Brother MFC-J775DW Review and Ratings at Computer ShopperTis the season of the low-cost, entry-level all-in-one (AIO) printer. Recently, we’ve reviewed models from Canon (the Pixma TS3120 Wireless All-in-One) [amazon_link asins=’B074VD1GGT’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’0fd14204-f0ad-11e7-8384-43025b845dd7′], HP (the DeskJet 2655 All-in-One [amazon_link asins=’B06XHXWB7B’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’27a20f2d-f0ad-11e7-ab5b-95bda7d75de2′] and DeskJet 3755 All-in-One) [amazon_link asins=’B01GAIU7HG’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’4d6d33a2-f0ad-11e7-9ef8-31d3904d7179′], and now Brother’s $149-street MFC-J775DW, today’s review model. While the Canon and HP machines cost under $100, and the MFC-J775DW [amazon_link asins=’B01D8O2VKQ’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’5b5cdbdd-f0ad-11e7-b9cc-4bfa9a11afb5′] costs more for the same speed ratings and capacities, the Brother costs significantly less to use.

[amazon_link asins=’B01D8O2VKQ’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’6e0bb99e-f0ad-11e7-8b46-99bcfa06c15f’]And that’s the primary reason the MFC-J775DW lists for more than $100. (Aside, perhaps, from its automatic document feeder, or ADF, for scanning multipage documents without assistance; most sub-$100 models lack one.) It is one of Brother’s INKvestment line of AIOs, the company’s response to Epson’s EcoTank and Canon’s MegaTank bulk-ink models, which ask you to pay more for the machine up front to save on the ongoing per-page price of ink. Hence, in our Cost Per Page section later on, we’ll show you how (in this printer’s case, anyway) paying an additional $50 or so for the printer itself could—if you use it enough—save you significantly in consumables over the life of the machine.

How do Brother’s INKvestment machines differ from MegaTank and EcoTank AIOs? The INKvestment models use typical ink cartridges, whereas the Canon and Epson machines get their ink from bottles. You use them to fill reservoirs built into the printers themselves. In addition, the Canon and Epson models come with enough ink in the box to churn out thousands of pages, compared to the MFC-J775DW’s initial 2,400 monochrome and 1,200 color pages.

Brother MFC-J775DW (Printer and Ink)

You can, by the way, buy an “XL” iteration of the MFC-J775DW that comes with three sets of cartridges, for three times the prints, for an additional $100. This puts the XL version in direct competition with Epson’s Expression ET-2600 EcoTank All-in-One [amazon_link asins=’B01N0GJFUH’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’9915a347-f0ad-11e7-ae47-552018496668′] and Canon’s Pixma G3200 Wireless MegaTank All-in-One.[amazon_link asins=’B07214SQW3′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’abb2802a-f0ad-11e7-a3b4-dfd45b7e2736′] (Neither of these has an ADF, whereas the MFC-J775DW does.)

Whether, by the way, you should buy the XL version or the non-XL model depends on how much you print. If you can afford the additional C-note, our calculations indicate that for the $100 more that you’d pay for the MFC-J775DW XL, you get about $138 worth of extra ink in the box. So it depends on how quickly you’ll use that ink; saving $38 over the course of a year or two isn’t as attractive as saving that amount over a two- or three-month period.

Brother specializes in serious business printers, and while the MFC-J775DW is technically an office printer, as opposed to a photo-centric family-oriented machine, it’s not anywhere near a heavy-duty workhorse. Despite its lower running costs, this is a low-volume machine, as measured by its 12-page-per-minute (ppm) print speed rating. Even so, it prints, copies, and scans well, and its ADF makes it much more suitable to office-minded tasks, such as copying and scanning multipage documents, than several competing models. Reasonable print speeds, good print quality, relatively low running costs, dependable operation, an automatic document feeder, and a two-year warranty make this AIO a good value.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper



 

  • Review of the Canon ImageClass D570 monochrome laser AIO at PCMagPROS

    Good overall print quality. Respectable print speed. Relatively low price. Two paper input sources.

  • CONS

    High running costs. Lacks automatic document feeder. No memory drive support.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Canon’s ImageClass D570 mono laser all-in-one printer produces good-looking text and passable graphics at a respectable speed for the price, but an ADF is sorely missing.

[amazon_link asins=’B06XY4B179′ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’79de44c2-c4af-11e7-b10b-31c86a0e7cd4′]A step down from the Editors’ Choice ImageClass MF249dw [amazon_link asins=’B01K9OM9NW’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’07d044fd-c4af-11e7-af19-dbf9e130b603′], the ImageClass D570 ($229.99)  [amazon_textlink asin=’B06XY4B179′ text=’D570′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’24c0b7a6-c4af-11e7-86c4-c9854c633799′] is an entry-level monochrome all-in-one (AIO) laser printer designed for use in a home-based or micro office, a small workgroup, or as a personal AIO. A significant difference between the D570 and its $299 sibling is that the latter comes with an automatic document feeder (ADF) for sending multipage documents to the scanner, whereas the former does not. In testing, the MF249dw and the D570 produced similar print quality. These two small laser AIOs have much in common, making the ImageClass D570 a decent less-expensive alternative to the MF249dw as a light-duty monochrome laser AIO.
Read the entire review on PCMag



 

Canon Pixma MG2220 Review and Ratings If Canon’s Pixma MG2220 were a summer movie, it would be the low-budget conclusion to a ho-hum trilogy. Of Canon’s summer-2012 photo-printer efforts, all of them entry-level all-in-one (AIO) photo inkjets, this one’s the cheapest. (The other models are the Pixma MG4220 and Pixma MG3220.) At the core, all three of these new Pixmas are direct rehashes of three models we saw in 2011: the Pixma MG4120, MG3120, and MG2120, respectively. Alas, those machines were not overly impressive in their time, and since so little has changed in the 2012 versions, the three newer models didn’t stand out, either.

At $69 list, the Pixma MG2220 is the cheapest of the 2012 trio, and, as you’d expect, it has the fewest features. One of the least-expensive AIOs we’ve seen, it’s also one of the most stripped-down. Indeed, you give up a lot for the $10 difference between it and Canon’s next model up in this line, the MG3220. For example, the Pixma MG3220 supports wireless networking, printing to the machine from mobile devices, and automatic two-sided printing, all features the MG2220 does not.

To get certain other basic features in a Pixma machine (“basic” by today’s standards, anyway, such as a color LCD and printing from flash-memory devices and cloud sites), you’ll have to step up a bit further, to the $149-list Pixma MG4220. Of these three Pixmas, the MG3220, with its better connectivity options and auto-duplexing print engine, is the best value for the budget-strapped. (In our eyes, that model’s biggest trade-off is its inability to print directly from memory cards, something of a no-brainer for a photo printer.)Canon Pixma MG2220 Review

Under what possible circumstances, then, would the Pixma MG2220 make sense? If you have only one computer and no wireless network in your home—and you don’t think you’ll ever need to connect to the printer wirelessly, and you don’t mind flipping pages manually when you need two-sided prints—well, then, saving $10 with the MG2220 over the MG3220 might make sense. But that’s a stretch.

The Pixma MG2220’s lack of Wi-Fi support and convenience features are not our only concerns about the value proposition of this printer. While Canon continues reusing the same print engine in this current family of Pixma MG models, other manufacturers, such as Kodak (with its $99-list ESP 3.2 All-in-One PrinterBest Deal: $69.00 at Walmart.com), have meanwhile souped up their previous models, making them faster and more efficient. In addition, the Pixma MG2220 uses the same print cartridges as the other two Canon MG models discussed here, and they’re pricey on a cost-per-page (CPP) basis. That makes using this printer one of the dearest in the budget-printer field. If you’ll print on it much at all, the initial savings will get eaten up quickly (and soon, forgotten) by what you pay for the ink to keep it going.

Still, $69 isn’t much to pay for a machine that prints, copies, and scans, and if you just want to print the occasional photograph or business document, the MG2220 will give you respectable-looking output, albeit slower than most competitors. It also scans and copies well—but then, too, so do most competing models. Were sluggishness the MG2220’s only shortcoming, we could overlook that for the price. But the high ink cost is a huge drawback, and it makes this AIO hard to recommend for anything more than occasional use.

Read review at Computer Shopper.