Review of the Epson DS-780N Network Color Document Scanner at PCMag

  • PROS

    Networkable via Ethernet. Huge color touch screen control panel. 100-sheet ADF. Control panel supports up to 30 configurable users. Wide security options.

  • CONS

    Somewhat costly. No Wi-Fi or Wi-Fi Direct for mobile connectivity.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The networkable scans relatively quickly and accurately, and it has a huge customizable color touch screen, but it’s overshadowed by some less costly competition.

Similar in features to the Editors’ Choice Brother ImageCenter ADS-3600W ($829.11 at Amazon), the mid-to-high-volume Epson DS-780N Network Color Document Scanner ($1,099.99) ($799.00 at Amazon) is designed for use in small- to medium-size offices and workgroups that need to do a fair amount of document scanning and archiving. It’s not quite as fast as the Brother model, and it doesn’t support wireless networking. It’s competitively accurate, has an intuitive, highly useful touch screen, and comes with efficient document management software, making it a strong alternative to the ADS-3600W, as well as a few other networkable document scanners we’ve reviewed recently. Its price causes it to fall just short of our Editors’ Choice nod, but otherwise the DS-780N is a fine document scanner.
Read entire review at PCMag


Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Low price. Supports Wi-Fi and Ethernet networking, as well as lots of mobile and cloud options. Customizable 2.8-inch color touch screen. Fast scanning and text recognition. Highly accurate OCR.

  • CONS

    No disc in the box. Touch screen somewhat cramped.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Brother’s ADS-2700W is a fast, highly accurate document scanner that comes with Wi-Fi, Ethernet, and numerous mobile and cloud connectivity options for a very reasonable price.

A smaller, lower-capacity, and less-expensive sibling to the Editors’ Choice Brother ImageFormula ADS-3600W ($829.11 at Amazon), the Brother ADS-2700W Wireless High-Speed Desktop Document Scanner ($399.99) ($349.99 at Amazon) is a low- to-mid-volume document scanner designed for micro and small offices and workgroups. Comparable in price and speed to the Epson WorkForce ES-500W ($329.99 at Amazon), which, like the Brother models mentioned here, is networkable, the ADS-2700W is fast and highly accurate for the price. In addition, it comes with an easy-to-use color touch screen and the ability to scan to USB thumb drives, thereby making it an exceptional value, as well as our latest top pick for entry-level networkable document scanners.
See entire review at PCMag


  • Review of the Ricoh SP 5300DN Black and White Laser Printer at PCMagPROS

    Reasonably fast. Good print quality overall. Multiple paper capacity and other expansion options. High, 250,000-page duty cycle. Strong security features. High-yield toner cartridge. Very low running costs.

  • CONS

    Expensive, with costly add-ons. Small, unimpressive control panel. Graphics and photos print slightly too dark.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Ricoh SP 5300DN is a highly capable high-volume single-function monochrome laser printer that produces quality output at reasonably fast speeds, and its low running costs make it a good value for offices that print in volume.

Similar in features, speed, and capacity options to our Editors’ Choice Dell Smart Printer S5830dn ($699.31 at Amazon), the Ricoh SP 5300DN Black and White Laser Printer ($1,229) ($764.98 at Amazon) is a single-function laser printer designed for medium- to high-volume printing in small to midsize offices and workgroups. The Ricoh 5300DN costs a little more than the Dell S5830dn, but it’s significantly smaller and lighter and has more expansion options, and it costs less to use. On the other hand, during testing, graphics and photo output came out slightly subpar—just enough to keep it from receiving our Editors’ Choice nod. Not enough, though, to keep the Ricoh 5300DN from being an excellent choice for churning out thousands of documents each month in busy, high-volume settings.

Read the entire review at PCMag



 

Review of the Epson WorkForce ET-4750 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Excellent output quality. Very low running costs after initial investment. Ships with generous amount of ink. Supports Wi-Fi Direct mobile connectivity. Small and light.

  • CONS

    Slow for the price. High purchase price. Automatic document feeder (ADF) is not auto-duplexing. No NFC support.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson ET-4750 EcoTank AIO printer may be a bit slow, but it prints excellent quality documents and photos at a very low cost per print.

Depending on how much you use it, the Epson WorkForce ET-4750 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer ($499.99) ($399.99 at Amazon) is either a wise investment or a waste of money. Like the WorkForce ET-4550 ($548.88 at Amazon) before it, or its direct competitor, the Canon Pixma G4200 Wireless MegaTank All-in-One Printer (Check on Amazon at Amazon), the ET-4750 is a supertank, or bulk ink printer. Supertank all-in-one (AIO) printers are marketed under the pay-more-up-front-to-pay-less-for-ink-later model. Aside from the way you buy and feed it ink, though, the ET-4750 is roughly a pared-down equivalent to the Editors’ Choice Epson WorkForce Pro WF-4720.(Check on Amazon at Amazon) It’s slow and short on features for a $500 AIO, but it prints quite well, and the ongoing per-page price of ink is minuscule, making it an excellent choice for home-based or small offices or workgroups that need to print or copy from several hundred to a thousand or so pages each month.
Read the entire review at PCMag


  • PROS

    Reasonably fast. Excellent print quality. Strong paper expansion capacity. High-yield toner cartridge. Very low running costs. Strong security features.

  • CONS

    Expensive printer and add-ons. Fax, OCR, and Wi-Fi cost extra. ADF duplexer is not single-pass.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Ricoh MP 501SPF monochrome laser AIO comes with a wealth of top-drawer features and expansion options. It prints capably, fast, and at a very low cost per page, but the printer itself will cost you.

Price: $2,096.73
Was: $2,225.20
Designed for midsize to large offices and workgroups, the RicohBlack and White Laser Multifunction Printer ($3,499) ($2,096.73 at Amazon) means business—and then some. Out of the box it comes with a richer feature set and greater functionality than your average high-volume monochrome laser all-in-one (AIO), and if it doesn’t do what you want by default, rest assured, there’s an add-on that can.In addition to printing well, and fast, everything about the 501SPF—its huge monthly duty cycle, highly expandable high-capacity paper input, tablet-size touch screen control panel, 350GB hard drive, and incredibly low cost per page—screams high-volume. Even so, too many of the most useful and more common features, such as Wi-Fi, fax, and optical character recognition (OCR), are (often expensive) add-ons, given its lofty price, which is just enough to preclude it from gaining our Editors’ Choice nod. Aside from that, though, the 501SPF is a highly capable and sophisticated high-volume monochrome laser printer.
Read the entire review at PCMag


 

As we’ve noted before, there are a lot of single-function and multifunction, or all-in-one (AIO), monochrome laser printers in the world. Over the past year or so, we’ve looked at several from Brother, Canon, HP, Dell, Oki Data, Samsung, and Xerox, and haven’t come close to reviewing them all. And there are still more models from other manufacturers not listed above, one of them being a long-established maker of laser printers and other office equipment worldwide—Ricoh. Today’s review model, the $455-list Ricoh SP 377SFNwX Black and White Laser Multifunction Printer ($347.00 at Amazon) at Amazon), is the first of a few Ricoh machines that we’ll be reviewing soon.

Paying just under $500 usually gets you a midrange, medium-volume monochrome laser AIO. The 377SFNwX’s price positions it between Brother’s MFC-L5700DW  ($280.25 at Amazon) and Canon’s ImageClass D1550 ($324.00 at Amazon); however, the Ricoh’s 30,000-page maximum monthly duty cycle suggests that it’s less capable by several thousand pages than these and other closely priced monochrome laser AIOs, including the Brother MFC-L6800DW ($593.46 at Amazon) and Canon ImageClass D1520.($249.00 at Amazon) Unless, that is, you evaluate them from a different number, the recommended monthly volume, which in most cases is a much more relevant figure. The Ricoh model’s 5,800-page recommended volume is more than a couple of thousand pages higher than most of the other monochrome AIOs mentioned here.

Despite its lower duty cycle, as you’ll see in the Cost Per Page section later, the 377SFNwX delivers lower running costs than most other midrange monochrome laser AIOs, which, if you’re printing thousands of pages each month, is a very important consideration. Also important is how well the AIO prints. Although during our tests our Ricoh review unit churned out graphics and photos slightly darker than we like, its overall print quality is quite good, especially when printing text.

Ricoh SP 377SFNwX (Left Angled)

As you’ll see in the Design & Features section coming up next, the 377SFNwX is also significantly smaller and lighter than most of the AIOs mentioned here so far. In fact, its size is closer to that of an entry-level model, such as, say, Canon’s $300-list ImageClass MF249dw.($149.00 at Amazon) Even so, it comes with just about every production and convenience feature you can get on a laser AIO in this class, including an auto-duplexing automatic document feeder (ADF) and a plethora of standard and mobile connectivity methods.

Not as stylish as Canon’s latest round of monochrome lasers, nor as volume-capable and expandable as Brother’s current midrange black-and-white laser AIOs, the Ricoh 377SFNwX nevertheless has its charms, to the extent that if its overall print quality were just a wee bit better, it would have easily walked away with our Editors’ Choice nod. Otherwise, it is an ideal mid-volume workhorse for your small office’s or workgroup’s internal communications, as well as frontline situations, such as the front desks at doctors’ and dentists’ offices, auto repair shops, and anywhere else quick, short text documents are required.

Read the entire review at Computer Shopper



 

See the entire article at Digital TrendsBefore the current Wi-Fi standard, called 802.11ac, wireless broadband was never quite robust enough: Too many devices were vying for your limited, inefficiently distributed bandwidth. This latest standard has proven faster and more reliable, and WiGig and mesh networking will help. But with the ever-increasing proliferation of Wi-Fi devices — PCs, smartphones, tablets, webcams, printers, wearables, refrigerators, and more — it won’t be long until we’re playing catch up again.

According to estimates by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the number of internet-connected gadgets for an average family of four is now at 10 per household. The cross-government trade group estimates that number will reach 50 wirelessly connected devices by 2022 — all competing for the same bandwidth, over the same connection.

“The Wi-Fi device and traffic explosion, higher density Wi-Fi deployments, growing use of outdoor Wi-Fi, and the need to support a great variety of different device types will require more efficient Wi-Fi implementations that can help to deliver richer experiences for enterprise and consumer applications that are hungry for bandwidth,” according to Andrew Zignani, Senior Analyst at ABI Research.

The good news in all this is that the people who tend to Wi-Fi standards haven’t been idle. The 6th generation of Wi-Fi, 802.11ax, is in the final stages of certification, and new products based on the standard are underway. Broadcom, a maker of circuit boards and other gizmos that drive today’s information technology, has just announced Max Wifi, the first 802.11ax chips designed for use in routers for homes and businesses, as well as wireless gadgets such as smartphones and tablets.

The need for massive increases in bandwidth and throughput is upon us. The question is, is 802.11ax enough, or is it too little too late?

Read the entire review at Digital Trends


 

Review of the Canon Pixma TS3120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One at PCMag

  • PROS

    Low price. Compact and light. Bluetooth 4.0 support. Good print quality overall.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder. Only two ink cartridges. Lacks SD card and USB thumb drive support. High cost per page. Maximum 5-by-7-inch photo output size. Slow document printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The budget-friendly Canon Pixma TS3120 prints text, graphics and photos well enough, but its low price also means having to forgo some convenient features.

The Canon Pixma TS3120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($79.99) ($59.00 at Amazon) is one of very few inkjet printers with the distinction of a sub-$80 list price (and its street price of $49.99 means that you can actually buy it for less than $50, making it all the more unique). Not only is this one of the least-expensive consumer-grade photo all-in one (AIO) printers we’ve reviewed recently, it’s also one of the smallest, slowest, and shortest on features. Like the HP DeskJet 3755, the TS3120 is designed for families and homes that do very little printing and copying—a sort of there-when-you-need-it device. In that role, it’s a lower-cost alternative to the Canon Pixma TS5020 or the significantly more-expensive Editors’ Choice Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless 
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One at PCMag

  • PROS

    Lightweight and compact. Two additional ink cartridges for higher-quality photos. Two paper input trays. SD card, Ethernet, and Bluetooth 4.0 support. Excellent print quality. Fast snapshot printing.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder. Lacks NFC and Wi-Fi Direct. Slow document printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Though it lacks an automatic document feeder, the six-ink Canon Pixma TS9120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One printer produces exceptional text, graphics, and photos.

The flagship model in Canon’s Pixma TS-series consumer-grade photo all-in-one (AIO) inkjet printers, the Canon Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($199) ($149.99 at Amazon) replaces the Pixma TS9020 ($64.99 at Amazon) we reviewed earlier this year. Like its sibling, the Pixma TS8020, ($97.99 at Amazon) a top pick, the TS9120 is a six-ink machine designed to print primarily photographs, and that it does quite well. It prints and copies documents well, too, but sluggishly, compared with its business-oriented counterparts, and it lacks an automatic document feeder (ADF). However, its outstanding output quality, larger display, and Ethernet support for just $20 more than the Canon TS8020 makes it well-deserving of our Editors’ Choice as a consumer-grade photo and occasional document printer for home and family use.
Read the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Canon Pixma TS6120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One at PCMag

  • PROS

    Takes up little space. Five ink cartridges for higher-quality text and photos. Two paper-input trays. Bluetooth 4.0 support. Excellent print quality, especially photos. Prints photos fast.

  • CONS

    No automatic document feeder, SD card or USB thumb drive support. Lacks NFC and Wi-Fi Direct. Slow document printing.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Canon Pixma TS6120 prints exceptional text, graphics and photos, but an automatic document feeder, memory drive support, and lower running costs would make it more attractive.

Part of a recent debut of five new TS-series Pixmas, the Canon Pixma TS6120 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One ($149.99) ($99.99  at Amazon) replaces the Pixma TS6020 as a low-volume photo-centric all-in-one (AIO) printer for family and home office use. Aside from the addition of Bluetooth and a few other small tweaks, the TS6120 isn’t much different from its predecessor. It looks and prints the same, and at the same speeds, for the same list price, which is about $50 less than the Editors’ Choice Canon Pixma TS9120. Like most consumer-grade photo printers in this price range, the TS6120 is slow, and it has no automatic document feeder (ADF). It prints quite well, though—especially photos—making it a sensible lower-cost alternative to the pricier and more-expensive-to-use Canon TS9120.
Read the entire review at PCMag