Review of the Canon Pixma TS6120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One at PCMag

  • PROS

    Takes up little space. Five ink cartridges for higher-quality text and photos. Two paper-input trays. Bluetooth 4.0 support. Excellent print quality, especially photos. Prints photos fast.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder, SD card or USB thumb drive support. Lacks NFC and Wi-Fi Direct. Slow document printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Canon Pixma TS6120 prints exceptional text, graphics and photos, but an automatic document feeder, memory drive support, and lower running costs would make it more attractive.

Part of a recent debut of five new TS-series Pixmas, the Canon Pixma TS6120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($149.99) ($99.99  at Amazon) replaces the Pixma TS6020 as a low-volume photo-centric all-in-one (AIO) printer for family and home office use. Aside from the addition of Bluetooth and a few other small tweaks, the TS6120 isn’t much different from its predecessor. It looks and prints the same, and at the same speeds, for the same list price, which is about $50 less than the Editors’ Choice Canon Pixma TS9120. Like most consumer-grade photo printers in this price range, the TS6120 is slow, and it has no automatic document feeder (ADF). It prints quite well, though—especially photos—making it a sensible lower-cost alternative to the pricier and more-expensive-to-use Canon TS9120.
Read the entire review at PCMag

Review of HP Envy Photo 7855 All-in-One at Computer ShopperIt’s been a couple of years since we’ve reviewed one of HP’s Envy-brand all-in-one (AIO) inkjet printers. The last one, the Envy 7640 e-All-in-One (Check on Amazon at Amazon), was a predecessor to (or at least, in the same series as) the model we’re reviewing here today, the $199-list HP Envy Photo 7855 All-in-One.

Why has it been so long? Well, frankly, there just haven’t been new Envy models to review until now, in late summer 2017. Part of a multi-device rollout that includes the $129-MSRP Envy Photo 6200 All-in-One and the $149-list Envy Photo 7100 All-in-One, the Envy Photo 7855  is the flagship model in this new line.

As the highest-numbered AIO of the bunch, the Envy Photo 7855, as you’d expect, costs the most and gets the most robust set of features. It has, for instance, an automatic document feeder (ADF) for sending multipage originals to the scanner, rather than making you place them on the platen one at a time. In fact, the Envy Photo 7855’s feature set, which includes several functions its less-expensive siblings don’t have&mdashmemory device support, fax, Ethernet, an automatic extending output tray, and support for legal-size paper—is somewhat lopsided, especially given the $50 list-price difference between it and the next-step-down Envy Photo 7100.

We’ll take a closer look at the Photo 7855’s features in the next section. As context, first: By positioning these new Envy models as photo printers, HP has put them toe-to-toe with some formidable competition from two of its major competitors, Canon and Epson. The competing families are, namely, Canon’s photo-centric Pixma TS-series and Epson’s Expression Photo models. These include the six-ink Canon Pixma TS9020 Wireless Inkjet All-In-One ($62.99 at Amazon) and the five-ink Epson Expression Photo XP-860 Small-in-One.($199.99 at Amazon)

These, and several others in both Canon’s and Epson’s stables of consumer-grade photo inkjets, churn out superb photos. One of the questions addressed in the Output Quality section near the end of this review is whether HP’s more traditional four-ink (cyan, magenta, yellow, and black) Envy Photo models are capable of the same brilliant and highly detailed photo output as its five- and six-ink competitors are.

From HP’s POV, the company says a reformulated black ink and some other tweaks make these new photo-centric HP AIOs highly capable photograph printers, too. That said, these so-called photo printers don’t use separate cartridges for each ink, with HP instead deploying a two-cartridge system consisting of one filled with black ink and another holding the other three inks. That’s a system most other inkjet makers have gotten away from, primarily because when one of the reservoirs on the three-ink tank empties before the other two, the entire cartridge must be discarded, thereby wasting ink.

HP says that it has successfully addressed this issue with a new technology it calls Active Ink Balancing Technology, or AIB. According to HP, AIB “…tracks how you are printing. If you are printing a lot of magenta, for instance, it would use CY [cyan and yellow inks], then, on non-PQ [Printer Quality] needed projects (like a word document, not a photo) so that your colors in the IPH [cartridge] all run out closer together.”

We have no scientific way to test this, of course. However, in answer to our question, “What if the user prints a lot of images containing high concentrations of blue sky or water, thereby requiring a disproportionate amount of cyan ink (or other like scenarios)?” HP said that AIB technology can’t compensate for extreme situations like this. In other words, it can’t perform miracles.

One thing that most so-called photo printers have in common, including the Envy Photo 7855, is high per-page ink costs. As we’ll discuss later on, though, the Envy Photo 7855 and its siblings are Instant Ink-ready, meaning that they support HP’s Instant Ink subscription service, one of the least-expensive ways that we know of to print photographs. It breaks out like this, but we’ll get into the details later…

HP Envy Photo 7855 (Instant Ink)

And that&mdashthe ability to print good-looking photographs for literally a few pennies each&mdashis without question a good reason for choosing the Envy Photo 7855 over its competitors, especially if you intend to print a lot of images. With the Envy Photo 7855, you might give up some image quality, but what you’d save on ink each month (and over the life of the printer) could save you a pile of money over time.

Read entire review at Computer Shopper



 

About.com Rating    3 1/2 

When you think of photo printers, which printer maker comes to mind? HP? Canon? Epson? Well, while they all make decent photo printers, when I think photo printers, more often than not, I think Canon—a name associated with quality imaging for as long as I can remember (and I’m here to tell you, that’s quite a long time). In fact, I’ve said here (and several other places on the Internet) that few, if any, photo-optimized consumer-grade machines print photos as well as Canon’s 6-ink Pixmas.

Today, though, we’re talking about a 5-ink Pixma, Canon’s $99.99 (MSRP) Pixma MG5620 Wireless Inkjet Photo All-in-One, part of a trio of Photo All-in-Ones (AIOs) the Japanese imaging giant debuted recently. The other two were the $149.99-list, 5-ink Pixma MG6620 and the $199.99-list, 6-ink Pixma MG7520. As the cheapest of the three, the MG5620, as you’d imagine, comes, compared to the other two models, stripped down, lacking what many people may consider important convenience and productivity features.

Read the entire review at About.com