INTEL DEMOS DIRECTX 12, WHICH LOOKS FASTER AND MORE EFFICIENT THAN DX11Two applications that never seem to have quite enough processing power are high-end multimedia editing, and gaming. In Windows, one of the key components of graphics processing in gaming is DirectX technology.

Currently, about 70 percent of Windows machines are running DirectX 11. However, at its Siggraph 2014 booth, Intel recently demoed DirectX 12, and the chip-maker claims that it will significantly increase performance, power efficiency, scalability, and portability.

You may be asking yourself why Intel was running the demo, though Microsoft was also part of the show. The test bed PC consisted of the original Surface Pro 3, which ran on Intel’s Core i5 CPU with integrated Intel HD 4400 graphics.

Read entire review at Digital Trends.

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Hands-On With the GeForce 600M Series

Somebody woke up the giant. In desktop and laptop PCs, it’s been a quiet last couple of years for Nvidia, but the big graphics powerhouse isn’t keeping it down any longer. Nvidia’s big-splash news in early 2012 was its new-to-market, long-awaited revision of its graphics architecture, code-named “Kepler.” Touted since 2010, Kepler showed up in the company’s speed-monster (but power-stingy) GeForce GTX 680 desktop video card, an able competitor to AMD’s best. (See our March 2012 review of the Nvidia GeForce GTX 680, as well as a look at AMD’s leading 2012 video card, the AMD Radeon HD 7970.)

In early March, two of our editors ventured to sunny San Francisco to attend Nvidia’s 2012 Editors’ Day conference, where the company gave us a sneak peek at the GTX 680. But there, they were surprised to see something that’s potentially even more of a game-changer: the GeForce 600M Series, a suite of new graphics-processing units (GPUs) for laptops.

Of course, manufacturers always tout new hardware of this kind as an epochal breakthrough, destined to change the tech landscape. Sometimes it’s true, sometimes, less so. This time, though, we have to say that the new graphics processors Nvidia showed us looked, at least from the claims on the table, nothing short of impressive. And our preliminary tests bear some of this out.

Read the full article at Computer Shopper.

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