Brother ADS-3000N

Brother ADS-3000N, a 100ipm document scanner. Photo courtesy of Brother International

Read the entire Brother’s ImageCenter ADS-3000N Document Scanner review at About.com

Canon Pixma iP7220 Wireless Photo Printer

Canon Pixma iP7220 Wireless Photo Printer. Photograph courtesy of Canon

Read the entire review at About.com

Canon Pixma MG3620 All-in-One Printer review at About.com
Click here for Canon Pixma MG3620 All-in-One Printer review at About.com
Have inkjet printer companies finally heard the outcry?

Have inkjet printer companies finally heard the outcry?

Read the entire article on using third-party ink cartridges and refill products at About.com

HP Envy 4520 All-in-One Printer Review and RatingsIn HP’s 2015 lineup of Envy all-in-one printers (in this case, they are print-, copy-, and scan-capable models), you’ve got some very cheap printers—no other way of saying it.

Only one other Envy model, the Envy 4500 e-All-in-One Printer, is shorter on features and less expensive than the unit we’re reviewing here today: the $99.99-list Envy 4520 All-in-One Printer. In fact, as we wrote this in late October 2015, HP was selling the Envy 4500 for a mere $49.99—mind-bogglingly low for a full-blown multifunction printer. The Envy 4520, on the other hand (most likely because it’s so new), sold everywhere we checked for its full $99.99 MSRP. Still, that’s very inexpensive for a photo and document printer that can do all it does.

HP Envy 4520 (Top View)Like the HP Envy 5540 we reviewed a week or so before this model, the HP Envy 4520 was part of a new six-printer lineup HP released midyear. Ranging in list price from $79 to $299, the six new models comprise two Envy personal or family all-in-ones (AIOs) and four home- or small-office OfficeJet AIOs. (As we noted in our review of the Envy 5540, over the course of the next month or two we’ll look at most or all of them.) They all have one thing in common, though: support for a program HP calls “Instant Ink,” in which you pay a flat subscription fee to print a certain number of pages per month. To make that possible, HP sends you the necessary ink cartridges in the mail as you run low, automatically.

Instant Ink-compatible printers like these six new ones come ready to take part in the program right out of the box. Even so, most of HP’s recent, Internet-connectible consumer- and business-grade printers support or are eligible for, Instant Ink. (That includes some high-volume models, such as the popular OfficeJet Pro 8630 e-All-in-One Printer we looked at back in early 2014.)

The real-world distinction here is that signing up for Instant Ink is much easier with the printers that come Instant Ink-ready, as opposed to those that require you to register the machine with the service on your own. In fact, we found registering an Instant Ink-supported OfficeJet Pro 8620 a much more involved process that eventually led to a short session with HP’s Instant Ink support team. The good news is that the technician was knowledgeable and knew exactly how to help us.

HP Envy 4520 (Angle View)Like its similarly priced sibling, the Envy 5540, the Envy 4520 is small, prints somewhat sluggishly versus competitors, and lacks an automatic document feeder (ADF) for copying and scanning multipage documents. (You have to flip them over manually to copy or scan the other side.)

In other words, this isn’t a workhorse AIO by a long shot, and it’s missing some important convenience and productivity features you might expect on a slightly more expensive AIO. At the same time, unless you need multipage scanning and high-speed volume printing and copying on a semi-regular basis, the Envy 4520 isn’t a bad little entry-level printer.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper


 

Every now and then, a manufacturer takes a fancy to calling this or that product “Smart.” We have smart TVs, smart phones, and smart cars; and now Dell gives us a smart mono laser-class printer, the $229.99 MSRP S2810dn Smart Mono Printer—the topic of today’s review.

The first question is, of course, what makes the S2810dn smart—compared to other single-function laser-class machines, that is? (First question or not, the answer is not so ground-shaking as to warrant disruption of the natural flow of this review.) Suffice it to say here that “smart” simply refers to an overall business-centric printer design consisting of several complimentary features, not some ground-breaking approach to entry-level laser design.

Read the entire review at About.com


After working with a group of professionals recently who swore that laser-class output is superior to that of an inkjet printer, I’m reminded how uninformed much of the printer-buying public is about the current state of printer technology. The truth is that when it comes to overall vibrancy, brightness, and detail, most laser-class machines can’t come close to a good inkjet printer’s output.

Yet another myth that needs busting every now and then is that laser-class machines are faster and cheaper to use than inkjet models.

At one time that was true, but it hasn’t been so for some time—especially when it comes to entry-level and midrange laser-class machines. There are laser-class machines out there, however, such as the topic of this review, OKI Data’s $749 MSRP MC562w Color MFP, that do often match and sometimes out-perform high-volume inkjet models. For those times when, for one reason or another, the output must be laser-class, the MC562w will get the job done.

Read entire review at About.com


 

Epson recently announced a new line of printers (new to North America, anyway) known as EcoTank. In most ways, these all-in-one (AIO) printers are much like their Epson Expression and WorkForce counterparts. For example, the topic of this review, the $499.99 MSRP WorkForce ET-4550 EcoTank All-in-One Printer, is essentially the entry-level $129.99 MSRP WorkForce WF-2650, which strongly resembles the WF-2660 reviewed here a few months ago, with the EcoTank ink tanks attached to the right side.

The ET-4550 is one of five initial EcoTank offerings announced today. (For a description of the five models and a more detailed discussion of EcoTank in general,check out this About.com article.)

Read entire review at About.com


Not every small or medium-size office requires laser output, but many do. If you’re looking a good color laser printer, Canon makes several, including the print engines for many HP laser printers. And, like most Canon imaging devices, the topic of this review, Canon’s $499 MSRP Color ImageCLASS LBP7660Cdn Laser Printer (now there’s a mouth-full) is no exception. It’s a top-notch entry-level/midrange single-function color laser printer with average print speeds and above average output.

Before going on, though, keep in mind that the LBP7660Cdn has been on the market for a few years now; hence I found it at a few outlets for well below $350. As with most laser printers in this class, my main objection is its high cost per page, especially compared similarly priced (and often cheaper) inkjet models that print what are often better-looking pages for a lot lower ongoing operational cost. But then they’re not lasers…

Read the entire review at About.com


 

I have to admit that prior to this gig; I honestly didn’t know that there were so many document scanners in the world—proof, of sorts, that the human race is still printing at an impressive rate. All of the major scanner manufacturers—Canon, Brother, Epson, and HP make several document scanners, ranging in different volumes and prices from a few hundred dollars to upwards of a thousand and beyond.

The good news is that most of them do a decent job, and most come with impressive bundles of optical character recognition (OCR) and document management software. Many Canon models, such as theimageFORMULA DR-M160II Office Document Scanner reviewed here last week, come with the company’s CaptureOnTouch software, as well as several third-party titles from Kofax and document management software from Nuance. Here, though, we are looking at a slightly lower-end machine, Canon’s $799 MSRP imageFORMULA DR-C240 Office Document Scanner.

The DR-C240 is a little slower DR-M160II mentioned above, and it lacks a document management program, per se (though it does come with PDF Pro Office for creating searchable PDFs), even so, it’ll get all butthe most demanding scan jobs done.

Read the entire review at About.com