• Review of the Visioneer Patriot H80 document scanner at PCMagPROS

    Very fast scanning and saving to PDF. Above-average OCR accuracy. 10,000-page daily duty cycle. Comprehensive software bundle includes PDF creation and editing and document management software.

  • CONS

    Pricey. Not notably faster than much-less-expensive sibling.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    A remarkably fast workhorse document scanner, the Visioneer Patriot H80 is quicker and more accurate than most of its competitors, including its slightly lower-rated, less-expensive Patriot H60 sibling—but not enough to justify a hefty price difference.

Aside from a higher price and faster scanning speeds, the Visioneer Patriot H80 ($1,595) is identical to the Editors’ Choice Visioneer Patriot H60. Both sheet-feed document scanners have the same daily duty cycles, the same size automatic document feeders (ADFs), and they come with the same software bundle. In addition, both machines are quite fast, even when scanning and saving to searchable PDF. As sheet-feed document scanners go, the Patriot H80 is one of the fastest, and it’s highly accurate, making it well-suited for medium-to-heavy volume scanning in small- or mid-size offices and workgroups, but unless you need all the speed you can possibly get, the huge price difference between it and its less-expensive sibling seems excessive.

Read the entire review at PCMag

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  • Review of the Visioneer Patriot H60 at PCMagPROS

    Exceptional optical character recognition (OCR) accuracy. Feature-rich, easy-to-deploy software. Very fast scanning and saving to PDF. 10,000-page daily duty cycle.

  • CONS

    Would be more competitive at a lower price.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Visioneer Patriot H60 scans quickly and accurately, and it has a huge daily duty cycle and a comprehensive software bundle.

With speed ratings similar to the HP ScanJet Enterprise Flow 7000 s3 Sheet-Feed Scanner, a top pick, the Visioneer Patriot H60 ($1,095) scans fast and accurately, and it comes with a significantly higher daily duty cycle. It’s also one of the fastest scanners in this class that PCMag has reviewed recently, especially when saving to searchable PDF, but it costs $200 more than the HP model. It comes with an impressive software bundle that includes Visioneer’s easy-to-use OneTouch scanning interface utility, as well as state-of-the-art optical character recognition (OCR) and document-management programs. In most ways, it outpaces the HP ScanJet 7000, more than enough to compensate for the higher price, making it our Editors’ Choice as a moderate-to-high-volume document scanner for small and medium-size offices and workgroups.

See the entire review at PCMag


 

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Brother MFC-L8610CDWWhat We Liked…
  • Respectable print speeds
  • Good print quality overall
  • Strong cloud, mobile-device support
  • Sturdy build
  • Competitive cost per page
  • Highly expandable
What We Didn’t…
  • Running costs a bit high versus some competing AIOs, with graphics and photo quality a slight step down
  • ADF cannot auto-duplex
  • Much more robust sibling costs little more

Brother MFC-L8610CDW Review

By William Harrel, reviewed July 11, 2017

Here in 2017, we’ve looked at a healthy bunch of midrange color laser all-in-one (AIO) printers that are quite capable. Here’s another, and we can summarize it in a sentence: It’s a solid effort, but this model’s a questionable step down if you look at its step-up sibling.

Brother’s $529.99-list MFC-L8610CDW is a less-expensive iteration (by about $50) of the MFC-L8900CDW reviewed some time ago at our sister site, PCMag.com. While both machines print reasonably well and at a good clip, with the MFC-L8610CDW you give up a lot for that $50. Depending on what and how you print, that may matter a little, or a whole bunch.

But first, let’s look at what these two Brother AIOs have in common. Both are loaded with features, including identical networking options and several ways to print from and scan to your mobile devices, as well as more than a handful of cloud-service access choices. They both come with state-of-the-art document-management software, and each delivers competitive running costs for its class. Nowadays, though, running costs for entry-level and midrange laser printers are high compared to most other competing product types. That includes higher-end, higher-volume color laser AIOs, such as the Dell Color Smart Multifunction Printer S3845cdn, or business inkjets made to compete with color lasers, such as the HP PageWide Pro 477dw. (We’ll look at how these AIOs’ cost-per-page figures compare to those of today’s Brother model later on.)

Brother MFC-L8610CDW (Front View)

In a lot of ways—print speed, connectivity features, software bundle, and security—the MFC-L8610CDW and the MFC-L8900CDW are alike. The primary difference between them is that the higher-end model’s ADF is larger and it supports auto-duplexing (automatic feeding of two-sided documents for scanning and copying), but the MFC-L8610CDW’s ADF does not. This may not seem like much, but if you copy, scan, or fax stacks of two-sided documents often, the feature is well worth the additional $50. Add to that a higher paper-input capacity, access to larger toner cartridges, and the lower running costs you gain with the MFC-L8900CDW, and it seems to us that spending the additional $50 is a no-brainer.

Normally, we’d add here that if you don’t think you’ll be using the auto-duplexer, then by all means, take the $50 savings. However, given the price and capacity of this AIO, we’re not sure, in this case, that this is good advice. If you’ve ever scanned, copied, or faxed a bunch of two-sided documents, you know how tedious and time-consuming it can be. Hence, while this is a highly capable midrange color laser AIO, we must include the caveat that, unless you’re absolutely sure that you don’t (and won’t) need auto-duplexing, you should be looking at the higher-end model.


 

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  • Review of the Kodak ScanMate i1150WN at PCMagPROS

    Robust, easy-to-deploy software. Excellent OCR accuracy. Includes PDF creation and editing and document management software. Supports numerous network and other connectivity modes.

  • CONS

    Somewhat pricy. Slow at saving to searchable PDF.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Kodak ScanMate i1150WN is a bit slow for the price, but this scanner comes with numerous network and other connectivity options and terrific software, and OCR accuracy is above average.

The Kodak ScanMate i1150WN ($650) from Kodak Alaris is similar in many ways to its previous iteration, the Kodak ScanMate i1150, except that it supports both wired and wireless networking. It’s not, however, as fast as some network-ready scanners we have reviewed, including the Editors’ Choice Brother ImageCenter ADS-3600W and Epson’s significantly less expensive WorkForce ES-500W Wireless Duplex Document Scanner. Even though the i1150WN is not lickety-split, it’s plenty fast enough for many micro office and workgroup environments, and it comes with slick and easy-to-use software, making it a good choice for low-to-moderate network document scanning, especially for use at the front desk in medical and dental offices.Read entire review at PCMag


 

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  • Review of the Epson WorkForce Pro WF-4740 at PCMagPROS

    Excellent print quality overall. Auto-duplexing ADF. Competitively low running costs. Supports Wi-Fi Direct and NFC. Fast for its class.

  • CONS

    No multipurpose tray. Small output tray. Slightly expensive.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The WF-4740 prints well and fast, and it supports just about every midrange business-centric inkjet feature available, including Wi-Fi Direct, NFC, and two-sided scanning.

The Epson WorkForce Pro WF-4740 ($299.99) is a more robust version of the Editors’ Choice WF-4720, a business-centric inkjet all-in-one (AIO) printer. For the difference in price (about $100), you get twice the paper input capacity, a larger automatic document feeder (ADF) that supports two-sided scanning, and a bigger color touch screen. Like its less-expensive sibling, it prints well and quickly, and comes with a wide range of connectivity options.

The WF-4740 is more expensive than our current Editors’ Choice, the Canon Maxify MB2720 Wireless Home Office All-in-One Printer, but it’s faster, prints a little better, and comes with several additional useful features, making it our new first choice for low-to-moderate print volume in a small workgroup or micro office.

See entire review at PCMag


 

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Review of the Apparent Doxie Q scanner at PCMagThe Apparent Doxie Q ($299.99), like the IRIScan Anywhere 5, is an uber-portable document scanner that, unlike much of the competition, doesn’t need to be attached to a PC to do its job. The primary differences between the Doxie Q and the Anywhere 5 are that the former comes with an automatic document feeder (ADF), where the latter requires you to feed it manually, one page at a time. On the other hand, the IRIScan model has a much more robust, modern, and complete software bundle, while, in addition to Windows and MacOS, the Doxie Q also provides an app for uploading (and processing) your scans to Apple’s iOS, so you can use it with an iPhone or iPad. The real appeal here is that both allow you to scan virtually anywhere, but the Doxie Q has an ADF and a heartier, replaceable battery so it can scan longer.

Read the entire review at PCMag


 

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Review of the Brother HL-L8360CDW at PCMagThe Brother HL-L8360CDW ($399.99), a color laser printer, is essentially the recent Editors’ Choice Brother HL-L8260CDW on steroids. The HL-L8360CDW gives you greater expandability, twice the memory, a higher duty cycle, access to higher-yield toner cartridges, lower running costs, greater security, and a few additional functions, such as near-field communication (NFC) and a color touch screen. Like the HL-L8260CDW, it prints well and at a fast clip. All of this for just $70 more makes the HL-L8360CDW a better value, and therefore our latest top choice for a moderate-to-heavy volume color laser printer for a micro or small office or workgroup.

Read the entire review at PCMag


 

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Review of the Canon Color imageClass MF634Cdw at PCMagA $399 list price places the Canon Color imageClass MF634Cdw neck and neck with the Editors’ Choice HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M277dw among low-volume personal color laser all-in-one (AIO) printers. It’s also suitable for light-duty use in a micro or small office or workgroup. Unlike the HP model, though, the MF634Cdw comes with a duplexing automatic document feeder (ADF) that supports single-pass two-sided scanning. Like other printers in this class, though, its running costs are high, although competitive for what it is. A low purchase price, a robust feature set, better-than-average print quality, and competitive printing costs make the MF634Cdw our new top choice as an entry-level color laser AIO printer.


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Review of the HP OfficeJet Pro 8216 at PCMagEssentially a two-drawer version of the HP OfficeJet Pro 8210, the OfficeJet Pro 8216 ($179.99) is notably slower than its less expensive sibling, but overall print quality is markedly better. A single-function color inkjet business printer, it’s comparable in features and capacity to the Editors’ Choice Canon Maxify iB4120 Wireless Small Office Inkjet Printer, but it costs a little more. The 8216 and Canon iB4120 deliver similar running costs, but the former is eligible for HP’s Instant Ink subscription service, which can save you a bunch on ink. While it doesn’t quite live up to the Canon model’s superior print quality, the OfficeJet Pro 8216 has many assets that make it an excellent alternative to a color laser.

See the entire review at PCMag 

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Review of the Canon Color imageClass MF731Cdw at PCMagThe Canon imageClass MF731Cdw ($489) is a color laser multifunction printer (MFP), designed for use in a small office or workgroup. Like the Editors’ Choice Samsung Multifunction Printer ProXpress C3060FW, the MF731Cdn prints well at decent running costs, but unlike the Samsung, its automatic document feeder (ADF) is not auto-duplexing, nor does it support near-field communication (NFC). Even so, expandable input capacity and built-in Wi-Fi make the Canon MF731Cdw a viable, slightly less expensive alternative to the C3060FW for low-to-moderate volume printing and copying in a small, micro, or home-based office.

Read the entire review at PCMag


 

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