Featured : William Harrel – Journalist

Featured

Brother’s 4.5-Rated MFC-J6945DW INKvestment Tank Color Inkjet All-In-One Printer

Brother’s 4.5-Rated MFC-J6945DW INKvestment Tank Color Inkjet All-In-One Printer

PROS Low running costs. Good print quality. Prints, scans, copies, and faxes tabloid-size pages. Single-pass duplexing ADF. Three paper input sources. CONS Super-tabloid support would provide greater value. BOTTOM LINE The Brother MFC-J6945DW is a wide-format color inkjet all-in-one printer that prints well and is feature-packed and inexpensive to use, making it an exceptional value for small offices. The Brother MFC-J6945DW ($349.99) is a light- to medium-duty wide-format all-in-one inkjet printer designed for small-office use. Like its predecessor, the Editors’ Choice Brother MFC-J6935DW, it can not only print, but also copy, scan, and fax tabloid-size pages and comes with a generous paper-input capacity. The cherry on top is that it prints quite well and at a very reasonable cost per page. All of these perks add up to an easy Editors’ Choice for the MFC-J6945DW. Read the entire review at PCMag    Read More →

Brother’s Feature-Rich Entry-Level MFC-L3710CW Color Laser-Class All-in-One Printer

Brother’s Feature-Rich Entry-Level MFC-L3710CW Color Laser-Class All-in-One Printer

PROS Good text and photo quality. Large ADF. Decent mobile device support. CONS High running costs. Lacks auto-duplex printing and scanning. No Ethernet. BOTTOM LINE The Brother MFC-L3710CW is a solid color laser-class all-in-one printer for budget-conscious small offices. The Brother MFC-L3710CW ($349.99) is an entry-level all-in-one color laser-class printer designed for small offices and workgroups. It costs $50 less than the Editors’ Choice Brother MFC-L3770CDW, but that price difference means sacrificing a few key features, including automatic two-sided printing, copying, scanning, and faxing, along with Ethernet support and the ability to print from and scan to thumb drives. Both machines, however, share the same high running costs—a common drawback to entry-level laser-class machines like these. The MFC-L3710CW offers some strong perks, including good text and photo quality and a sizable automatic document feeder, but you’ll likely find the MFC-L3770CDW a better value if your budget can stretch a bit. Read the entire review at PCMag    Read More →

Microsoft Launcher Brings Windows Integration and a Lot More to Android

Microsoft Launcher Brings Windows Integration and a Lot More to Android

Android smartphones are capable of many things that you just can’t do on Apple’s iOS (iPhone) devices. One of the slicker Android-only features is the ability to change how your device looks, feels, and behaves—a complete makeover—by simply installing a third-party launcher. One of the more popular launchers is Microsoft Launcher (an upgrade of the Microsoft Garage project Arrow Launcher). Designed primarily to help your Android integrate into the Microsoft ecosystem, Microsoft Launcher will not make your device look and behave like Windows 10. Instead, in addition to providing a highly customizable user interface (UI), it helps ease your Android smartphone’s assimilation in to your Microsoft workflow of apps and services, as well as your Windows laptop or desktop PC. Read the entire review at OnlineTechTips.com January 7, 2019 by William Harrel. File in: Smartphones Currently a contributing editor at PCMag, William Harrel has been writing about computer technology for more than 30 years, since well before the advent of the internet and has authored or coauthored more than 20 books.  Read More →

Brother’s Bare Bones HL-L3210CW Entry-Level Low-Volume Monochrome Laser Printer

Brother’s Bare Bones HL-L3210CW Entry-Level Low-Volume Monochrome Laser Printer

PROS Good text and photo quality. Wi-Fi Direct mobile device support. Respectable paper capacity. CONS No Ethernet connectivity or auto-duplexing. Lacks support for Web Connect printer apps. Graphics print quality below average. BOTTOM LINE Brother’s HL-L3210CW is a capable, if basic, color laser-class LED printer for small offices where tight budgets require some corner-cutting. The Brother HL-L3210CW ($199.99) is a step down from its sibling, the Editors’ Choice HL-L3270CDW. Designed for small offices, both single-function color laser-class printers have the same paper capacity, volume ratings, running costs, and several other like features. What you give up for the $50 price difference, though, is significant, including an easy-to-use touch-screen control panel, plentiful connectivity options, and high-quality graphics output. In other words, it’s worth weighing feature set versus price when considering the HL-L3210CW over its more expensive sibling. Read the entire article at PCMag    Read More →

Top Drawer Color Laser Output from Lexmark’s C2325dw

Top Drawer Color Laser Output from Lexmark’s C2325dw

PROS Fast. Good print quality. High monthly volume ratings. Easy to use. Supports several operating systems and platforms. CONS Expensive to use. Lacks Wi-Fi Direct and NFC. Rudimentary control panel. BOTTOM LINE The Lexmark C2325dw single-function color laser printer is fast, prints well, and supports several operating systems and platforms, but high running costs make it best for low-volume offices. The Lexmark C2325dw ($269) is a budget single-function color laser printer for light-duty use in small-to-medium-size offices. Like the Editors’ Choice Brother HL-L3270CDW, it prints well and at a respectable clip, and it takes up very little desk space. Unfortunately, the price of its consumables is higher than that Brother model, even in a category where bloated long-term costs are par for the course. Otherwise, the C2325dw is a fine low-volume color laser option. Read the entire review at PCMag    Read More →

Run 10 Scanners at Once, Up to 2,000 Images Per Minute with Xerox’s DocuMate 6710

Run 10 Scanners at Once, Up to 2,000 Images Per Minute with Xerox’s DocuMate 6710

PROS Exceptional accuracy. Extremely fast. Feature-rich, easy-to-deploy software. High daily duty cycle. Parallel scanning feature deploys multiple machines on the same PC. CONS Expensive. Connectivity limited to USB 3.0. BOTTOM LINE The Xerox DocuMate 6710 is a super-speedy, highly accurate high-end scanner designed for enterprises that require the fastest throughput possible. Like most other ultra-high-end sheet-feed document scanners, the Xerox DocuMate 6710 ($6,500) is super-fast and extremely accurate. What sets this model apart, though, is Xerox’s new “parallel scanning” feature, which offers the ability to connect up to 10 scanners to the same PC simultaneously, escalating workstation throughput by as much as tenfold. What that means in the real world is increasing a scanning station’s payload from 200 images per minute to 2,000. At $6,500 a pop, that’s an expensive proposition, but for enterprise-grade scenarios that require high-volume and high-speed scanning, it’s pretty impressive. Read the entire review at PCMag    Read More →

Accurate Document Scanning and Archiving Made Easy with Fujitsu’s ScanSnap iX1500

Accurate Document Scanning and Archiving Made Easy with Fujitsu’s ScanSnap iX1500

PROS Accurate OCR. Strong software bundle with financial data support. Versatile connectivity options, including mobile. Easy to use. CONS Lacks Ethernet support. BOTTOM LINE The Fujitsu ScanSnap iX1500 is a well-built, accurate, and easy-to-use entry-level sheet-fed document scanner for home and small-office use. The Fujitsu ScanSnap iX1500 ($495) is a friendly little entry-level scanner for home or small-office use. Like its predecessor, the ScanSnap ix500, it’s fast, highly accurate, and comes with a comprehensive bundle of easy-to-configure-and-use software. While it doesn’t quite top the feature set or attractive price of the Editors’ Choice Brother ADS-2700W, it’s still an excellent pick for light-duty service. Read the entire review at PCMag    Read More →

Keeper Photos with Canon’s Pixma TS8220 Wireless Inkjet All-In-One Printer Update

Keeper Photos with Canon’s Pixma TS8220 Wireless Inkjet All-In-One Printer Update

PROS Excellent print quality. Smart home hands-free printing. Built-in arts and crafts features. Uses six inks. Two paper input trays. SD card support. CONS Lacks NFC or Wi-Fi Direct support. Somewhat slow document printing. Lacks automatic document feeder. High cost per page. BOTTOM LINE The Canon Pixma TS8220 combines the company’s superb six-ink photo and graphics output with new hands-free printing and several arts and crafts features, making it a great-value all-in-one-printer for low-volume offices. The Canon Pixma TS8220 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($199.99) is, except for the addition of a handful of interesting arts and crafts and hands-free-printing features, essentially the same AIO as its predecessor, the Pixma TS8120. Like all the six-ink Pixmas we’ve tested over the years, the TS8220 prints exceptionally well, but, also like the rest of its kin, it costs a lot to use. In addition to above-par output, the TS8220’s support for popular scrapbooking and other crafting projects, as well as its new smart home features, make it a great-value home-and-family-oriented consumer-grade AIO printer for low-volume use. Read the entire review at PCMag    Read More →

Epson’s Low Price & Running Costs WorkForce Pro WF-C5790 Network Multifunction Color Printer

Epson’s Low Price & Running Costs WorkForce Pro WF-C5790 Network Multifunction Color Printer

PROS Competitive purchase price and running costs. Excellent print quality. Expandable paper capacity. Single-pass auto-duplexing ADF. Supports high-yield ink bags. CONS Lacks support for borderless output. Initial paper input capacity a bit low. BOTTOM LINE The Epson WorkForce Pro WF-C5790 is an inkjet all-in-one printer that’s packed with features, prints well, and balances purchase price and running costs fairly, making it a strong color laser AIO competitor. Few inkjets have been better positioned to encroach on the color laser all-in-one market than the Epson WorkForce Pro WF-C5790 ($299.99). It’s relatively fast and churns out near-typesetter print quality across the board. It’s loaded with productivity, convenience, and mobile connectivity features that small- and medium-size offices will appreciate, and its high-volume replaceable ink packs deliver running costs about half that of comparable laser-based machines. The Epson WF-C5790 all but obliterates the line between color laser and inkjet machines, thereby easily elevating it to our Editors’ Choice among mid-volume color AIOs. Read the entire article at PCMag    Read More →

Imaging on the Go with Canon’s CanoScan LiDE 400 Portable Flatbed Scanner

Imaging on the Go with Canon’s CanoScan LiDE 400 Portable Flatbed Scanner

PROS Vibrant photo scans. Excellent software bundle. Comes with kickstand for upright positioning. Very simple to use. CONS Lacks mobile device and wireless support. Could be more accurate when scanning serif fonts. BOTTOM LINE The entry-level Canon CanoScan LiDE 400 is a software-rich flatbed photo scanner that also handles text documents with ease. Aside from an interface redesign and a significant software upgrade, the Canon CanoScan LiDE 400 ($89.99) looks and performs a lot like its predecessor, the Editors’ Choice CanoScan LiDE 220. In addition to doing a terrific job of scanning photos, though, the LiDE 400 focuses a lot more on text document scanning and processing than the previous model, making it much more adept at converting scanned text to editable text. This time around, the standout feature is the supporting software, which has made significant strides in speed and accuracy since 2015. Without question, the LiDE 400 usurps the 220’s Editors’ Choice. Read the entire review at PCMag    Read More →

Read More Posts From This Category »