My review of the Epson WorkForce Pro ET-8700 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Excellent output quality. Very low running costs after initial investment. Strong mobile connectivity. Ultra-high-yield ink bags. Support for USB memory sticks.

  • CONS

    High price. No SD card support. Recommended monthly page limit is low, considering cost, paper handling, and ink capacity.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    With long-lasting ink bags, Epson’s snappy, high-capacity WorkForce Pro ET-8700 EcoTank All-in-One inkjet can churn thousands of pages at a fraction of the running costs of most competitors.

Save for the earlier WorkForce Pro WF-R4640 EcoTank, it’s difficult to find a proper head-to-head competitor for the WorkForce Pro ET-8700 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer ($999.99). This big inkjet is different from most other Epson EcoTank printers in that it uses large ink bags, rather than reservoirs you refill from bottles. It’s a higher-end, higher-volume all-in-one (AIO) designed for midsize to large offices and workgroups. It’s a snappy-enough printer for an office inkjet, the output quality is quite good, and you can’t beat its ultra-low running costs, making it a top-notch machine within its class. It comes up just short on the oomph, in terms of speed and rated monthly volume, though, needed to nudge it into an Editors’ Choice slot as a midsize business AIO.

Read the entire review at PCMag



  • Review of the Epson Expression ET-3700 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer at PCMagPROS

    Excellent print quality. Very low running costs after initial investment. Light and compact. Supports Wi-Fi Direct mobile connectivity. Drip-proof ink bottles.

  • CONS

    No ADF. No memory device support (USB or SD card).

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson Expression ET-3700 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer prints well at rock-bottom running costs, but it’s overshadowed by more feature-packed competition.

[amazon_link asins=’B074V4MQ3M’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’5c8e347c-ed1c-11e7-a5e0-b1c98375d557′] Epson has been touting its EcoTank technology as a revolutionary new way to buy ink for your printer—in bottles that you empty into reservoirs inside of the machine itself, rather than standard ink cartridges. Like all EcoTank models I’ve seen, the Epson Expression ET-3700 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer ($379.99) [amazon_link asins=’B074V4MQ3M’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’7b43af94-ed1c-11e7-a7f6-0d04fb196d04′] prints good-looking documents and photos at highly reasonable per-page ink costs. However, most of what you pay for this printer covers the eight bottles of ink in the box, and the ET-3700 is still (like its predecessor, the ET-3600) short on speed and capacity—for a near-$400 all-in-one (AIO) printer, anyway. But, if you need to print inexpensive documents and photographs, only another EcoTank (or Canon MegaTank) AIO can print them as inexpensively as the ET-3700.Read the entire article at PCMag



 

  • Review of the Epson Expression Premium ET-7750 EcoTank Wide-Format All-in-One Supertank PrinterPROS

    Excellent output quality, especially photos. Very low running costs. Prints tabloid-size pages. Strong mobile connectivity. Redesigned mess-free ink bottles. Supports both USB and SD card flash memory devices.

  • CONS

    High purchase price. Lacks automatic document feeder. Small, non-touch display. No NFC support. Slow for the price.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson Expression Premium ET-7750 produces exceptional output at very low running costs, making it a terrific value if you use it often enough to justify its purchase price.

[amazon_link asins=’B0753HDQ2J’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’e88bb914-e288-11e7-b656-83c781ce09d8′]Top of the line in Epson’s latest round of seven new EcoTank all-in-one (AIO) printers, the Expression Premium ET-7750 EcoTank Wide-Format All-in-One Supertank Printer ($649.99) [amazon_link asins=’B0753HDQ2J’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’41c7cefe-e289-11e7-a6e7-6de6c6172556′] is unique to all other Epson EcoTank and/or Canon MegaTank bulk-ink AIOs. Granted, many cartridge-less AIOs print good-looking photos, but the ET-7750 is the first (aside from its ET-7700 sibling) consumer-grade five-ink supertank photo printer, making it one of the least-expensive-to-use photo AIOs on the market. That, and its ability to print borderless tabloid-size pages and photos, makes it a great buy for photo enthusiasts…
Read the entire review at PCMag



 

  • Review of the Epson Expression ET-2700 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer at PCMagPROS

    Excellent print quality. Very low running costs after initial investment. Mess-free ink bottles. Supports Wi-Fi Direct mobile connectivity. Light and compact.

  • CONS

    No ADF. Does not support automatic two-sided printing. Can’t print borderless photos or documents larger than 4-by-6-inch snapshots. Ink level windows are inconveniently located. Lacks memory drive support.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson Expression ET-2700 All-in-One Supertank Printer may lack a few features for the price, but it prints well and with low running costs.

[amazon_link asins=’B074V54TWR’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’a58d23ac-dd03-11e7-ad1c-0f31d0278942′]Aside from its ability to hold thousands of pages worth of inexpensive-per-page ink, at its core, the $279.99 Expression ET-2700 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer [amazon_link asins=’B074V54TWR’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’105f7b46-dd04-11e7-baba-7fae020c6dfc’] is a very basic all-in-one (AIO) inkjet printer. The ET-2700 brings a few sorely needed upgrades from its previous version, the Expression ET-2600 [amazon_link asins=’B01N0GJFUH’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’44552d77-dd04-11e7-82d3-5d6b91153b4f’] —including, for instance, the ability to print borderless snapshots. Otherwise, this new model is much like the one that came before it. If you need to print a few hundred pages each month, and don’t require a lot of frills, like, say, a color touch screen and two-sided printing, the ET-2700 churns out terrific-looking pages and photos at some of the lowest running costs you’ll find.

Read entire review at PCMag



 

Review of the Epson DS-780N Network Color Document Scanner at PCMag

  • PROS

    Networkable via Ethernet. Huge color touch screen control panel. 100-sheet ADF. Control panel supports up to 30 configurable users. Wide security options.

  • CONS

    Somewhat costly. No Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi Direct for mobile connectivity.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The networkable scans relatively quickly and accurately, and it has a huge customizable color touch screen, but it’s overshadowed by some less costly competition.

[amazon_textlink asin=’B0733P29Y4′ text=’Epson DS-780N ‘ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’fc9bd450-d063-11e7-b8c9-9bedd3cf227f’] Similar in features to the Editors’ Choice Brother ImageCenter ADS-3600W [amazon_link asins=’B01AD7I6P0′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’35092caa-d064-11e7-8cd2-c3441c74cc66′], the mid-to-high-volume Epson DS-780N Network Color Document Scanner ($1,099.99) [amazon_link asins=’B0733P29Y4′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’668d1479-d067-11e7-b24a-8dd9df1e70bc’] is designed for use in small- to medium-size offices and workgroups that need to do a fair amount of document scanning and archiving. It’s not quite as fast as the Brother model, and it doesn’t support wireless networking. It’s competitively accurate, has an intuitive, highly useful touch screen, and comes with efficient document management software, making it a strong alternative to the ADS-3600W, as well as a few other networkable document scanners we’ve reviewed recently. Its price causes it to fall just short of our Editors’ Choice nod, but otherwise the DS-780N is a fine document scanner.
Read entire review at PCMag


Review of the Epson WorkForce ET-4750 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Excellent output quality. Very low running costs after initial investment. Ships with generous amount of ink. Supports Wi-Fi Direct mobile connectivity. Small and light.

  • CONS

    Slow for the price. High purchase price. Automatic document feeder (ADF) is not auto-duplexing. No NFC support.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson ET-4750 EcoTank AIO printer may be a bit slow, but it prints excellent quality documents and photos at a very low cost per print.

[amazon_link asins=’B074V4QLXF’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’219c3005-cafd-11e7-b85e-15cb68821752′]Depending on how much you use it, the Epson WorkForce ET-4750 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer ($499.99) [amazon_link asins=’B074V4QLXF’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’463ba4bb-cafd-11e7-bdae-2b6c215213aa’] is either a wise investment or a waste of money. Like the WorkForce ET-4550 [amazon_link asins=’B01122JFSM’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’566addac-cafd-11e7-ae4a-ad3172564d21′] before it, or its direct competitor, the Canon Pixma G4200 Wireless MegaTank All-in-One Printer [amazon_link asins=’B01MV1LWKY’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’6fb1cff0-cafd-11e7-9bca-4de7fc227100′], the ET-4750 is a supertank, or bulk ink printer. Supertank all-in-one (AIO) printers are marketed under the pay-more-up-front-to-pay-less-for-ink-later model. Aside from the way you buy and feed it ink, though, the ET-4750 is roughly a pared-down equivalent to the Editors’ Choice Epson WorkForce Pro WF-4720.[amazon_link asins=’B01MT8VSLU’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’84234514-cafd-11e7-89c5-57722cccad79′] It’s slow and short on features for a $500 AIO, but it prints quite well, and the ongoing per-page price of ink is minuscule, making it an excellent choice for home-based or small offices or workgroups that need to print or copy from several hundred to a thousand or so pages each month.
Read the entire review at PCMag


[amazon_link asins=’B01N0GJFUH’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’ff473bab-c70d-11e7-9229-b975763d4b30′]Here we are a year and a half (or so) after Epson first released its consumer- and small-office-grade EcoTank “supertank” printers in the United States, It’s a product introduction that, if you believe what the Japanese electronics giant tells us, has met with huge success.

While we complained for years about inkjet-printer makers selling ink for exorbitant per-page prices (and like to think that we did our bit to spur change), when EcoTank printers came out, we wondered whether U.S. consumers would recognize the benefit of paying more for the printer up front to save on the ongoing cost of ink. EcoTank printers, like the Expression ET-2550 EcoTank All-in-One [amazon_link asins=’B01122JE56′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’2c3723a0-c70e-11e7-814f-03dd45b9a73f’], after all, are priced at four or five times more than their non-“supertanker” counterparts.

If what Epson told us about EcoTank printer sales is accurate (and we have no reason to believe that it’s not), consumers indeed have embraced this new way to buy printers. The release of the $279.99 Expression ET-2600 EcoTank All-in-One [amazon_link asins=’B01N0GJFUH’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’1e882d6d-c70e-11e7-83ca-afb4caf553df’] (today’s review model) and its $20-more-expensive ET-2650 EcoTank [amazon_link asins=’B01NA8VVT3′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’47844697-c70e-11e7-888b-557a4ef89f33′]  sibling marks round two in what we have recently dubbed the “big ink” wars. (Both are upgrades to the Expression ET-2550.) Epson, by expanding the EcoTank product line, has co-signed this pay-more-now-to-pay-less-later approach to selling printers, while Brother, with its INKvestment product line, came onboard a while back. And Canon recently joined the fray with its new MegaTank Pixma G-series machines. It’s clear: This battle of the ink bottle is on.

Epson Expression ET-2600 (Three Quarters View)

Instead of using standard ink cartridges, Epson’s EcoTank printers, like Canon’s MegaTank machines, deploy relatively large reservoirs that you fill with ink from bottles. (Brother’s INKvestment products continue to use cartridges.) In either case, the idea is the same: lower running costs, higher initial purchase prices.

Which brings us back to the Expression ET-2600. As mentioned, Epson offers two Expression ET-2600-series models. The difference between them: The Expression ET-2650 comes with a slot for printing from SD cards, and it supports Wi-Fi Direct (a peer-to-peer protocol that allows you to print from and scan to mobile devices without a network). If you need either of these features, spending the additional $20 for the Expression ET-2650 seems like a no-brainer to us.

Aside from rock-bottom running costs, what the Expression ET-2600 and ET-2650 have going for them is excellent print quality; we’ll discuss that in more detail in the Output Quality section later on. In fact, graphics and photo quality are exceptional, with only one caveat: The Expression ET-2600, like its predecessor, can’t print borderless documents or photos. We’ll look at why that’s important, also, later on.

Epson Expression ET-2600 (Angled)

As we’ve said about other EcoTank (and Canon MegaTank) models, don’t let the price fool you. This is above all else a low-volume, entry-level printer priced to save you money on the ongoing per-page price of ink. And from that perspective, it works. It prints well and costs very little to use, and it provides the ability to scan and copy, also on a low-volume basis. If that’s all you need, the Expression ET-2600 should serve you well.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper



 

Review of the Epson WorkForce ET-16500 EcoTank Wide-Format All-in-One Supertank Printer at PCMagThe Epson WorkForce Pro ET-16500 EcoTank Wide-Format All-in-One Supertank Printer ($999.99) is the first wide-format inkjet printer we’ve looked at in Epson’s EcoTank line, which uses ink tanks or bottles in place of cartridges. As such, it can print pages up to supertabloid size (13 by 19), as well as scan, copy, and fax tabloid (11-by-17) pages. Overall, the ET-16500 is a fine printer, but it performed slowly during some of our benchmark tests, and, at $1,000, it’s expensive to purchase. Its running costs, though, are low enough to take the sting out of the purchase price—as long as you use it frequently, that is.

Read the entire review at PCMag

Review of the Epson Expression ET-3600 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer at PCMagEpson’s EcoTank printers promise very low running costs over time, at the expense of a higher purchase price, and the Epson Expression ET-3600 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer ($399.99) is no exception. In terms of price, capacity, and features, it fits between two of the previous EcoTank inkjets we’ve reviewed, the Epson Expression ET-2550 EcoTank All-in-One Printer and the Epson WorkForce ET-4550 EcoTank All-in-One Printer. These printers makes sense only if you print enough to justify paying a significant additional up-front cost for the initial bottles of ink that come in the box—in this case, what Epson claims is two years’ worth, or enough to print 11,000 black-and-white and/or 8,500 color pages. But if you do print enough, the ET-3600 can be a terrific deal.

Read the entire review at PCMag

Epson WorkForce Pro WF-R4640 (Ink)Inkjet printers are amazing technology—microscopic nozzles spraying tiny droplets of ink in precisely manipulated patterns. That R&D isn’t cheap, though, and a whole other set of elaborate endeavors on the side have sought to maintain the sky-high cost of that ink. It’s printer manufacturers’ main path to profit. In some ways (and much less conspicuously), it’s akin to the pricing shenanigans of the gasoline market.

Recently, though, a few printer makers—HP, Epson, and Brother—have, by reinventing each of their respective ink-distribution models, set out to change the ink dynamic. As we’ve explained in our reviews of a couple of Epson EcoTank models (the Expression ET-2550 EcoTank All-in-One Printer and WorkForce ET-4550 EcoTank All-in-One Printer), EcoTank printers are a new approach to ink delivery in business inkjet printers. With those printers, large EcoTank “supertanker” ink containers come fastened to their right side. Unlike in the cartridge-based inkjet world, with these, you can open the EcoTank containers and replenish a given color of ink from an Epson refill bottle.

Today’s EcoTank all-in-one (AIO) review unit, the $1,199.99-MSRP WorkForce Pro WF-R4640 All-in-One Printer, is a bit different, and a bit bigger. It has compartments for holding huge bags of ink on both sides…

Epson WorkForce Pro WF-R4640 (Angle View)The flagship model of the EcoTank series to date, the WorkForce WF-R4640 is, like the other printers in this series, essentially an existing AIO retrofitted with the EcoTank ink storage and plumbing. In this case, rather than refilling reservoirs from relatively large bottles of ink, here you simply swap out an empty ink bag for a full one. We’ll look closely at this configuration, how well it works, and the economics a little later.

In this case, the WorkForce Pro WF-R4640 is at the core Epson’s $399.99-MSRP WorkForce Pro WF-4640 All-in-One, the two-input-drawer version of one of our Editors’ Choice recipients, theWorkForce Pro WF-4630 All-in-One. (We should point out that at the time of this writing in late April 2016, we found the WorkForce WF-4640 for as low as $270 and the WF-4630 for as low as $200.)

In our analysis, the WorkForce WF-4640 was a good choice for upgrading to an EcoTank model. Keep in mind, though, that what Epson has essentially done is retrofit the WF-4640 to use the EcoTank system and then multiply the price by a factor of three or four, from a $399.99 list price (or $270 typical street price) to $1,199 (which was both the MSRP and street price when we wrote this).

When viewed from the perspective of the past couple paragraphs, the WorkForce WF-R4640 mightsound like an economic enigma—who would pay four times the price for essentially the same printer? Our analysis so far has said nothing about the huge, 20,000-page ink bags that come with the printer—enough ink, according to Epson, to last for two years.

Two years? Really? Well, that all depends on where and how you might be using this printer. One office’s first two years’ worth of ink is another’s first two weeks’ appetizer.

If you printed 20,000 pages over the course of two years (730 days), that comes out to about 27 pages per day. If you back out weekends, holidays, and any number of other reasons you might not print on certain days, let’s be generous and say the ink bags will print 50 pages per day.

The printer can certainly handle that. A 50-page-per-day load, even on every day of a 30-day month, is far, far below the WF-R4640’s 45,000-page monthly duty cycle (Epson’s rating for the most pages the printer ought to handle in a given month). In other words, if you actually pushed it to or close to its monthly rating, you would run out of ink in the first few weeks.

Epson SureColor P800 (Front View)The good news in all this is that when it comes time to buy new ink bags, as you’ll see a bit later in this review, the per-page cost of ink is quite low. Even color pages come in well under what we consider competitive cost-per-page (CPP) figures. But then the CPPs, while certainly impressive, aren’t the only reason to buy this high-volume workhorse. Remember that the WorkForce model from which it has been adapted is a fine office-centric AIO in its own right. It had plenty of reasons—good print speed and print quality, mobile connectivity options, not to mention a strong set of productivity and convenience features—to make it a Computer Shopper Editors’ Choice recipient, too.

It just comes down to the price, and how soon you think you might burn through 20,000 pages of printing. We liked this printer, but we recognize that $1,200 is a lot to pay for an inkjet printer of this caliber, in essence, a printer that at the core has the features of a $300-to-$400 model. If you use your printer—and we mean churn out thousands of prints and copies each month—when it comes time to buy new ink, and every time after that, you will save big. The cost per page is far more economical after you’ve exhausted that first set.

The more and the longer you use the WF-R4640, the better a value it is compared to some other competing models capable of the same print volume. But if it’ll take you years and years to drain the first set of tanks, this is not the right printer for you.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper.