Review of the HP PageWide Pro 750dw at Computer ShopperLet’s say that your organization (or your very, very busy home office) needs to churn out 20,000 or so high-quality prints each month, and some of them (perhaps all of them) must be tabloid-size (11×17 inches). You’re considering purchasing one of Brother’s Business Smart Plus all-in-one (AIO) printers—maybe our highly capable Editors’ Choice pick, MFC-J6935DW, or perhaps the HP Officejet Pro 7740 Wide-Format All-in-One. And why not? Both are logical choices: They print exceptional tabloid-size pages, and they both have maximum monthly duty cycles of 30,000 pages—10,000 pages more than what you need to print, right?

Well, not so fast.

Let’s start with that 30,000-page monthly duty cycle. The more important number—the one not printed on the box—is the recommended monthly page volume, which on the Brother machine we mentioned above is up to 2,000 pages monthly. The Officejet’s recommended volume is up to 1,500 pages per month. As well-built as these machines are, if you actually pushed them to their maximum monthly duty cycle rating each month, you’d likely be shortening their service life. But that’s not all.

Some rough napkin math: Printing 20,000 pages per month, excluding weekends and holidays, comes out to about 1,000 pages per workday. (30,000 pages per month equals about 1,500 pages per day.) If you used one of these midrange business printers to churn out these kinds of volumes, day in and day out, you’d have to fill their paper drawers several times a day, and—especially if you’re printing wide-format, which uses about twice the ink as a standard letter-size page, all else being equal—you’d be changing the ink cartridges twice a day, perhaps more. If you truly require this kind of volume, especially on tabloid-size pages, you need a machine designed to handle this much printing. And that is where a model like the $2,199 HP PageWide Pro 750dw we’re reviewing here today comes in.

HP PageWide Pro 750dw (USB)

Yes, that’s a lot of money for a printer, especially an inkjet printer. But as you read on, you’ll see that, first, HP PageWide printers are not ordinary inkjet printers, and the PageWide Pro 750dw is no ordinary PageWide machine.

In fact, given its size, volume, and some other specs, we think that it’s better suited to HP’s PageWide Enterprise line, like the HP PageWide Enterprise Color 556dn reviewed at our sister site, PCMag, a while back. The PageWide Pro 750dw is, for example, designed to support up to 40 networked users, rather than the five or so users recommended for the smaller inkjets we’ve been talking about.

In fact, the PageWide Pro 750dw is much more in line with a high-volume color laser printer, such as the Dell Color Smart Printer S5840Cdn we reviewed late last year. A primary difference between it and the 750dw is, of course, that the HP model can print at sizes up to tabloid, which is one reason the PageWide model costs so much. High-volume laser-class printers that can do wide-format, such as the OKI C831n ($1,699 MSRP) and OKI C831dn ($1,929), and wide-format laser alternatives (such as our 750dw), typically have high price tags. But the good news is, at least in the case of the HP model, is that its running costs are reasonable once you’ve bought the printer.

In addition, the PageWide Pro 750dw is highly expandable. You can boost the paper capacity, as we’ll discuss later on, over 4,000 sheets. Plus, according to HP, in the fall of 2017 numerous copier-like finishing options (among them a stapler and a collator) will come available.

The PageWide Pro 750dw is an immense, and immensely well-built, volume printer meant to endure blizzards of wide-format printing month after month. Our only real quibble with it is that it’s somewhat expensive. But then, if you plan to print upward of 10,000 pages each month, you need a Humvee, not a Chevy Silverado.

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Review of the HP OfficeJet Pro 8216 at PCMagEssentially a two-drawer version of the HP OfficeJet Pro 8210, the OfficeJet Pro 8216 ($179.99) is notably slower than its less expensive sibling, but overall print quality is markedly better. A single-function color inkjet business printer, it’s comparable in features and capacity to the Editors’ Choice Canon Maxify iB4120 Wireless Small Office Inkjet Printer, but it costs a little more. The 8216 and Canon iB4120 deliver similar running costs, but the former is eligible for HP’s Instant Ink subscription service, which can save you a bunch on ink. While it doesn’t quite live up to the Canon model’s superior print quality, the OfficeJet Pro 8216 has many assets that make it an excellent alternative to a color laser.

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Review of the HP ScanJet Pro 4500 fn1 Network Scanner at PCMagThe flagship in HP’s line of flatbed ScanJet Pro document scanners, the 4500 fn1 Network Scanner ($899) is similar in many ways to the ScanJet Pro 3500 f1 Flatbed Scanner. Unlike its less-expensive sibling, though, the 4500 is networkable via both Ethernet and Wi-Fi, scans faster, and has a higher daily duty cycle. It’s also quicker than the Editors’ Choice Canon imageFormula DR-2020U, as well as the comparably priced Epson WorkForce DS-6500—especially when saving scans to searchable PDF files. Fast, single-pass scanning and swift saving to a usable file format, as well as built-in networking, easily elevate the ScanJet Pro 4500 to our Editors’ Choice for a flatbed document scanner for low-to-medium-volume scanning in a small office or workgroup.

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Review of the HP OfficeJet Pro 6978 All-in-One Printer at PCMagThe HP OfficeJet Pro 6978 All-in-One Printer ($179.99) offers a wealth of features, including an auto-duplexing automatic document feeder (ADF), which many of its competitors lack. Should you opt for HP’s Instant Ink ink subscription service, it delivers competitive running costs. These perks, along with good output quality for text, graphics, and photos, elevate the OfficeJet Pro 6978 to our new Editors’ Choice midrange all-in-one printer (AIO) for low- to medium-volume printing in small or micro offices and workgroups.

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Review of the HP ScanJet Pro 3000 s3 Sheet-Feed Scanner at PCMagThe HP ScanJet Pro 3000 s3 Sheet-Feed Scanner ($429.99) is a good value as a moderately priced desktop document scanner. An upgrade in capacity and features from the entry-level HP ScanJet Pro 2000 we reviewed recently, it is faster than the Editors’ Choice Canon imageFormula DR-C225 and the Brother ImageCenter ADS-2000e. The ScanJet 3000 includes a well-rounded software bundle, and, in testing, the hardware performed well. Optical character recognition (OCR) accuracy is about average, and speed is excellent. All this makes the ScanJet 3000 our new Editors’ Choice personal desktop document scanner, though it’s also good for a small or micro office or workgroup.

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Review of the HP ScanJet Pro 2000 s1 Sheet-feed Scanner at PCMagA recent addition to the ScanJet family, the ScanJet Pro 2000 s1 Sheet-feed Scanner ($299.99) is a capable low-volume document scanner comparable in capacity and features to the Editors’ Choice Canon imageFormula DR-C225, as well as the adept Brother ADS-2000e. The ScanJet 2000 is fast for the price, and its optical character recognition (OCR) accuracy is about average. It comes with a comprehensive software bundle consisting of top-drawer OCR and document and business card management programs, making it an exceptional value. In testing, it fell behind some competitors when saving to searchable PDF, but not enough to keep us from recommending it as a strong, inexpensive choice for small and micro offices and workgroups, or as a personal document scanner.

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HP LaserJet Pro MFP M130fw review at PCMagThe HP LaserJet Pro MFP M130fw ($259.99) is an inexpensive monochrome laser all-in-one printer (AIO) designed for micro- and home-office use. Given its compact size and feature set, it should perform well as a personal AIO, too. It’s significantly smaller and lighter than the Editors’ Choice Canon imageClass MF227dw, but even though both machines are similarly priced, the M130fw comes up short in a few key areas. It supports only manual duplexing, for instance, and has higher-than-average running costs. Even so, the LaserJet Pro M130fw is a solid choice overall for low-volume small and home-based office monochrome output, as well as moderate personal printing, copying, scanning, and faxing.

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Review of the HP Officejet Pro 7740 Wide-Format All-in-One Printer at Computer ShopperJust a few years ago, wide-format printers—which print to tabloid-size (11×17-inch) or larger paper—were seldom seen, and usually expensive. Nowadays, though, all of the major makers of inkjet printers (Brother, Canon, Epson, and HP) offer at least one in their consumer- and small-business-priced lines. Brother has gone in the biggest on wide-format, in that nearly all of its Business Smart models can print pages up to tabloid-size. And several such models, such as the Brother MFC-J6535DW, also scan and copy 11×17-inch pages.

So can the machine at the center of today’s review, HP’s $249.99-MSRP Officejet Pro 7740 Wide Format All-in-One. The ability to handle tabloid-size pages greatly increases your design options across a host of scenarios. It allows you, for example, to create spreadsheets twice the width of standard letter-size (8.5×11-inch) paper, as well as four-page (and larger) letter-size booklets, by simply printing two pages on each side and folding the sheet in the middle.

However, as we’ll get into later on, unlike some Brother models, the Officejet Pro 7740’s cost per page (CPP) is high—too high, in fact, for any kind of real printing in volume. On the other hand, the Epson WorkForce WF-7620 (a two-drawer version of the WorkForce WF-7610 that we reviewed a while back) has even higher running costs than the Officejet Pro 7740. The printer’s maximum monthly duty cycle (the number of pages HP says you can print safely each month) is 30,000 pages, but the recommended monthly page limit is a mere 250 to 1,500 pages. That said, that’s less a cause for concern than it might seem at first. Given this Officejet model’s CPP figures, printing a few hundred pages (say, up to 500) each month is the only practical use for it in terms of value for money.HP Officejet Pro 7740 Wide-Format (Front and Right)

A major difference between the Officejet Pro 7740 and competing Brother tabloid-capable models is that the former churns out better-looking business graphics and photos. Epson’s wide-format models, on the other hand, have comparable output to the Officejet Pro 7740, and they support pages up to 13×19 inches (also known as Super B or Super A3), making those machines’ output all the more versatile. (That also applies to the company’s much more expensive—$999.99 list—WorkForce Pro ET-16500 EcoTank Wide-Format All-in-One Supertank Printer.) The 13×19-inch format makes a decent-size poster, for instance.

Nowadays, finding a wide-format printer isn’t the issue; it’s finding the one that suits your needs, such as whether quality output supersedes the cost of use. In addition to superb print quality, the Officejet Pro 7740 has a wide range of mobile- and cloud-connectivity features, as well as a single-pass automatic document feeder (ADF) for faster, more efficient two-sided (duplex) scans.

We like this Officejet as a relatively low-volume tabloid printer, but you’ll get much more value from it if you can make use of some of its other features, too, such as scanning oversize media, employing the optical character recognition (OCR), and using the printer from your smartphone and the cloud.

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HP ScanJet Enterprise Flow 7000 s3 Sheet-Feed Scanner review at PCMagA step up from the $50-less-expensive HP ScanJet Enterprise 5000 s4, the ScanJet Enterprise Flow 7000 s3 Sheet-Feed Scanner ($849.99) scans faster and saves to image PDF quicker than many costlier competitors. But like many document scanners, including our Editors’ Choice, the Epson WorkForce DS-860, the ScanJet 7000 slows down considerably when saving scans to searchable PDF format—so much so that it’s not that much faster than the significantly lower-rated ScanJet 5000 when performing the same task. Even so, unlike some other competing models (including the DS-860), the ScanJet 7000 comes with both document management and business card archiving software, making it a terrific value and our new top choice for moderate to heavy-volume scanning in a medium-size office or workgroup.

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HP ScanJet Enterprise Flow 5000 s4 Sheet-Feed Scanner at PCMag.The HP ScanJet Enterprise Flow 5000 s4 Sheet-Feed Scanner ($799.99) is a relatively fast and capable scanner designed for midsize offices. It’s not quite as speedy as our Editors’ Choice, the Epson WorkForce DS-860,, but it does scan and save to both image and searchable PDF formats at a good clip, not to mention that it lists for nearly $400 less than the Epson model. The ScanJet 5000 also comes with both business card and document management software, which the Epson and several other competitors do not. Given its low price, speed, software bundle, and accuracy, it’s a good choice for moderate to heavy-duty scanning in a medium-size office.

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