My article on How to Recycle or Donate Your Old Printer at PCMag

Whether your trusty inkjet or laser has spit out its last page, or you’re just looking to upgrade, here’s how not to land your old printer in a landfill.

ByWilliam Harrel

Donate, Recycle, or Sell Your Old Printer?

Whether your printer is a lightweight budget inkjet or a bulky workhorse laser, a single-function printer or a versatile all-in-one (AIO), the time will come when you’ll need to find a responsible way to dispose of it. Maybe it broke down for good; maybe you’ve simply replaced it with a better model. Whatever the reason why you don’t need your printer any longer, getting rid of it responsibly means making sure it gets refurbished and put back into service, or that its materials get into the right recycling streams. Here’s how to make that happen.

Read the entire article at PCMag



 

Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Decent print quality for a Zink-based model. Makes slightly larger prints than Sprocket predecessor. App is easy to set up and use.

  • CONS

    Can’t print from a PC. Running costs, like with most Zink printers, are a bit high.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    An update to HP’s popular Sprocket portable photo printer, the Sprocket Plus prints larger pics, and its software packs a wide range of effects. It’s the most versatile model of its kind.

The HP Sprocket Plus ($149.99) is an update to the HP Sprocket portable photo printer we reviewed late last year. This newer iteration prints 30 percent larger photos (they are 2.3 by 3.4 inches, versus the original’s 2 by 3 inches), and the quality is better, too. The Sprocket and Sprocket Plus aren’t unique; they compete with similar products from Canon, Kodak, Lifeprint, Polaroid, and a few others. While most of these pocket photo printers, in terms of print quality, speed, and running costs, are near equals, the slightly bigger prints and the new functionality in its app set the Sprocket Plus apart from the pack—enough to elevate it to our latest Editors’ Choice for portable photo printers.

Read the entire review at PCMag



Review of the HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 All-in-One Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Fast. Impressive print quality. Highly competitive running costs. Very well-built. 50-sheet one-pass duplexing ADF. Laser-like security features. Versatile connectivity.

  • CONS

    Pricey compared with competitors. Support for borderless prints limited to A4 and letter-size. Only one paper input source.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 is an excellent inkjet all-in-one printer that’s up to the task of replacing the color laser AIO in your small office.

The HP OfficeJet Pro 8730 All-in-One Printer ($349.99) is a medium-volume business-oriented inkjet all-in-one (AIO) designed for small to midsize offices and workgroups, as well as home-based offices. It comes with a few more productivity and convenience features than the Editors’ Choice Epson WorkForce Pro WF-4720 does, such as an auto-duplexing (and higher-capacity) automatic document feeder (ADF), but it also lists for almost twice as much. Otherwise, the OfficeJet 8730 is fast, prints well, is better-constructed than most of its competitors, and it comes with a slew odf attractive features. If you can justify the higher price, it’s a terrific business-oriented all-in-one office appliance.Read the entire review at PCMag


Read the entire review of the HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M180nw at PCMag

  • PROS

    Good output quality. Reasonably fast. Small and light. Strong mobile connectivity. Low price.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder. No automatic two-sided printing. High cost per page.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The HP LaserJet Pro MFP M180nw is an entry-level color laser AIO that prints well and at a reasonable clip, but large-volume offices should note its high cost of consumables.

The HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M18s0nw ($299.99) is one of the smallest and least-expensive entry-level color laser all-in-one (AIO) printers we’ve recently seen. It’s a little bit slower than our current Editors’ Choice, the somewhat more expensive Canon Color imageClass MF634Cdw, and it prints as well, but the lack of an automatic document feeder (ADF) for sending multipage documents to the scanner, as well as a lofty per-page cost of consumables, should give pause to high-volume offices. Even so, its small footprint, strong print speed, and good output quality make it more than suitable as a personal color laser AIO for churning out low-volume prints and copies in a home-based business, or even a micro office or workgroup.

See the entire review at PCMag



Review of the HP OfficeJet 3830 All-in-One Printer at PCMag

    • PROS

      Very low price. Light and compact. Impressive print quality. Low running costs with Instant Ink. Good-looking photos on HP photo paper. 35-sheet automatic document feeder (ADF). Touch screen is an unexpected amenity.

    • CONS

      Running costs are exorbitant without Instant Ink. No auto-duplexing. Two-cartridge ink setup is potentially wasteful. Lacks flash memory support and Ethernet.

BOTTOM LINE

  • The low-price, entry-level HP OfficeJet 3830 prints well and at reasonable running costs—when you sign up for HP’s Instant Ink subscription program—but you give up some features and functionality for the savings.

The HP OfficeJet 3830 All-In-One Printer ($79.99), an entry-level inkjet all-in-one (AIO), is a capable machine, but like many AIOs in this class, including the more-expensive Canon Pixma TR8520 Wireless Home Office All-In-One Printer, our Editors’ Choice, it has many formidable competitors. Unlike the Canon TR8520, the OfficeJet 3830 does not support two-sided printing, Ethernet networking, flash memory devices, and a few other noteworthy features. What the OfficeJet 3830 does have going for it is that, not only does it cost less than the Canon model, it also costs less to use—as long as you opt for HP’s Instant Ink subscription program, that is. The OfficeJet 3830 prints well, and it’s a good alternative to the Canon TR8520 for low-volume printing and copying in a small or home-based office or student dormitory.

Read the entire review at PCMag


Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Fast scanning. High daily duty cycle. Robust software. Built-in tablet control panel, keyboard, and hard disk.

  • CONS

    Costly. Big and heavy.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The HP Digital Sender Flow 8500, with its tablet control panel and built-in keyboard and hard disk, is a powerful, if expensive, network document scanner for midsize to large offices.

High-end network document scanners continue getting slicker and more self-contained. The HP Digital Sender Flow 8500 fn2 Document Capture Workstation ($2,999.99) has sophisticated features including a built-in scanner interface and onboard hard disk for saving files. It may cost an eye-watering $1,000 more than the Editors’ Choice Canon imageFormula ScanFront 400, but it’s faster and richer in features, making it our top pick for high-volume scanning in a midsize to large office or enterprise setting.
Read the entire article at PCMag


  • PROSA review of the HP Envy Photo 6255 All-in-One Printer from PCMag

    Reasonable price. Attractive design. Low running costs with Instant Ink. Good overall print quality.

  • CONS

    Cost per page exceptionally high without Instant Ink. Banding in dark gradients and backgrounds. Wasteful two-cartridge ink system holds all four inks.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Envy Photo 6255 is a small, lightweight, and attractive consumer-grade AIO that prints good-looking photos and does so at highly competitive running costs, though only when you sign up for HP’s Instant Ink.

[amazon_link asins=’B074P569PP’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’53621d72-09cb-11e8-ab65-b7a3c8b48775′]The lower-end model in a trio of entry-level consumer-grade all-in-one (AIO)inkjet photo printers that HP released recently, the Envy Photo 6255 All-in-One Printer ($129.99) [amazon_link asins=’B074P569PP’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’79ed35da-09cb-11e8-8137-37873a0c94f6′] competes directly with the Editors’ Choice Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless Inkjet Printer,[amazon_link asins=’B074VFYB9J’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’9a7d3d92-09cb-11e8-be2c-87f015ab7942′] as well as a few others in the Pixma TS-series line. The Envy 6255 is a bit slower, shorter on features, and its photo print quality falls a little behind that of the Canon TS9120; on the other hand, when you pair it with HP’s Instant Ink subscription service, you get some of the lowest per-page running costs from a consumer-grade photo printer available, making the Envy 6255 an excellent alternative for homes and families who want to print a few hundred photos inexpensively.
Read the entire review at PCMags



 

  • Review of the HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M281fdw at PCMagPROS

Good output quality. Compact. Easy-to-navigate 5-inch color touch screen. Strong mobile connectivity. Supports USB thumb drive.

  • CONS

Somewhat high purchase price. No automatic document feeder. Lacks near-field communication (NFC). Slow for the price. Graphics and photo quality could be better.

  • BOTTOM LINE

An entry-level color laser AIO printer, the HP Color LaserJet Pro MFP M281fdw prints well overall, albeit somewhat expensively, making it a good fit for companies that don’t require more than a few hundred prints and copies each month.

[amazon_link asins=’B073RG8Z72′ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’aaeb5708-eff7-11e7-84cf-d1c3e8d3eaf5′]HP’s LaserJet Pro MFP M281fdw ($429.99) [amazon_link asins=’B073RG8Z72′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’9e584e95-eff6-11e7-91b2-7338ffdf32e4′] is an entry-level color laser all-in-one (AIO) printer similar in capacity, features, and price to our Editors’ Choice Canon Color imageClass MF634Cdw.[amazon_link asins=’B01LXTOHRJ’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’c70005b4-eff6-11e7-85b3-d78b40aec23c’] The M281fdw is smaller and lighter than the Canon model, and its running costs are a little lower. However, the Canon MF634Cdw prints better and comes with a stronger feature set, including a larger touch screen and an auto-duplexing automatic document feeder (ADF), which the M281fdw lacks. Even so, the M281fdw prints well overall, making it a decent alternative to the Canon MF634Cdw as a low-volume color laser AIO for home-based small offices and small workgroups, or for personal use.
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review ofhttps://www.pcmag.com/review/357753/alaris-s2070-scanner-by-kodak-alaris at PC

  • PROS

    Excellent OCR accuracy. Fast scanning. Relatively fast when saving to searchable PDF.

  • CONS

    Somewhat pricey. Software complicated to learn and implement. Expensive accessories.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Alaris S2070 Scanner by Kodak Alaris is reasonably fast and highly accurate, if not a bit expensive compared with like-priced competitors.

The Alaris S2070 Scanner by Kodak Alaris ($1,195) is a mid- to high-volume desktop sheet-feed document scanner. It’s fast and accurate, and it comes with a highly capable software bundle for not only scanning to popular file formats, but also for converting your scans to editable text and archiving them for easy indexing and retrieval. In many ways, the Alaris S2070 is just as capable (and in some ways slicker) than the Visioneer Patriot H60, our current top choice for moderate-to-high-volume document scanners for small and medium-size offices and workgroups. But the S2070’s higher price, lower scan volume, and slower speed capabilities render it just short of top marks.Read the entire review at PCMag



 

With all of the innovation going on in information technology these days, printers may not be the sexiest set of gear, but they remain one of the bedrocks. An absolute in the printer market nowadays is that, no matter what you pay for it—from $50 to $1,000 or more—your single-function or multifunction machine should print at least passably well, and it should perform like a champ—in terms of mechanical functionality, if not necessarily speed. Those are 2017’s printer table stakes.

Computer Shopper's Top 100 Tech Products of 2017: Printers

From small or home-based offices to huge enterprises and workgroups, an ongoing trend in printer technology over the past several years has been mobile connectivity—printing from and scanning to your smartphone, tablet, or laptop from virtually anywhere and everywhere. The year 2017 continues that trend, as well as the ongoing ink wars, in which printer makers promote various technologies and programs for providing lower-cost ink (or at least the illusion of it), especially among lower-end consumer and small-office all-in-ones (AIOs). The reality is that ink’s not really any cheaper, but these products do provide a lot more transparency into what it actually costs to keep your printer inked up.

Read the entire article at PCMag