches, or business card size). The problem for the Mini, though, is that, at 6 inches long—or an inch or so longer than these other models—it’s just big enough not to be all that miniature.

Kodak has fired back with its new Kodak Mini 2 HD Instant Photo Printer ($99.99). While it still prints 2-by-3.4-inch photos (other photo printers of its ilk print 2-by-3-inch pics), it’s almost an inch shorter than the original Mini, and very close to the Lifeprint 2×3 Hyperphoto Printer and its other competitors in size and girth. And, much like its predecessor and the other portable photo printers, it prints passable photos. The output, however, isn’t nearly as good as photos printed on a few closely priced five- and six-ink consumer-grade photo printers from Canon and Epson.

Read the entire review at PCMag



Review of Lifeprint 2x3 Hyperphoto Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Innovative “hyperphoto” technology for turning stills to videos. Prints well. Small and light. Easy to set up and use.

  • CONS

    No way to print from PC. Relatively high running costs.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    With its innovative photo-to-video technology, the Lifeprint Photo and Video Printer 2×3 proves itself an intriguing novelty snapshot printer.

Pocket photo printers such as the HP Sprocket and the Kodak Photo Printer Mini offer the convenience of printing on the go from your phone or tablet. The Lifeprint 2×3 Hyperphoto Printer ($129.99) takes this a step further: It comes with its own social media site for sharing photos, and using an augmented reality (AR) technology, it allows you to turn stills into movie clips, or what Lifeprint calls “hyperphotos.” Overall, Lifeprint 2×3 prints well, and it’s an appealing option if you’re open to a unique twist on photo sharing.
Read the entire article at PCMag


Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Good overall output quality. Prints borderless pages up to 13 by 19 inches. Auto-duplexing up to tabloid-size. Supports Wi-Fi Direct and NFC mobile networking. Two large paper drawers.

  • CONS

    High cost per page. No USB thumb drive support.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson WorkForce WF-7210 is a single-function wide-format printer that’s fast and produces quality output, making it an excellent addition to a small office in need of printing pages up to 13 by 19 inches.

The Epson WorkForce WF-7210 Wide-Format Printer ($199.99) bears a striking resemblance to the model it replaces, the Editors’ Choice WorkForce WF-7110. Both single-function models print well overall at reasonable clips, and support a wealth of standard and mobile connectivity features. They can also print borderless pages up to 13 by 19 inches, as well as automatic two-sided pages up to 11 by 17 inches. As such, the WF-7210 replaces its predecessor as our top low- to moderate-volume standalone wide-format printer.
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Lifeprint 3x4.5 HyperPhoto Printer at PCMagThe times they are a-changin’: We’re currently seeing a proliferation of consumer-grade standalone photo printers, such as the Kodak Photo Printer Mini [amazon_link asins=’B01KO0T5VA’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’be156208-165a-11e8-9f69-c5ce23edae8c’], which we reviewed recently. It’s not surprising that these new models, like today’s review unit, the Lifeprint 3×4.5 ($149.99) [amazon_link asins=’B01MXIL35C’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’57dee2fe-165b-11e8-a058-19dae9188bdf’], are getting smaller and more compact. However, what’s somewhat unexpected is that these new printers aren’t compatible with the devices they’ve traditionally been associated with, namely computers. In fact, the Kodak Mini, HP Sprocket [amazon_link asins=’B01LBWEMP4′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’f8d5a9a0-165a-11e8-987b-b9d666f7ab21′], and the Lifeprint 3×4.5 and its sibling, the Lifeprint 2×3 [amazon_link asins=’B076BFSMPW’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’77bbeedc-165b-11e8-ac92-2bada3d7767b’], all can print from mobile devices, but lack support for, or connections to desktop PCs.

[amazon_link asins=’B01MXIL35C’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’8cc0f18b-165b-11e8-a6c8-ab2932b98088′]These snapshot printers produce photos that range in size from about 2 by 3 inches up to, in the case of the Kodak Dock, 4 by 6 inches. The Lifeprint 3×4.5 is actually an update to the Lifeprint 2×3, which the company says was an answer to requests for a larger photo size. In any case, the Lifeprint now comes in two sizes.

It also has a few interesting features you won’t find on competing models, such as the ability to publish stills as short videos, a feature that the company calls “augmented reality.” As you’ll see in the Design, Features, & Software section, this feature actually lets you publish your photos as brief videos—sort of.

The Lifeprint device is also, as mentioned, a dedicated mobile snapshot printer that, when paired with your mobile device, allows you to post photos on media sites and make rudimentary edits (such as brightness, contrast, and color corrections) or enhancements (like cropping, scaling, and rotating, as well as adding text, borders, and filters).

Whether it’s the Lifeprint or any dedicated snapshot printer, you’ll have to ask yourself several questions to determine whether it’s right for you: Is it competitively priced? How well does it perform in print quality, photo editing, and other areas? What are its ongoing running costs? And, in this case, do you want or need the augmented reality features?

We’ll do our best to answer all of these questions, but suffice it to say, we found the augmented reality, print quality, and cost per photo (CPP) compelling enough to give the Lifeprint 3×4.5 our Editors’ Choice nod.

Read entire review at Computer Shopper



 

  • PROSA review of the HP Envy Photo 6255 All-in-One Printer from PCMag

    Reasonable price. Attractive design. Low running costs with Instant Ink. Good overall print quality.

  • CONS

    Cost per page exceptionally high without Instant Ink. Banding in dark gradients and backgrounds. Wasteful two-cartridge ink system holds all four inks.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Envy Photo 6255 is a small, lightweight, and attractive consumer-grade AIO that prints good-looking photos and does so at highly competitive running costs, though only when you sign up for HP’s Instant Ink.

[amazon_link asins=’B074P569PP’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’53621d72-09cb-11e8-ab65-b7a3c8b48775′]The lower-end model in a trio of entry-level consumer-grade all-in-one (AIO)inkjet photo printers that HP released recently, the Envy Photo 6255 All-in-One Printer ($129.99) [amazon_link asins=’B074P569PP’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’79ed35da-09cb-11e8-8137-37873a0c94f6′] competes directly with the Editors’ Choice Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless Inkjet Printer,[amazon_link asins=’B074VFYB9J’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’9a7d3d92-09cb-11e8-be2c-87f015ab7942′] as well as a few others in the Pixma TS-series line. The Envy 6255 is a bit slower, shorter on features, and its photo print quality falls a little behind that of the Canon TS9120; on the other hand, when you pair it with HP’s Instant Ink subscription service, you get some of the lowest per-page running costs from a consumer-grade photo printer available, making the Envy 6255 an excellent alternative for homes and families who want to print a few hundred photos inexpensively.
Read the entire review at PCMags



 

Brother MFC-J775DW Review and Ratings at Computer ShopperTis the season of the low-cost, entry-level all-in-one (AIO) printer. Recently, we’ve reviewed models from Canon (the Pixma TS3120 Wireless All-in-One) [amazon_link asins=’B074VD1GGT’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’0fd14204-f0ad-11e7-8384-43025b845dd7′], HP (the DeskJet 2655 All-in-One [amazon_link asins=’B06XHXWB7B’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’27a20f2d-f0ad-11e7-ab5b-95bda7d75de2′] and DeskJet 3755 All-in-One) [amazon_link asins=’B01GAIU7HG’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’4d6d33a2-f0ad-11e7-9ef8-31d3904d7179′], and now Brother’s $149-street MFC-J775DW, today’s review model. While the Canon and HP machines cost under $100, and the MFC-J775DW [amazon_link asins=’B01D8O2VKQ’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’5b5cdbdd-f0ad-11e7-b9cc-4bfa9a11afb5′] costs more for the same speed ratings and capacities, the Brother costs significantly less to use.

[amazon_link asins=’B01D8O2VKQ’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’6e0bb99e-f0ad-11e7-8b46-99bcfa06c15f’]And that’s the primary reason the MFC-J775DW lists for more than $100. (Aside, perhaps, from its automatic document feeder, or ADF, for scanning multipage documents without assistance; most sub-$100 models lack one.) It is one of Brother’s INKvestment line of AIOs, the company’s response to Epson’s EcoTank and Canon’s MegaTank bulk-ink models, which ask you to pay more for the machine up front to save on the ongoing per-page price of ink. Hence, in our Cost Per Page section later on, we’ll show you how (in this printer’s case, anyway) paying an additional $50 or so for the printer itself could—if you use it enough—save you significantly in consumables over the life of the machine.

How do Brother’s INKvestment machines differ from MegaTank and EcoTank AIOs? The INKvestment models use typical ink cartridges, whereas the Canon and Epson machines get their ink from bottles. You use them to fill reservoirs built into the printers themselves. In addition, the Canon and Epson models come with enough ink in the box to churn out thousands of pages, compared to the MFC-J775DW’s initial 2,400 monochrome and 1,200 color pages.

Brother MFC-J775DW (Printer and Ink)

You can, by the way, buy an “XL” iteration of the MFC-J775DW that comes with three sets of cartridges, for three times the prints, for an additional $100. This puts the XL version in direct competition with Epson’s Expression ET-2600 EcoTank All-in-One [amazon_link asins=’B01N0GJFUH’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’9915a347-f0ad-11e7-ae47-552018496668′] and Canon’s Pixma G3200 Wireless MegaTank All-in-One.[amazon_link asins=’B07214SQW3′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’abb2802a-f0ad-11e7-a3b4-dfd45b7e2736′] (Neither of these has an ADF, whereas the MFC-J775DW does.)

Whether, by the way, you should buy the XL version or the non-XL model depends on how much you print. If you can afford the additional C-note, our calculations indicate that for the $100 more that you’d pay for the MFC-J775DW XL, you get about $138 worth of extra ink in the box. So it depends on how quickly you’ll use that ink; saving $38 over the course of a year or two isn’t as attractive as saving that amount over a two- or three-month period.

Brother specializes in serious business printers, and while the MFC-J775DW is technically an office printer, as opposed to a photo-centric family-oriented machine, it’s not anywhere near a heavy-duty workhorse. Despite its lower running costs, this is a low-volume machine, as measured by its 12-page-per-minute (ppm) print speed rating. Even so, it prints, copies, and scans well, and its ADF makes it much more suitable to office-minded tasks, such as copying and scanning multipage documents, than several competing models. Reasonable print speeds, good print quality, relatively low running costs, dependable operation, an automatic document feeder, and a two-year warranty make this AIO a good value.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper