Canon Pixma MX532 Wireless Office All-in-OnePerhaps no printer maker offers more entry-level (under $150) all-in-ones (AIOs) than imaging giant, Canon. Part of that product line includes a series of office-oriented Pixmas ranging in price between about $70 and $150. Each spring, like clockwork, models in this product line are updated, with the underlying print engine and several other key components remaining the same—which is OK if you start with a sound core machine to begin with.

Read the entire review at About.com.

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Top Alternative Inkjet Printhead PrintersTwo new printhead technologies from HP (PageWide) and Epson (PrecisionCore) have brought inkjet printers even closer to their laser-class (LED and true laser) counterparts, in terms of print speeds and cost per page (CPP). As described in this About.com “Alternative Inkjet Printhead Printers” article, while the two technologies are different—one deploys a fixed printhead and the other does not—they both use a significantly denser grouping of ink nozzles than more traditional inkjet printheads do.

Read the entire review at About.com.

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Choosing the Right Printer 101Single-function, multifunction, low-volume, high-volume, photo printers, office printers—and I’m just getting started. With all the different types of printers out there, with seemingly several different models appropriate to the same tasks, it’s difficult sometimes to determine which printer is right for your application—how will you use it? There are a bunch of things to consider; here are some of the most important things to think about as you shop for a printer.

Read the entire article at About.com.

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Canon Pixma MX532 Wireless Office All-in-One Printer Review and RatingsIn reviewing 2013’s Canon Pixma MX522 Wireless Office All-in-One Printer, the top-of-the-line model in a series of entry-level, office-centric multifunction printers, we groused that the MX522 was essentially 2012’s Pixma MX512 with minimal changes and a new name. Now, incremental improvements aren’t necessarily a bad thing, but Canon’s problem with this approach is that, especially after a few years of relying on the same print engine, you start to fall behind. Most of the other major printer makers—HP, Epson, and Brother—have released newer, faster, and slicker business all-in-ones (AIOs) in the same period.

Canon Pixma MX532

Upon hearing that the Pixma MX522 was to be replaced by the MX532, we couldn’t help but wonder if the series would finally get overhauled—with, perhaps, a faster print engine and a few other less significant upgrades. After putting it through our review wringer, though, we can report that the $149.99-list Canon Pixma MX532 is, except for a few minor changes and feature updates, essentially the MX522 in new wrapping. In terms of speed and print quality, it performed close enough to last year’s model for the speed differences to be negligible.

Also updated at the same time as the Pixma MX532 was its less-expensive sibling, the $99.99-list Pixma MX472, a somewhat stripped-down office model. What you get for the additional $50 in the Pixma MX532 is the ability to print from and scan to USB thumb drives, as well as automatic two-sided printing, Bluetooth support, and several mobile-printing features (which we’ll look at more closely in the Design & Features section on the next page). Unless you decisively don’t need any of these features, they do seem well worth the additional $50.

Canon Pixma MX532 (Front View)

That said, that extra $50 on the price lands the Pixma MX532 in a more competitive league than Canon’s $100 model would be in, and thus it gets graded on a tougher curve. These new Pixmas both use the semi-inefficient two-tank ink system that their predecessors did, which means that they also deliver the same high ongoing per-page cost of operation—for both colorand black-and-white pages. (We’ll discuss cost per page, or CPP, in more detail in the Setup & Paper Handling section later in this review.) In fact, in addition to the sluggish printing, those high CPPs make these entry-level models unsuitable for small and home offices that have anything other than light to moderate print loads.

On the other hand, the Pixma MX532 churns out decent-looking documents, and its photos look pretty good, too, given that this is an entry-level, business-centric model. It comes with most of the productivity and convenience features that you can reasonably expect in an all-in-one printer of this price, including the Big Four main functions (print/scan/copy/fax). And it’s very easy to use.

The problem is that so many other faster, cheaper-to-use competitors are available that print just as well. This Pixma seems a bit long in the tooth by comparison. Still, the Pixma MX532 is a well-built, reliable, and reasonably attractive AIO, even though it’s a little costly to use and slow to print. If you don’t need to print a lot overall, the Pixma MX532 is a sensible choice, especially if you can find it discounted.

Read entire review at Computer Shopper.

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Epson WorkForce WF-3640 All-in-One PrinterEarlier this month (June 2014), Epson released eight new printers based on its new PrecisionCore technology. Two of them, the $169.99-list WorkForce WF-3620 All-in-One and the $199.99-list WorkForce WF-3640 All-in-One (the subject of this review), are small- and home-based office multifunction office printers. The primary difference between them, what you get for the additional $30, is that the more-expensive WF-3640 has two paper drawers.

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Top Wide Format (Tabloid) PrintersOne of the more recent trends among printer makers is to offer wide-format (11×17- and 13×19 inches) printers—both single-function and multifunction all-in-one (AIO) machines. If you’re not familiar with the benefits of tabloid (11×17) and supertabloid (13×19) printers and how they can help increase your productivity (not to mention your advertising options), check out this About.com “Wide Format Printers” article.

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Brother MFC-J6920DW Wide Format MFPUntil recently, Brother made most of the wide-format, or tabloid (11×17 inches) printers on the market. Nowadays, though, most of the other major printer makers are offering several models that can print oversize pages. Still, when it comes to full-featured business-oriented multifunction (print/copy/scan/fax), Brother’s tabloid printers, like one I’m reviewing here, the $299.99-list MFC-J6920DW, provide exceptional value.

Read the entire review on About.com.

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PC-Free Printing, Scanning, & CopyingIf you’ve shopped online or read the hype on the displays in brick ‘n’ mortar stores, surely you’ve seen one of the latest buzz terms—“PC-free” operation. What this means, of course, is that you can perform functions on the printer without having to send data or commands to it from a computer. But what does that mean? Well, with today’s multifunction printers (MFPs), PC-free can mean everything from scanning to and printing from memory devices, to printing from mobile devices and the cloud, as well as printing and scanning with printer apps.

Read the entire article at About.com.

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Auto-Duplexing ADFs and Print EnginesPrinters that can print two-sided pages automatically—and nowadays most but the least expensive can—have been with us for a while. These printers are said to be auto-duplexing, which means they have a device near the end of the paper path that grabs the page and automatically flips it over, so that it can run back through the printing apparatus to print the other side of the page. Not everybody prints two-sided pages, but having the ability to make doing so automatic surely must ensure that a lot more people do, and using half the paper most of the time must be good for just about everybody.

Read entire article at About.com.

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Epson Workforce 840 - high quality printing, copying and faxing at respectable speeds.

Business-oriented all-in-one inkjets range in features, capacity and price, from the $80-list Canon Pixma MX392 to HP’s $800-list Officejet Pro X576dw Multifunction Printer. Whether you’re small- or medium-size business (SMB) prints only a few pages per month, or thousands, the right printer is out there for you. Here are some good-value suggestions.

 

http://printscan.about.com/od/aioInkjets/tp/Top-Business-Inkjet-AIOs.htm

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