Review of the Epson WorkForce ET-4750 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Excellent output quality. Very low running costs after initial investment. Ships with generous amount of ink. Supports Wi-Fi Direct mobile connectivity. Small and light.

  • CONS

    Slow for the price. High purchase price. Automatic document feeder (ADF) is not auto-duplexing. No NFC support.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson ET-4750 EcoTank AIO printer may be a bit slow, but it prints excellent quality documents and photos at a very low cost per print.

Depending on how much you use it, the Epson WorkForce ET-4750 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer ($499.99) ($399.99 at Amazon) is either a wise investment or a waste of money. Like the WorkForce ET-4550 ($548.88 at Amazon) before it, or its direct competitor, the Canon Pixma G4200 Wireless MegaTank All-in-One Printer (Check on Amazon at Amazon), the ET-4750 is a supertank, or bulk ink printer. Supertank all-in-one (AIO) printers are marketed under the pay-more-up-front-to-pay-less-for-ink-later model. Aside from the way you buy and feed it ink, though, the ET-4750 is roughly a pared-down equivalent to the Editors’ Choice Epson WorkForce Pro WF-4720.(Check on Amazon at Amazon) It’s slow and short on features for a $500 AIO, but it prints quite well, and the ongoing per-page price of ink is minuscule, making it an excellent choice for home-based or small offices or workgroups that need to print or copy from several hundred to a thousand or so pages each month.
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Canon Pixma TS3120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One at PCMag

  • PROS

    Low price. Compact and light. Bluetooth 4.0 support. Good print quality overall.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder. Only two ink cartridges. Lacks SD card and USB thumb drive support. High cost per page. Maximum 5-by-7-inch photo output size. Slow document printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The budget-friendly Canon Pixma TS3120 prints text, graphics and photos well enough, but its low price also means having to forgo some convenient features.

The Canon Pixma TS3120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($79.99) ($59.00 at Amazon) is one of very few inkjet printers with the distinction of a sub-$80 list price (and its street price of $49.99 means that you can actually buy it for less than $50, making it all the more unique). Not only is this one of the least-expensive consumer-grade photo all-in one (AIO) printers we’ve reviewed recently, it’s also one of the smallest, slowest, and shortest on features. Like the HP DeskJet 3755, the TS3120 is designed for families and homes that do very little printing and copying—a sort of there-when-you-need-it device. In that role, it’s a lower-cost alternative to the Canon Pixma TS5020 or the significantly more-expensive Editors’ Choice Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless 
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One at PCMag

  • PROS

    Lightweight and compact. Two additional ink cartridges for higher-quality photos. Two paper input trays. SD card, Ethernet, and Bluetooth 4.0 support. Excellent print quality. Fast snapshot printing.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder. Lacks NFC and Wi-Fi Direct. Slow document printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Though it lacks an automatic document feeder, the six-ink Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One printer produces exceptional text, graphics, and photos.

The flagship model in Canon’s Pixma TS-series consumer-grade photo all-in-one (AIO) inkjet printers, the Canon Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($199) ($149.99 at Amazon) replaces the Pixma TS9020 ($64.99 at Amazon) we reviewed earlier this year. Like its sibling, the Pixma TS8020, ($107.95 at Amazon) a top pick, the TS9120 is a six-ink machine designed to print primarily photographs, and that it does quite well. It prints and copies documents well, too, but sluggishly, compared with its business-oriented counterparts, and it lacks an automatic document feeder (ADF). However, its outstanding output quality, larger display, and Ethernet support for just $20 more than the Canon TS8020 makes it well-deserving of our Editors’ Choice as a consumer-grade photo and occasional document printer for home and family use.
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Canon Pixma TS6120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One at PCMag

  • PROS

    Takes up little space. Five ink cartridges for higher-quality text and photos. Two paper-input trays. Bluetooth 4.0 support. Excellent print quality, especially photos. Prints photos fast.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder, SD card or USB thumb drive support. Lacks NFC and Wi-Fi Direct. Slow document printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Canon Pixma TS6120 prints exceptional text, graphics and photos, but an automatic document feeder, memory drive support, and lower running costs would make it more attractive.

Part of a recent debut of five new TS-series Pixmas, the Canon Pixma TS6120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($149.99) ($99.99  at Amazon) replaces the Pixma TS6020 as a low-volume photo-centric all-in-one (AIO) printer for family and home office use. Aside from the addition of Bluetooth and a few other small tweaks, the TS6120 isn’t much different from its predecessor. It looks and prints the same, and at the same speeds, for the same list price, which is about $50 less than the Editors’ Choice Canon Pixma TS9120. Like most consumer-grade photo printers in this price range, the TS6120 is slow, and it has no automatic document feeder (ADF). It prints quite well, though—especially photos—making it a sensible lower-cost alternative to the pricier and more-expensive-to-use Canon TS9120.
Read the entire review at PCMag

Review of the Canon Pixma TS8120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One at Computer ShopperIt’s been less than a year since we reviewed Canon’s last round of TS-series Pixma printers, which included the Pixma TS8020 Wireless Inkjet All-In-One.($107.95 at Amazon) That model is the precursor to the machine we’re reviewing here, the $179.99-MSRP Pixma TS8120 ($149.00 at Amazon).

It’s unusual for a printer maker to refresh its line so soon. Speculating why Canon did so here would be, well, speculation. All we know for sure? Earlier in 2017, the Pixma TS series replaced the company’s MG-series Pixmas, a line of long-in-the-tooth photo-centric all-in-ones (AIOs) that we’ve reviewed year after year throughout the ’10s. Perhaps Canon felt that the first round of the new TS series wasn’t quite right. Or perhaps evolving market trends tipped the imaging giant’s hand.

In any case, the Pixma TS8120 is second from the top dog in Canon’s recent TS-line upgrade. This new line of five printers comprises the Pixma TS9120  ($199 MSRP, discounted to $149.99 as we wrote this in mid-October 2017) ($149.99 at Amazon), today’s Pixma TS8120 (discounted at many e-tailers to $149.99) ($149.00 at Amazon), the Pixma TS6120 ($149.99 MSRP, discounted to $99.99) ($99.99 at Amazon), the Pixma TS5120 ($99.99 MSRP, discounted to $89.99) ($89.00 at Amazon), and an all-new entry-level iteration, the Pixma TS3120 ($89.99 MSRP, discounted to $59.99).($59.00 at Amazon) We’ll be reviewing four of the five; this is the first in our Canon review wave.

All but that last one are updates to existing models. And, as usual, from top to bottom, as the prices shrink, so do the feature sets. For a $20 higher list price than the Pixma TS8120, for example, the Pixma TS9120 adds Ethernet connectivity and has a 5-inch display, whereas the Pixma TS8120 does not support wired networking and comes with a 4.3-inch screen.

Canon Pixma TS8120 (SD Card Front)

Because these models are positioned as photo printers, how well they print photos is paramount to everything else. As we’ve seen over the years, five- and six-ink printers tend to do a better job of printing across a wider variety of photos than standard four-ink (cyan, magenta, yellow, and black, or CMYK) machines. With that in mind, the two top TS Pixmas, the TS9120 and TS8120, use six inks; the next two down the chain (the TS6120 and TS5120) use five inks; and the TS3120 uses the standard four inks.

A change this time around is that instead of the “photo gray” ink that six-ink Pixmas have been using for the past several years, the sixth ink is now a “photo blue.” Where the photo gray ink was claimed to increase the color gamut (or color range) somewhat and help print superior gray-scale images, the new photo blue, according to Canon, reduces graininess. (We assume that the photo blue ink should increase the color range, too.)

The TS8120 comes in three colors: black, red, and white, as shown below. Canon sent us the red one…

Canon Pixma TS8120 (Colors)

A standing difference between consumer-grade photo AIOs and their office-oriented counterparts is that the former generally cost more to use: The per-page ink cost is higher. Canon’s photo-centric Pixmas traditionally have had slightly higher running costs than their competitors, and printed some of the best-looking images among consumer-grade photo printers. Nothing has really changed on those fronts.

Whether the Pixma TS8120 is right for you depends on several factors. Positioned as a photo printer foremost, not only does it cost more to use than some other inkjet AIOs, but it also lacks an automatic document feeder (ADF) for sending multi-page documents to the scanner. ADF AWOL is not unusual with this class of printer, especially those under $200. That trend has begun to change of late, though, with newer models such as the HP Envy Photo 7855 All-in-One ($199.99 at Amazon); we’ll look a little closer at this important development in the next section.

Canon Pixma TS8120 (Mobile)

The bottom line on the Pixma TS8120? If you’re looking for a machine mainly for printing photos, it’s hard to beat this little AIO (aside from getting the stepped-up Pixma TS9120, which we’re also reviewing, or one of a few Epson photo-centric models to be discussed later). If, on the other hand, you also need your photo printer to be nimble at making copies, printing lots of documents, and scanning pages with regularity, the Pixma TS8120 has a few shortcomings in those areas.

How much should they affect your buying decision? That depends on just how much printing, copying, and scanning you need to do. Let’s dig in and judge.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper



 

Review of the Brother MFC-J5330DW AIO printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Competitively fast. Good overall print quality. Prints tabloid-size pages. Multiple connectivity options. Strong software bundle.

  • CONS

    Less-than-stellar graphics. Cost per page could be lower. Non-duplexing automatic document feeder (ADF).

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The business-oriented Brother MFC-J5330DW is a capable wide-format, low-volume color inkjet all-in-one printer. It’s relatively fast, and it prints fairly well overall, albeit with some flawed business graphics.

One of Brother’s Business Smart Pro inkjet all-in-one (AIO) printers, the MFC-J5330DW ($199.99) ($169.98 at Amazon) prints tabloid-size (11-by-17-inch) pages. Some other tabloid-size AIOs, such as the Brother MFC-J6930DW ($216.68 at Amazon) and the Editors’ Choice HP OfficeJet Pro 7740, (Check on Amazon at Amazon) not only print at tabloid size, but they also copy, scan, and fax those pages. In addition, where the HP 7740 and the Brother MFC-J6930DW come with auto-duplexing automatic document feeders (ADFs) for sending two-sided, multipage documents to the scanner without assistance, the MFC-J5330DW does not. Even so, the MFC-J5330DW prints well overall and is reasonably fast, and has a strong set of features and software, making it a solid choice for low-volume business printing in a home-based or small office or workgroup. It would also make a good personal AIO if you have the space for it.
Read the entire review at PCMag

Editors' ChoicePROS

  • Excellent print quality. Light and compact. SD card slot. Ethernet support. Two black inks. Two paper input trays. 20-sheet ADF. XXL ink cartridges available.

  • CONS

    A little pricey. Somewhat high running costs.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    It may be a little pricey, but the Canon Pixma TR8520 all-in-one printer produces terrific text, graphics and photos, and it has a strong feature set.

Earlier this year, Canon replaced its outdated cube-shaped MG-series (consumer-grade photo) Pixma printers with new TS-series Pixma models. Meanwhile, the Pixma TR8520 Wireless Home Office All-in-One Printer ($199.99) ($149.99 at Amazon), one of two models in the Canon’s TR series (it has a slightly lower-end sibling, the soon-to-be-reviewed Pixma TR7520), edges out the past-its-prime MX-series (family and home-based office) Pixmas. Specifically, the TR8520 replaces the Editors’ Choice Pixma MX922.($69.95 at Amazon) The TR8520 all-in-one printer is smaller than the Canon MX922, redesigned in and out, and supports Bluetooth, making it our new top pick for family and home-based office, low-volume printing and copying.
Read the entire review at PCMag


My review of Epson Expression Photo XP-8500 Small-in-One at Computer ShopperWhen you stop and think about it, some of the things that our PCs, smartphones, and tablets allow us to do truly are amazing. Printing exquisite-looking photos on small, inexpensive inkjet printers is one of them. It’s not just having the ability to print photos that’s so awesome, though. What’s even more incredible is, when everything comes together just right—stunning content, taken in the right lighting, printed with a quality machine on premium photo paper—how striking the results can be.

It’s no wonder, then, that printing photos at home has become so popular, and that three of the top inkjet-printer makers—Canon, Epson, and HP—all offer machines tweaked and marketed as photo printers. If you choose the right one and feed it with the right ink, paper, and digital data, churning out masterpieces of your own isn’t particularly difficult, even if it costs a little more per photo than at Costco or the corner drug store.

You must start with the right printer, though. Today’s review unit, the $249.99-MSRP Epson Expression Photo XP-8500 Small-in-One ($199.99 at Amazon), may face some impressive competitors, but it’s got some fight in it. A newcomer to Epson’s established Small-in-One line of all-in-one (AIO) printers (in this case, it prints, copies, and scans), the XP-8500 has photo quality that’s among the best in its class.

Epson Expression Photo XP-8500 (Control Panel)

But that doesn’t necessarily make your printer-picking decision easy. During the past year, Canon has released a wave of highly capable photo-centric models in its Pixma TS- and Pixma G-series MegaTank lines, while HP has trotted out its Envy Photo 7855 ($199.99 at Amazon) and a couple of other Envy Photo models. And Epson’s own Expression Premium and Expression Photo brands boast some formidable photo printers of their own. (Prior to the XP-8500, it had been a while since we’d seen a new Expression Photo model.)

The XP-8500 is a six-ink printer; the additional inks help increase detail and extend the printer’s color range. In just the six-ink category alone, you will find the Canon Pixma TS9020 ($64.99 at Amazon) and Pixma TS8020 ($107.95 at Amazon) (as well as the just-released Pixma TS9120 and Pixma TS8120, which we’ll be reviewing in the coming weeks), as well as the Epson Expression Photo XP-960 ($220.00 at Amazon). And, while they vary in features and capacity (the XP-960 can print tabloid-size 11×17-inch photos, for example), guess what? They all print mighty good photos.

A step down from those are Canon’s and Epson’s five-ink photo printers, which include the Pixma TS6020 ($49.99 at Amazon), Pixma TS6120, Pixma TS5020 (Check on Amazon at Amazon), and TS5120, as well as the Expression Photo XP-860 ($220.00 at Amazon). The Canon G-series MegaTank printers (there are four of them, as of this writing) and the HP Envy Photo models (three of these) use only four inks, but they still print respectable photos. Our point? The XP-8500 has, by our count, more than 15 in-market rivals. (And there are other so-called “photo printers” out there beyond these.) Granted, as mentioned, they come at varying prices with a wide range of features. But many of them print photos comparable to what we saw from the XP-8500, and to each other.

So, for this review (and the Canon Pixmas coming up), we have our work cut out for us, without turning these comparisons into the War and Peace of consumer-grade photo printers. What we cansay at the start, though: Versus its most direct competitors, we didn’t come up with any compelling reasons not to buy the XP-8500 for churning out your keeper photos. This is one terrific little AIO.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper



 

Review of the HP Officejet Pro 7720 Wide-Format All-in-One on Computer ShopperEach year, due primarily to Brother (and to a lesser degree, to HP), the stable of available tabloid-capable (11×17-inch) all-in-one (AIO) printers widens. Many of them can print, copy, scan, and fax, and the AIOs themselves get less expensive to buy and to use.

Nearly all of Brother’s Business Smart Plus AIOs, among them the Brother MFC-J5830DW ($199.99 at Amazon), support at least tabloid-size printing, and several, including the recent Editors’ Choice Brother MFC-J6935DW ($318.00 at Amazon), come with scanners and automatic document feeders (ADFs) that can handle wide documents for scans, copies, and faxes.

While Brother makes many wide-format printers with a myriad of feature configurations, HP up until now offered only one, the Officejet Pro 7740 (Check on Amazon at Amazon), that had the ability to print, copy, scan, and fax in tabloid. Now, though, the Palo Alto printer giant is offering a pared-down version of the 7740, the $199.99-list Officejet Pro 7720.($199.99 at Amazon) It’s different from the 7740 in several key ways. The newer model, for instance, comes with only one 250-sheet paper-input tray, versus the 7740’s two 250-sheet cassettes.

The biggest difference between these two Officejets, though, is that the newer one has a smaller scanner and ADF, rendering it capable of copying, scanning, and faxing only legal-size (8.5×14-inch) pages. Aside from the smaller paper-input capacity and the inability to run tabloid-size pages through the ADF and scanner, though, these two Officejets are the spitting image of each other. But as you’ll see as you read on, what you give up for the $50 list price difference between them is significant.

We should pause here to add that Epson, too, makes a few wide-format printers meant for small businesses or workgroups, including the WorkForce WF-7610 All-in-One ($232.08 at Amazon), the WorkForce WF-7620 All-in-One (Check on Amazon at Amazon), and the WorkForce ET-16500 EcoTank Wide-Format All-in-One Supertank ($799.99 at Amazon). The difference between the first two is that the latter comes with two 250-sheet paper drawers, while the former has only one. The ET-16500 is one of Epson’s “bulk ink” AIOs that comes with tens of thousands of pages’ worth of ink in the box, and, as a result, it lists for about $1,000.

HP OfficeJet Pro 7720 (Introduction)

Another significant distinction between the Epson models, compared to the HP and Brother AIOs, is that all three of them print wide-format pages up to 13×19 inches, instead of 11×17. All three are simply WorkForce models rather than WorkForce Pro AIOs, meaning that their printheads contain fewer ink-nozzle chips (two chips, as opposed to the four on the WorkForce Pro models’ printheads). In addition, the WF-7610 and WF-7620 have been around since 2014; they lack a few recent mobile-connectivity and other features, and, as we’ll discuss later, they have substantially higher running costs.

In any case, back to the Officejet Pro 7720, the newest of the bunch. As mentioned, you give up a fair bit versus the Officejet Pro 7740, including the features listed earlier, as well as an ADF capable of scanning and copying two-sided pages automatically. On the other hand, the footprint and price are both smaller, and you get the same exceptional print and copy quality. The 7740 is a highly capable wide-format inkjet with many desirable attributes, and so goes the 7720. Nowadays, though, the competition among tabloid-size inkjet AIOs is brisker than ever.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper



 

Review of HP Envy Photo 7855 All-in-One at Computer ShopperIt’s been a couple of years since we’ve reviewed one of HP’s Envy-brand all-in-one (AIO) inkjet printers. The last one, the Envy 7640 e-All-in-One ($199.99 at Amazon), was a predecessor to (or at least, in the same series as) the model we’re reviewing here today, the $199-list HP Envy Photo 7855 All-in-One.

Why has it been so long? Well, frankly, there just haven’t been new Envy models to review until now, in late summer 2017. Part of a multi-device rollout that includes the $129-MSRP Envy Photo 6200 All-in-One and the $149-list Envy Photo 7100 All-in-One, the Envy Photo 7855  is the flagship model in this new line.

As the highest-numbered AIO of the bunch, the Envy Photo 7855, as you’d expect, costs the most and gets the most robust set of features. It has, for instance, an automatic document feeder (ADF) for sending multipage originals to the scanner, rather than making you place them on the platen one at a time. In fact, the Envy Photo 7855’s feature set, which includes several functions its less-expensive siblings don’t have&mdashmemory device support, fax, Ethernet, an automatic extending output tray, and support for legal-size paper—is somewhat lopsided, especially given the $50 list-price difference between it and the next-step-down Envy Photo 7100.

We’ll take a closer look at the Photo 7855’s features in the next section. As context, first: By positioning these new Envy models as photo printers, HP has put them toe-to-toe with some formidable competition from two of its major competitors, Canon and Epson. The competing families are, namely, Canon’s photo-centric Pixma TS-series and Epson’s Expression Photo models. These include the six-ink Canon Pixma TS9020 Wireless Inkjet All-In-One ($64.99 at Amazon) and the five-ink Epson Expression Photo XP-860 Small-in-One.($229.99 at Amazon)

These, and several others in both Canon’s and Epson’s stables of consumer-grade photo inkjets, churn out superb photos. One of the questions addressed in the Output Quality section near the end of this review is whether HP’s more traditional four-ink (cyan, magenta, yellow, and black) Envy Photo models are capable of the same brilliant and highly detailed photo output as its five- and six-ink competitors are.

From HP’s POV, the company says a reformulated black ink and some other tweaks make these new photo-centric HP AIOs highly capable photograph printers, too. That said, these so-called photo printers don’t use separate cartridges for each ink, with HP instead deploying a two-cartridge system consisting of one filled with black ink and another holding the other three inks. That’s a system most other inkjet makers have gotten away from, primarily because when one of the reservoirs on the three-ink tank empties before the other two, the entire cartridge must be discarded, thereby wasting ink.

HP says that it has successfully addressed this issue with a new technology it calls Active Ink Balancing Technology, or AIB. According to HP, AIB “…tracks how you are printing. If you are printing a lot of magenta, for instance, it would use CY [cyan and yellow inks], then, on non-PQ [Printer Quality] needed projects (like a word document, not a photo) so that your colors in the IPH [cartridge] all run out closer together.”

We have no scientific way to test this, of course. However, in answer to our question, “What if the user prints a lot of images containing high concentrations of blue sky or water, thereby requiring a disproportionate amount of cyan ink (or other like scenarios)?” HP said that AIB technology can’t compensate for extreme situations like this. In other words, it can’t perform miracles.

One thing that most so-called photo printers have in common, including the Envy Photo 7855, is high per-page ink costs. As we’ll discuss later on, though, the Envy Photo 7855 and its siblings are Instant Ink-ready, meaning that they support HP’s Instant Ink subscription service, one of the least-expensive ways that we know of to print photographs. It breaks out like this, but we’ll get into the details later…

HP Envy Photo 7855 (Instant Ink)

And that&mdashthe ability to print good-looking photographs for literally a few pennies each&mdashis without question a good reason for choosing the Envy Photo 7855 over its competitors, especially if you intend to print a lot of images. With the Envy Photo 7855, you might give up some image quality, but what you’d save on ink each month (and over the life of the printer) could save you a pile of money over time.

Read entire review at Computer Shopper