Review of the Epson DS-1630 Flatbed Color Document Scanner at PCMagThe Epson DS-1630 Flatbed Color Document Scanner ($299.99) is a low-volume document scanner designed for small and home-based offices. It combines the versatility of a flatbed and a sheet-feed scanner with an automatic document feeder (ADF), and supports automatic duplex scanning. But unlike many competing models, including the same-priced HP ScanJet Pro 2500 f1 Flatbed Scanner and the more expensive Editors’ Choice Canon imageFormula DR-2020U, the DS-1630 has only one sensor, making it slow at scanning two-sided pages. Even so, it’s buoyed by its generous software bundle and competitively accurate optical character recognition (OCR) capabilities.

Read the entire review at PCMag

Share

Review of the Canon Pixma G3200 Wireless MegaTank All-in-One Printer at PCMagThe Canon Pixma G3200 Wireless MegaTank All-in-One Printer ($299.99) is a low-volume all-in-one printer (AIO) intended for small or home-based offices. Like the recently reviewed Pixma G1200, a standalone model, the G3200 is one of Canon’s MegaTank G-Series machines designed to compete directly with Epson’s EcoTank and Brother’s INKvestment printers, such as the Expression ET-2550 EcoTank All-in-One Printer and the MFC-J985DW XL, respectively. Like the G1200, the G3200 prints exceptionally well, especially photographs, and its running costs are highly competitive. It comes without an automatic document feeder (ADF) for sending multipage originals to the scanner—a feature that any $300 inkjet AIO should come with. That and a missing mobile connectivity feature or two, and its lack of fax capabilities, are just enough to keep it from replacing the Brother model as Editors’ Choice as an inkjet AIO for use in a small, home, or micro office.

Read the entire review at PCMag

Share

Review of the Canon Pixma TS5020 Wireless Inkjet All-in-One Printer at PCMagThe least-expensive all-in-one printer (AIO) in Canon’s new Pixma TS series, the Pixma TS5020 Wireless All-in-One Printer ($99.99), is a low-cost, low-volume model designed for home use. A primary difference between it and the pricier and more feature-rich TS9020 and TS8020 (the latter an Editors’ Choice) is that the TS5020 uses five inks rather than six. Unlike another Editors’ Choice, the Brother MFC-J985DW (an entry-level office-centric AIO), none of these Pixmas come with automatic document feeders (ADFs), making them less suitable for home-based office use. Like the TS8020, though, the TS5020’s text and photo output is very strong, but it did struggle some in testing when printing dark fills and backgrounds in Excel charts and PowerPoint handouts. Otherwise, it’s an inexpensive alternative to the TS8020 for low-volume printing of photos and documents for home users.

Read the entire review at PCMag

Share

Review of the Canon Maxify MB2120 Wireless Home Office Inkjet PrinterThe Canon Maxify MB2120 Wireless Home Office Inkjet Printer ($179.99) is a one-drawer version of the Editors’ Choice Maxify MB2720 Wireless Home Office Inkjet Printer we reviewed a few months ago. In both performance and output quality, the MB2120, the MB2720, and the Canon Maxify MB5420 reviewed here recently, behaved much the same—fast enough for use as an entry-level home or home-based office all-in-one printer, with above-average print, scan, and copy quality. The MB2120’s paper capacity, only half that of those two printers, ensures that the MB5420 remains our Editors’ Choice. The Canon Maxify MB5120 is best as a low-cost alternative meant for lighter-duty use.

Read the entire review at PCMag

Share

Review of the Epson WorkForce ET-16500 EcoTank Wide-Format All-in-One Supertank Printer at PCMagThe Epson WorkForce Pro ET-16500 EcoTank Wide-Format All-in-One Supertank Printer ($999.99) is the first wide-format inkjet printer we’ve looked at in Epson’s EcoTank line, which uses ink tanks or bottles in place of cartridges. As such, it can print pages up to supertabloid size (13 by 19), as well as scan, copy, and fax tabloid (11-by-17) pages. Overall, the ET-16500 is a fine printer, but it performed slowly during some of our benchmark tests, and, at $1,000, it’s expensive to purchase. Its running costs, though, are low enough to take the sting out of the purchase price—as long as you use it frequently, that is.

Read the entire review at PCMag

Share

Review of the Epson Expression ET-3600 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer at PCMagEpson’s EcoTank printers promise very low running costs over time, at the expense of a higher purchase price, and the Epson Expression ET-3600 EcoTank All-in-One Supertank Printer ($399.99) is no exception. In terms of price, capacity, and features, it fits between two of the previous EcoTank inkjets we’ve reviewed, the Epson Expression ET-2550 EcoTank All-in-One Printer and the Epson WorkForce ET-4550 EcoTank All-in-One Printer. These printers makes sense only if you print enough to justify paying a significant additional up-front cost for the initial bottles of ink that come in the box—in this case, what Epson claims is two years’ worth, or enough to print 11,000 black-and-white and/or 8,500 color pages. But if you do print enough, the ET-3600 can be a terrific deal.

Read the entire review at PCMag

Share

Review of the Epson SureColor P800 at PCMagToday’s better near-dedicated photo printers, including the Epson SureColor P800, produce remarkably good, professional-quality prints. The P800 ($1,295) is similar in price, capacity, and print quality to the Canon imagePrograf PRO-1000, which recently became our Editors’ Choice C-size (17-inch paper width) professional photo printer. The P800 offers the option to print on paper rolls measuring either 13 or 17 inches wide and up to 10 feet long. For those who need it, that capability is significant enough for the P800 to edge out the PRO-1000 to earn Editors’ Choice honors as well.

Read the entire review at PCMag

Share

Canon Pixma G1200 MegaTank Printer review at PCMagThe Canon Pixma G1200 MegaTank Inkjet Printer ($249.99) is a low-volume standalone inkjet printer designed for small or home-based offices. A direct response to the Epson EcoTank and the Brother INKvestment products designed to deliver low per-page ink costs, the G1200 is one of Canon’s new MegaTank G-series printers. But as a single-function printer it’s not really in direct competition with any of them. (All of the EcoTank and INKvestment products, as well as the other three Canon G-series models, are all-in-one machines.) A closer competitor is the Editors’ Choice HP OfficeJet Pro 6230, another standalone printer. The G1200 is a lot slower than the HP model, but print quality is excellent and running costs are some of the best in the business. Even so, the G1200 does not support networking, whether Wi-Fi or direct mobile connectivity—a feature every $250 printer should have.

See the entire review at PCMag.

Share

Review of Brother MFC-L5700DW at PCMagThe Brother MFC-L5700DW ($349.99) is a capable midrange monochrome laser all-in-one printer designed for micro offices and small workgroups. It has a generous standard paper capacity that’s highly expandable, and text print quality is above average (though grayscale graphics and photos are not as good). Like the Editors’ Choice HP LaserJet Pro MFP M426fdw, it’s inexpensive and small enough to serve as a relatively high-volume personal machine. Unlike the M426fdw, though, the MFC-L5700DW’s automatic document feeder (ADF) is not auto-duplexing. Because of that, and a comparatively low monthly duty cycle, its $100 lower list price is not quite enough to help it replace the LaserJet as our top choice for heavy-duty use in a micro office.

See the full review at PCMag

Share

Brother ImageCenter ADS-2000e at PCmagThe Brother ImageCenter ADS-2000e ($349.99) is an apt, low-priced sheet-fed document scanner designed for low- to midrange-volume scanning in a small office, and it should also make a good personal document scanner. Like the Editors’ Choice Canon imageFormula DR-C225, it comes with an assortment of top-tier scanning and optical character recognition (OCR) software, as well as document and business card management applications. While its scanning speeds come close to matching Brother’s ratings, it’s a bit slow at saving to searchable PDF. It’s still fast enough for the price, though, and its OCR accuracy approaches that of higher-priced competitors, making it a solid budget-friendly alternative to the Canon DR-C225.

See the entire review at PCMag

Share