Review of the HP OfficeJet 3830 All-in-One Printer at PCMag

    • PROS

      Very low price. Light and compact. Impressive print quality. Low running costs with Instant Ink. Good-looking photos on HP photo paper. 35-sheet automatic document feeder (ADF). Touch screen is an unexpected amenity.

    • CONS

      Running costs are exorbitant without Instant Ink. No auto-duplexing. Two-cartridge ink setup is potentially wasteful. Lacks flash memory support and Ethernet.

BOTTOM LINE

  • The low-price, entry-level HP OfficeJet 3830 prints well and at reasonable running costs—when you sign up for HP’s Instant Ink subscription program—but you give up some features and functionality for the savings.

The HP OfficeJet 3830 All-In-One Printer ($79.99), an entry-level inkjet all-in-one (AIO), is a capable machine, but like many AIOs in this class, including the more-expensive Canon Pixma TR8520 Wireless Home Office All-In-One Printer, our Editors’ Choice, it has many formidable competitors. Unlike the Canon TR8520, the OfficeJet 3830 does not support two-sided printing, Ethernet networking, flash memory devices, and a few other noteworthy features. What the OfficeJet 3830 does have going for it is that, not only does it cost less than the Canon model, it also costs less to use—as long as you opt for HP’s Instant Ink subscription program, that is. The OfficeJet 3830 prints well, and it’s a good alternative to the Canon TR8520 for low-volume printing and copying in a small or home-based office or student dormitory.

Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Canon imageClass MF236n at PCMag

  • PROS

    Good price. Fits comfortably on an average desktop. Automatic document feeder (ADF). Reasonably fast. Excellent print quality.

  • CONS

    No auto-duplex printing or scanning. Running costs are high. Lacks Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi Direct, and NFC.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Canon’s entry-level imageClass MF236n prints good-looking monochrome documents at a respectable clip, but its running costs relegate it to a low-volume laser AIO.

Like the Editors’ Choice imageClass MF249dw, the Canon imageClass MF236n ($199) is an entry-level monochrome laser all-in-one (AIO) printer designed for low-volume printing, copying, scanning, and faxing in a small or micro home-based office or workgroup. You sacrifice a few things for the low price, however, such as the ability to copy and scan two-sided multipage documents automatically, as well as wireless networking. While the MF236n is a capable little AIO, what you give up for a not-so-significant price difference between it and the Canon MF249dw is more than enough to keep the MF236n as a mere contender; however, in the right low-to-medium-print-volume environments, it’s a sensible alternative to its costlier sibling.
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Canon imageClass MF232w at PCMag

  • PROS

    Good price. Compact. Excellent print quality. Fast print speed.

  • CONS

    Running costs could be better. Lacks automatic document feeder (ADF). No auto-duplex printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    It may lack an ADF and automatic two-sided printing, but Canon’s imageClass MF232w all-in-one (AIO) prints well and at a highly respectable speed for the price.

The Canon imageClass MF232w ($189) is a monochrome all-in-one (AIO) laser printer that’s a step below the Editors’ Choice Canon imageClass MF249dw. Granted, it lacks an automatic document feeder (ADF) and an auto-duplexing print engine for printing two-sided pages automatically. What you do get with this sub-$200 laser AIO, however, is decent print speeds and good output quality for the price, as well as competitive running costs. That makes it a sensible choice for low-volume printing and copying from a home-based or small or micro office or workgroup, or as a low-volume personal laser AIO.
Read entire review at PCMag


Review of the Epson WorkForce WF-7710 Wide-Format All-in-One Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Prints up to 13-by-19-inch pages. Scans, copies, and faxes multipage, two-sided originals up to 11 by 17 inches. Auto-duplexing ADF and scanner. Large, easy-to-use control panel. Good overall print quality.

  • CONS

    High cost per page. Graphics printing could be better. Only one paper cassette.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson WorkForce WF-7710 prints, copies, and scans wide-format pages with ease, but it doesn’t quite stand up to its formidable competition.

The Epson WorkForce WF-7710 Wide-Format All-in-One Printer ($249.99) is a super-tabloid all-in-one (AIO) capable of borderless prints up to 13 by 19 inches. It also scans, copies, and faxes up to tabloid size (11 by 17 inches).However, the WF-7710 costs significantly more to use than our Editors’ Choice Brother MFC-J6935DW, and its paper capacity is less than half. It’s worth considering the WF-7710 if you need to print super-tabloid size pages (the Brother model can only handle up to tabloid size), but otherwise, the Epson is a perfectly good printer that faces some very stiff competition.
Read the entire review at PCMag


Brother DCP-L2550DW Review and Ratings at Computer ShopperA laser printer by any other name…

When is a monochrome laser multifunction or all-in-one (AIO) printer not a laser all-in-one printer? Well, when, according to Brother, it’s a multifunction copier. And what’s a multifunction copier? Is it a new product genre, perhaps? For the longest time now, all-in-ones that lack a specific function, such as fax functionality or an automatic document feeder (ADF), have nevertheless been called AIOs—until Brother’s recent round of monochrome laser products, that is.

The company’s latest monochrome laser printer/copier/scanner (sans fax), the $159.99-list DCP-L2550DW seen here, and its DCP-L2540DW sibling have been dubbed multifunction copiers, which does little more than muddy the product-naming waters this late in the game. But hey, we’re too concerned with more important things, such as price, performance, print quality, running costs, and overall value, to worry about nomenclature. What type of users does the product serve and how well does it serve them, right?

To answer that question generally, the Brother DCP-L2550DW is an entry-level monochrome laser printer designed for use in a home-based or small office or workgroup. It’s fast for its price, and it prints well enough, as long as your application doesn’t call for a lot of nice-looking grayscale graphics and photos; in other words, it’s best suited for printing text. That isn’t a restriction for all monochrome laser printers; some of Canon’s monochrome AIOs, even entry-level models like the Canon imageClass MF249dw, produce impressive grayscale output. (Although if good-looking photos are what you’re after, you should be reading an inkjet printer review.)

In any case, the DCP-L2550DW is a great text printer, and we can think of plenty of settings where a reasonably fast low-volume text printer fits well, especially environments where quick delivery of one- and two-page documents is just the ticket.

That includes just about every front office or front desk setting—doctors’ offices, pharmacies, auto repair shops, tire shops—and anywhere else that needs to print quotes, receipts, and so on. Not only will they benefit from the fast, good-looking text documents, but few of these offices print more than 100 to 200 pages each month, which sort of minimizes the DCP-L2550DW’s steep running costs. The latter are our biggest complaint about this printer (and the entry-level laser market in general).

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper



 

Review of the Epson WorkForce WF-7720 Wide-Format All-in-One Printer at PCMag

    • PROS

      Prints up to 13-by-19-inch pages. Scans and copies multipage, two-sided originals up to 11 by 17 inches. Auto-duplexing ADF and scanner. Diverse connectivity. Great-looking, easy-to-use control panel.

CONS

    • High cost per page. Graphics printing could be better.

BOTTOM LINE

  • The Epson WorkForce WF-7720 prints, copies, and scans wide-format pages and is backed by a robust feature set, but its comparatively high cost per page relegates it to being a low-volume business printer.

The Epson WorkForce WF-7720 Wide-Format All-in-One Printer ($299.99) prints oversize pages up to super-tabloid size (13 by 19 inches), and it scans, copies, and faxes documents up to tabloid size (11 by 17 inches). Like its close competitor, the Editors’ Choice Brother MFC-J6935DW, it prints well and relatively fast, and it’s loaded with top-drawer productivity and convenience features, such as a single-pass auto-duplexing automatic document feeder (ADF). The Brother’s lower running costs and better business graphics keep this model from usurping the Editors’ Choice, but the WF-7720 has plenty of features that make it a suitable low-volume wide-format AIO for small offices and workgroups.
Read the entire review at PCMag


  • PROSA review of the HP Envy Photo 6255 All-in-One Printer from PCMag

    Reasonable price. Attractive design. Low running costs with Instant Ink. Good overall print quality.

  • CONS

    Cost per page exceptionally high without Instant Ink. Banding in dark gradients and backgrounds. Wasteful two-cartridge ink system holds all four inks.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Envy Photo 6255 is a small, lightweight, and attractive consumer-grade AIO that prints good-looking photos and does so at highly competitive running costs, though only when you sign up for HP’s Instant Ink.

[amazon_link asins=’B074P569PP’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’53621d72-09cb-11e8-ab65-b7a3c8b48775′]The lower-end model in a trio of entry-level consumer-grade all-in-one (AIO)inkjet photo printers that HP released recently, the Envy Photo 6255 All-in-One Printer ($129.99) [amazon_link asins=’B074P569PP’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’79ed35da-09cb-11e8-8137-37873a0c94f6′] competes directly with the Editors’ Choice Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless Inkjet Printer,[amazon_link asins=’B074VFYB9J’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’9a7d3d92-09cb-11e8-be2c-87f015ab7942′] as well as a few others in the Pixma TS-series line. The Envy 6255 is a bit slower, shorter on features, and its photo print quality falls a little behind that of the Canon TS9120; on the other hand, when you pair it with HP’s Instant Ink subscription service, you get some of the lowest per-page running costs from a consumer-grade photo printer available, making the Envy 6255 an excellent alternative for homes and families who want to print a few hundred photos inexpensively.
Read the entire review at PCMags



 

  • PROSReview of the Brother MFC-L2750DW XL at PCMag

    Near-typesetter text quality. Small and light. Single-pass auto-duplexing. Huge selection of connectivity options and workflow apps. Ships with large complement of toner.

  • CONS

    So-so graphics and image quality. High running costs after initial toner is used. Small paper capacity and duty cycle for price.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Brother MFC-L2750DW XL is a well-connected monochrome laser AIO printer that produces excellent text output, but its price is high thanks to the large amount of included toner.

[amazon_link asins=’B07641MHV2′ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’185b2d63-087e-11e8-bae3-4784042760e2′]The Brother MFC-L2750DW XL ($399.99) [amazon_link asins=’B07641MHV2′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’c1300a82-087f-11e8-bd85-f97f95246a1b’] is one of the company’s first “XL” laser printers, which, to put it simply, means that the printer comes with a bunch of extra toner in the box. This results in a loftier price than we are used to seeing in an entry-level-to-midrange monochrome laser all-in-one (AIO), but it’s reasonably fast and prints well, making it a decent pick for home-based or small offices and workgroups with light print and copy loads, or perhaps even a personal monochrome laser AIO.The downside here is that, unlike Brother’s INKvestment inkjet counterparts—which not only come with extra ink but also incur very low ongoing running costs—the XL line simply provides the convenience of additional toner at the time of purchase. In other words, you won’t be ordering toner as soon, but when you do, you’ll pay essentially the same somewhat high per-page cost for it as you would to buy toner for several other Brother entry-level machines. Essentially, then, all you get for the additional expense (without the extra toner, the MFC-L2750DW XL would most likely sell for $200 to $300) is somewhat cheaper toner for the first several thousand pages, and, depending on usage, a long gap between when you buy the printer and when you must spring for more toner—a convenience to be sure, but perhaps not much of one.Read the entire review at PCMag                               


 


  • PROSReview of the Brother MFC-L2710DW at PCMag

    Exceptional text quality. Prints fast. Compact and lightweight. Ethernet support. Relatively low purchase price.

  • CONS

    Lacks support for USB thumb drives and memory cards. ADF not auto-duplexing. So-so business graphics and photos.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Brother MFC-L2710DW, a reasonably fast, low price, entry-level monochrome all-in-one laser printer, is an apt fit for low-volume print and copy environments.

The Brother [amazon_textlink asin=’B0763ZCH7K’ text=’MFC-L2710DW’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’a62b4ef6-084d-11e8-91e3-cdf636de9f00′] ($199.99) is an entry-level all-in-one (print, copy, scan, and fax) printer designed for small and/or home-based offices or workgroups with modest printing needs, or perhaps as a personal monochrome laser AIO. For an entry-level AIO, it has a relatively strong feature set, and it’s fast. On the other hand, its running costs are a bit too high, and print quality (especially graphics and photos) leaves a little something to be desired. Even so, it’s space-saver small, well-built, and prints well enough overall, making it a suitable choice for low-volume monochrome print and copy environments.

Read the entire review at PCMag



 

Review of Epson WorkForce ET-3700 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank PrinterOf the four major inkjet printer makers—Brother, Canon, Epson, and HP—Epson, with its EcoTank onboard supertank containers you fill from bottles, has made by far the largest commitment to delivering its consumables in unconventional, presumably less expensive ways. With the Japanese imaging giant’s latest round of seven new EcoTank all-in-one (AIO) inkjets, including today’s review unit, the $399.99 WorkForce ET-3750 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer, it now has more than three times as many bulk-ink AIOs than Canon’s similar (in concept, anyway) MegaTank machines.

[amazon_link asins=’B074V52CL4′ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’ad24b60a-0319-11e8-8729-31eacc6d576f’]While Brother’s and HP’s cartridge-based bulk-ink solutions (INKvestment and Instant Ink, respectively) are much easier for the manufacturers themselves to deploy, Epson now offers at least as many discounted-ink printers as its competitors. This latest round of EcoTank models (some we’ve reviewed already, and some are in the wings) consists of three Expression models (ET-2700, [amazon_link asins=’B074V54TWR’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’cd281545-0316-11e8-b4f2-f52f60205d62′] ET-2750, [amazon_link asins=’B074V4TTY2′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’ee0f642d-0316-11e8-8da4-5936e7d05ad8′] and ET-3700); [amazon_link asins=’B074V4MQ3M’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’fe1457e8-0316-11e8-bd85-f97f95246a1b’] two WorkForce models (WorkForce ET-3750 [amazon_link asins=’B074V52CL4′ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’0d0f080f-0317-11e8-a946-e77a1a346015′]and WorkForce ET-4750); [amazon_link asins=’B074V4QLXF’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’1f4e0cf3-0317-11e8-be3a-612339bf5f77′] and two five-ink, photo-centric Expression Premium models (Expression Premium ET-7700 [amazon_link asins=’B074V4N9JM’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’ab2c5e58-0318-11e8-b140-a304cb42e8a7′] and Expression Premium ET-7750 [amazon_link asins=’B0753HDQ2J’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’b9b538c5-0318-11e8-a3df-bf381fd2ee40′]).

That last one, the ET-7750, supports wide-format (tabloid-size, or 11×17-inch) pages, which significantly increases the types of documents you can design and print, such as borderless photos up to 11 by 17 inches, spreadsheets up to twice the standard letter size, small booklets, or perhaps borderless brochures up to letter size and beyond. You can print similar documents with the ET-3750, too, except that it stops at legal-size (8.5 by 14 inches) pages.

Epson WorkForce ET-3750 (Left Angled)

Otherwise, as a WorkForce (business-oriented) AIO, you get a few features unavailable on the Epson Expression models, such as a 35-sheet automatic document feeder (ADF) for sending multipage documents to the scanner, as well as Epson’s PrecisionCore printhead technology, which prints faster, better-looking text and graphics. We’ll look a little closer at both features in the Design & Features section, next.

Of course, the ET-3750 and its siblings distinguish themselves with EcoTank reservoirs, supertank plumbing, and bottles full of ink, which, as you’ll see in the Cost Per Page section later on, greatly affect the economics for purchasing and using this type of printer. Depending on what and how much you print, the ET-3750 and its ilk can be a terrific value. If, on the other hand, you (like many entry-level printer buyers) set it up in a corner and let it, aside from the occasional print or copy job, collect dust, the ET-3750 isn’t practical at all.

In the right setting, though—printing hundreds of pages month in and month out—the ET-3750 will deliver great-looking prints at very reasonable running costs, making it a sensible choice for small or home-based offices, micro workgroups, and even as a personal color inkjet AIO—as long as you use it enough to justify the additional up-front expense for the extra ink in the box.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper