Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Fast scanning. Excellent optical-character-recognition (OCR) accuracy. Massive input capacity. Supports tabloid-size and larger pages. Robust, easy-to-use software.

  • CONS

    Slow at saving to searchable PDF.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Kodak i3300 is a fast, high-volume document scanner, and it comes with excellent full-featured scanning and processing software at a competitive price.

Positioned between the Editors’ Choice Kodak i3250 and the highly capable Kodak i3500, the Kodak i3300 Scanner ($4,495) is one of Kodak Alaris’ i3000 series of heavy-duty, high-volume document scanners. Like several of its siblings, the i3300 quickly and accurately scans one-and two-sided documents up to tabloid-size (11-by-17 inches) and beyond. Compared with some other document scanners we’ve tested, it’s a bit slow when scanning to searchable PDF, but not enough so to detract from its suitability for midsize-to-large document-management systems. That makes it a highly sensible choice—and our new top pick—as a wide-format high-volume document scanner for large workgroups and medium-size offices.
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Review of the HP LaserJet Enterprise M653x at PCMag

  • PROS

    Very fast. Good overall print quality. Strong paper-input capacity. Very-high-yield toner cartridges. Customizable control panel. Memory is upgradeable to 2GB. Optional hard drive.

  • CONS

    Expensive. Running costs can be high. Subpar photo output. Software and driver installation via the web is problematic.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    HP’s LaserJet Enterprise M653x prints terrific-looking text and graphics, and so-so photos, at an impressive clip, but its running costs are a bit high—especially for such a pricey color laser printer.

HP’s LaserJet Pro laser printers are designed primarily to support small-to-medium-size offices, workgroups, and businesses consisting of about five or so users. The company’s LaserJet Enterprise models, such as the LaserJet Enterprise M653x standalone color laser printer ($2,149), however, are aimed more toward larger offices, workgroups, and corporations with up to 40 or so networked users. In many ways—high print quality, high maximum-duty cycles, and expandability—these two LaserJet brands are often similar.The Enterprise machines, however, are typically faster; they come with significantly higher recommended monthly print volumes, access to higher-yield toner cartridges that deliver lower running costs, and, of course higher purchase prices. The M653x provides all that and more, but given its high price, slightly too-high cost per page, and subpar photo output, it comes up a bit short to make it a top pick mid-to-heavy volume color laser printer for larger workgroups, offices, and enterprises.Read the entire review at PCMag


 

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Review of the Canon imageClass LBP251dw at PCMag

  • PROS

    Outstanding print quality. Respectable print speed. Low price. Two paper-input sources. Expandable paper-input capacity. Relatively small and light. Department ID Manager feature lets you control access by user or group of users.

  • CONS

    Slightly high running costs. No memory-drive support.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Canon’s imageClass LBP251dw monochrome laser prints terrific-looking text, graphics, and grayscale photos at a respectable speed for the price, but lower running costs would increase its overall value.

A direct competitor to the Dell Smart Printer S2830dn, our Editors’ Choice entry-level monochrome laser printer, the Canon imageClass LBP251dw ($209) comes close to the Dell model in print speed, print quality and features, and its list price is $70 less. But it falls a little short in one key area—the per-page cost of toner. This may seem insignificant, but if you print a few thousand pages or so each month, even a 1-cent difference in the cost per page (CPP) will cost you significantly over the life of the printer, far more than that $70 price difference. Otherwise, the LBP251dw is an outstanding low-priced monochrome laser printer, making it an excellent alternative to the Dell S2830dn for low-to-moderate volume output in a home-based or small office, or as a personal monochrome laser printer.
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Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Fast output. Good print quality. Excellent label design, print software, and mobile apps. Prints two-color, black/red labels. Good selection of label types. Good value for the price.

  • CONS

    Per-label media cost is somewhat high. Ability to print in red limited to one label type.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Brother QL-800 prints several sizes of high-quality label types from your PC, Mac, or Android mobile device via USB, making it an excellent value for its relatively low price.

Like its higher-end QL-810W and QL-820NWB siblings, the Brother QL-800 ($99.99) is a reasonably fast label printer that churns out good-looking labels in several different types and sizes, ranging from small one-line barcodes, to address labels, and everything in between. It can print labels up to about 0.5 inch wide by 1 inch long to 2.4 inches wide by 36 inches long.
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  • https://assets.pcmag.com/media/images/551745-brother-ql-810w.jpg?thumb=y&width=1659&height=1500PROS

    Respectable print quality. Prints in black and red. Prints labels fast. Terrific label design. Great print software and robust mobile app. Wide selection of label types.

  • CONS

    Per-label cost is high. Battery costs extra. Ability to print in red limited to one label type. QL-820NWB offers much more for not a lot more money.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Brother QL-810W label maker prints a wide variety of high-quality label types from your PC or mobile device, but its higher-end sibling provides significantly more features and versatility for just a little more money.

The Brother QL-810W ($149.99) label printer is a step down from the recent Editors’ Choice QL-820NWB. Although these two labelers essentially print the same types of labels at the same speeds over wireless networks or from mobile devices, what you give up feature-wise for the $50 list price difference between them is significant. With the QL-810W, for instance, you forgo a few different types of connectivity options, as well as the ability to use the label maker apart from a computing device. Overall, though, the Q-810W is a versatile and capable option, well worth considering for designing and printing many types of business labels via Wi-Fi, or from your team’s tablets and smartphones.
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  • Editors' ChoicePROS

    Fast print speeds. Good print quality. Multiple network and mobile connectivity options. Excellent label design. Great print software and mobile app. Prints in black and red. Operates as standalone label maker and printer with optional battery.

  • CONS

    Consumables somewhat costly on a per-label basis. Battery costs extra. Ability to print in red limited to one label type.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Brother QL-820NWB is a feature-rich label maker capable of churning out professional-looking output quickly and efficiently.

Recently, Brother announced the QL-800-series as new additions to its stable of professional label printers, which includes the flagship model, the QL-820NWB ($199.99), reviewed here. The QL-820NWB is similar in many ways to its QL-720NW predecessor in that it’s networkable and it comes with highly capable software. It’s also well-integrated with mobile devices, and it comes with a robust set of features and options, such as a broad assortment of printable media, the ability to print two-color labels, and an add-on rechargeable battery. Flexibility, a rich feature set, wide-ranging PC and mobile device integration, and a wide selection of label media elevates the QL-820NWB to our new top pick for a networkable professional label printer.

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Review of the Epson Expression 12000XL-PH at PCMagPROS

  • High-resolution, wide-format scanning. Scans slides, negatives, and transparencies, as well as reflective photos and artwork. Highly accurate color and detail.

  • CONS

    Expensive. Big and heavy. Transparency unit comes uninstalled.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson Expression 12000XL-PH is a large, tabloid-size graphics arts and photograph scanner that is compatible with a large array of media and produces excellent output.

The wide-format Epson Expression 12000XL-PH ($3429.99) is the professional photographers’ version of the Expression 12000XL-GA, an oversize professional graphic artists’ flatbed scanner. Essentially, these two machines are the same, except that the PH version comes with a transparency unit for scanning slides, transparencies, and negatives. While you can buy the scanner itself and opt for the transparency unit later, purchasing them together, in the same box, saves you about $130. Either way, its price is substantial for a flatbed scanner, but graphic artists, photographers, and desktop publishers will find the 12000XL-PH a highly accurate and quality tool for digitizing not only slides, transparencies, and film, but also photos and artwork up to tabloid-size (11 by 17 inches).
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Review of the Brother MFC-J6930DW AIO printer at PCMag

  • PROS

    Prints, scans, copies, and faxes tabloid-size pages. Competitively fast. Low running costs. Single-pass auto-duplexing ADF. Three paper input sources. Good print quality overall.

  • CONS

    Subpar graphics.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    This business-centric color inkjet all-in-one printer is relatively fast, with good print quality, competitively low running costs, and flexible paper handling.

Not long ago, A3 (tabloid, or 11-by-17-inch) all-in-one (AIO) printers, such as the Editors’ Choice HP OfficeJet Pro 7740, were somewhat rare, and expensive. But not anymore. One reason is that a few years ago Brother made them a staple in its Business Smart Pro line, which includes the MFC-J6930DW ($299.99) reviewed here. Like the HP model, the MFC-J6930DW comes with two big paper input trays, a single-pass auto-duplexing automatic document feeder (ADF), and a slew of mobile connectivity features. This Brother AIO prints well overall, with competitively low running costs, and it’s relatively fast, but its graphics output could be better. Despite costing a little more upfront, but with lower running costs overall, the MFC-J6930DW is a viable alternative to the OfficeJet 7740 for low-to-moderate volume printing in a small or micro office or workgroup.
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  • Review of the Canon ImageClass D570 monochrome laser AIO at PCMagPROS

    Good overall print quality. Respectable print speed. Relatively low price. Two paper input sources.

  • CONS

    High running costs. Lacks automatic document feeder. No memory drive support.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    Canon’s ImageClass D570 mono laser all-in-one printer produces good-looking text and passable graphics at a respectable speed for the price, but an ADF is sorely missing.

A step down from the Editors’ Choice ImageClass MF249dw, the ImageClass D570 ($229.99) is an entry-level monochrome all-in-one (AIO) laser printer designed for use in a home-based or micro office, a small workgroup, or as a personal AIO. A significant difference between the D570 and its $299 sibling is that the latter comes with an automatic document feeder (ADF) for sending multipage documents to the scanner, whereas the former does not. In testing, the MF249dw and the D570 produced similar print quality. These two small laser AIOs have much in common, making the ImageClass D570 a decent less-expensive alternative to the MF249dw as a light-duty monochrome laser AIO.Read the entire review on PCMag


 

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  • Review of the Visioneer Patriot H80 document scanner at PCMagPROS

    Very fast scanning and saving to PDF. Above-average OCR accuracy. 10,000-page daily duty cycle. Comprehensive software bundle includes PDF creation and editing and document management software.

  • CONS

    Pricey. Not notably faster than much-less-expensive sibling.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    A remarkably fast workhorse document scanner, the Visioneer Patriot H80 is quicker and more accurate than most of its competitors, including its slightly lower-rated, less-expensive Patriot H60 sibling—but not enough to justify a hefty price difference.

Aside from a higher price and faster scanning speeds, the Visioneer Patriot H80 ($1,595) is identical to the Editors’ Choice Visioneer Patriot H60. Both sheet-feed document scanners have the same daily duty cycles, the same size automatic document feeders (ADFs), and they come with the same software bundle. In addition, both machines are quite fast, even when scanning and saving to searchable PDF. As sheet-feed document scanners go, the Patriot H80 is one of the fastest, and it’s highly accurate, making it well-suited for medium-to-heavy volume scanning in small- or mid-size offices and workgroups, but unless you need all the speed you can possibly get, the huge price difference between it and its less-expensive sibling seems excessive.

Read the entire review at PCMag

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