Read the entire review at About.comCanon’s Pixma MG5720 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One Printer

Share

Accurate scans and character recognition. Read the entire review at About.comEpson WorkForce DS-760 Color Document Scanner

Share
 Dell’s S2810dn Smart Mono PrinterEvery now and then, a manufacturer takes a fancy to calling this or that product “Smart.” We have smart TVs, smart phones, and smart cars; and now Dell gives us a smart mono laser-class printer, the $229.99 MSRP S2810dn Smart Mono Printer—the topic of today’s review.

The first question is, of course, what makes the S2810dn smart—compared to other single-function laser-class machines, that is? (First question or not, the answer is not so ground-shaking as to warrant disruption of the natural flow of this review.) Suffice it to say here that “smart” simply refers to an overall business-centric printer design consisting of several complimentary features, not some ground-breaking approach to entry-level laser design.

Read the entire review at About.com

Share

OKI Data MC562w Color MFPAfter working with a group of professionals recently who swore that laser-class output is superior to that of an inkjet printer, I’m reminded how uninformed much of the printer-buying public is about the current state of printer technology. The truth is that when it comes to overall vibrancy, brightness, and detail, most laser-class machines can’t come close to a good inkjet printer’s output.

Yet another myth that needs busting every now and then is that laser-class machines are faster and cheaper to use than inkjet models.

At one time that was true, but it hasn’t been so for some time—especially when it comes to entry-level and midrange laser-class machines. There are laser-class machines out there, however, such as the topic of this review, OKI Data’s $749 MSRP MC562w Color MFP, that do often match and sometimes out-perform high-volume inkjet models. For those times when, for one reason or another, the output must be laser-class, the MC562w will get the job done.

Read entire review at About.com

Share

Epson’s WorkForce ET-4550 EcoTank All-in-One Printer

Epson recently announced a new line of printers (new to North America, anyway) known as EcoTank. In most ways, these all-in-one (AIO) printers are much like their Epson Expression and WorkForce counterparts. For example, the topic of this review, the $499.99 MSRP WorkForce ET-4550 EcoTank All-in-One Printer, is essentially the entry-level $129.99 MSRP WorkForce WF-2650, which strongly resembles the WF-2660 reviewed here a few months ago, with the EcoTank ink tanks attached to the right side.

The ET-4550 is one of five initial EcoTank offerings announced today. (For a description of the five models and a more detailed discussion of EcoTank in general,check out this About.com article.)

Read entire review at About.com

Share

Canon’s imageFORMULA DR-C240 Office Document ScannerI have to admit that prior to this gig; I honestly didn’t know that there were so many document scanners in the world—proof, of sorts, that the human race is still printing at an impressive rate. All of the major scanner manufacturers—Canon, Brother, Epson, and HP make several document scanners, ranging in different volumes and prices from a few hundred dollars to upwards of a thousand and beyond.

The good news is that most of them do a decent job, and most come with impressive bundles of optical character recognition (OCR) and document management software. Many Canon models, such as theimageFORMULA DR-M160II Office Document Scanner reviewed here last week, come with the company’s CaptureOnTouch software, as well as several third-party titles from Kofax and document management software from Nuance. Here, though, we are looking at a slightly lower-end machine, Canon’s $799 MSRP imageFORMULA DR-C240 Office Document Scanner.

The DR-C240 is a little slower DR-M160II mentioned above, and it lacks a document management program, per se (though it does come with PDF Pro Office for creating searchable PDFs), even so, it’ll get all butthe most demanding scan jobs done.

Read the entire review at About.com

Share

Brother’s MFC-J4320DW, a Multifunction Wide-Format PrinterThe Printer / Scanner section of About.com has recognized Brother’s Business Smart series of multifunction printers for a number of reasons, often including relatively fast print speeds, overall print quality, a relatively low cost per page, or CPP, and support for wide-format (tabloid, or 11×17-inch) paper. However, the level of support each machine has for tabloid paper varies from model to model.

This brings us to the subject of this review, Brother’s next generation entry-level Business Smart model, the $149.99 MSRP MFC-J4320DW. Like the MFC-J4000 series models before it, such as the MFC-J4420DW I looked at a while back, it takes tabloid-size paper via an override slot on the back of the machine. Hence, you can print only one 11×17-inch page at a time, limiting this particular Brother to an occasional-use wide-format printer—and an all-around great little standard, letter-size machine.
Read the entire review at About.com
Share

HP’s Envy 7640 e-All-in-One PrinterHP’s Envy line of printers have gone through a transition over the years, from somewhat high-end (price-wise) and elegant, if not all that practical. Over the past couple years, though, Envy printers have evolved in to sensible entry-level and midrange all-in-one (AIO) machines designed for home based and small offices, as my recent review of the Envy 5660 e-All-in-One Printer illustrates.

Today, though, we’re looking at the flagship Envy printer, the $199.99 Envy 7640 e-All-in-One Printer, which, by the way, I found for as low as $124.99 while writing this review.

In any case, of the entire Envy line, this one is the most full-featured. However, also like the other Envy AIOs, without HP’s value-added Instant Ink program, which we’ll look at in a minute, it’s too expensive to use.
Read the entire review at About.com
Share

Visioneer RoadWarrior 4D Duplex Mobile Color ScannerThe Printer / Scanner section of About.com has looked at mobile scanners from three of the top imaging companies (Epson, Canon, and HP) recently, and while they all worked well enough, feature sets and capabilities were somewhat diverse. In addition, considering how small they are and what they’re capable of, unless you have an application that requires (or benefits from) the ability to setup and scan in seconds—no matter where you are—there are better choices.

If you do need to scan on the road, though, here’s another good choice, the $149.99 MSRP RoadWarrior 4D Duplex Mobile Color Scanner from a Northern California company that specializes in scanners, Visioneer.

Read entire review at About.com

Share

If you’ve ever looked at the scanner sections of HP’s, Canon’s, Epson’s, or Brother’s Web sites, then you know that there are literally hundreds of models available, ranging in prices from around $50 up to and beyond $2,000. Then too, some specialize in scanning photos, while others excel at document scanning, and some even tout “multipurpose” scanning.

Even so, if you plan to scan a lot of one particular type of document, for the best results you should choose a matching scanner type.

When scanning and cataloging documents, for instance, few scanners work as well as Canon’s imageFORMULA document scanners. And when it comes to midrange machines, I found the company’s imageFORMULA DR-M160II Office Document Scanner, the topic of this review, to be quick, thorough, and accurate.

Read entire review at About.com

Share