Review of the Microsoft Wireless Comfort Desktop 5050 at Digital TrendsIf you, like us, spend a good portion of your life banging on computers, the first thing you do after buying a new PC is replace the stock USB keyboard, and mouse that comes with it. Upgrading to aftermarket peripherals such as, say, the Microsoft Wireless Comfort Desktop 5050 review unit we have here, not only improves the aesthetics of your desktop and increases comfort, but can also be a wise investment in the well-being of your wrists and hands.

Compared to some other keyboard and mouse combos we’ve looked at recently, including the Logitech Performance MK850 Wireless Mouse and Keyboard Combo ($80), Microsoft’s Desktop 5050 is relatively inexpensive. It lists for $70, but we found it at several outlets for $50. While the Logitech MK850 specializes in allowing you to pair with multiple devices simultaneously, the Desktop 5050, in addition to its ergonomic design, comes with several additional keys for assigning shortcuts in Windows. Does it, however, provide enough comfort and convenience to warrant laying out half a C-note?

See the entire review at Digital Trends


 

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When it comes to wireless keyboards, or keyboard-and-mouse combo sets (also known as “wireless desktops”), most people think of Logitech and its many retail-friendly, budget bundles it has offered over the years, as well as Microsoft, perhaps, and its often ergonomically focused gear. On the other hand, one of the oldest (and one of the standards-bearers among desktop input-device makers) is Cherry, a German company.

Cherry Professional Wireless Rechargeable B.Unlimited AES (JD-0400EU-2)

Cherry has been manufacturing wireless keyboards, mice, and keyboard-and-pointing-device bundles for quite some time. But you may not have known it, because most of the stuff is meant for the professional and office markets.

Cherry’s also known for setting industry standards in input devices. It’s best known to consumers as the maker of the seminal Cherry MX mechanical key switches, the mechanisms that come in a small assortment of types (Cherry MX Blue, MX Red, and the like) and lie under the keytops of many of today’s best and priciest gaming and productivity keyboards for desktop PCs. The thing that may be confusing: Cherry makes lots of its own branded keyboards, but they don’t all, by a long shot, use those premium Cherry MX mechanical switches. In fact, most don’t.

Cherry offers a keyboard or combo set for lots of different categories of computing, including point of sale (POS), healthcare, government, and industrial, as well as yet another broad category, “professional,” which can, of course, mean just about anything. But what Cherry means, in this case, are professional typists, writers, data-entry professionals—people who use their input devices essentially to make a living. And for a subset of them—users who need to rely on bulletproof data security in data entry—the company offers up its $97-MSRP B.Unlimited AES desktop set. (It’s also known as the “Cherry Professional Wireless Rechargeable Desktop Set B.Unlimited AES.”)

So what, besides responsive, comfortable keys and an accurate, ergonomic mouse, does a professional need? Well, that certainly depends on what kind of professional you are. If you work in healthcare, where personal info is sacrosanct and subject to regulations, or in professions where you can’t even tell your spouse exactly what you do, locking down your data input at every possible weak point in the computing chain may matter to you. If that’s you, according to Cherry your relatively expensive professional desktop set should be Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) compliant, which secures the wireless signal between keyboard and receiver.

This keyboard/mouse set is also rechargable, which is well and good, but a $100 wireless-desktop set should be, we think, also comfortable and complete by default. While overall this is a well-built, high-end set, it provides little in the way of wrist support or other ergonomic features that you may see in other such bundles from Microsoft or Logitech.

Even so, we found Cherry’s B.Unlimited desktop set had decent key feel and felt sturdy, and the unusual AES angle makes it a good fit for security-minded, can’t-fail environments.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper.

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