Scanners : William Harrel – Journalist

Review of the Epson DS-320 Portable Duplex Document Scanner With ADF at PCMa

  • PROS

    Highly accurate OCR. Fast scanning and saving to both image and searchable PDF. Comprehensive software bundle. 20-page single-pass ADF.

  • CONS

    Lacks battery. No wireless connectivity.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson DS-320 is a fast and accurate portable document scanner, but its slightly more expensive sibling offers more road-ready features.

The Epson DS-320 Portable Duplex Document Scanner With ADF ($249) is fast and accurate, much like its higher-end sibling, the Editors’ Choiced Epson WorkForce ES-300W. This smaller, less-expensive iteration mimics the ES-300W in appearance, volume, and functionality in most ways, but the $50 list-price difference means giving up wireless networking and a built-in battery. If you don’t need these features, though, you can save the 50 bucks and still get a highly capable portable sheet-feed document scanner for the road.

Read the entire review at PCMag

Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Comprehensive software bundle. Highly accurate OCR. Fast scanning, processing, and saving to both image and searchable PDF.

  • CONS

    Lacks built-in wireless, mobile options, and networking.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson WorkForce DS-770 desktop document scanner is fast and highly accurate, helping it stand out from a crowded pack of competitors.

The competition in the midrange sheet-feed desktop document scanner genre, where the Epson WorkForce DS-770 Color Document Scanner ($549) fits squarely, is fierce. Designed for small- to medium-size offices and workgroups, or perhaps as a busy personal scanner, the DS-770 costs a little more than the Editors’ Choice HP ScanJet Pro 3000 s3 Sheet-Feed Scanner, but it’s also a bit faster and somewhat more accurate. The Epson’s excellent mix of features and performance knocks the ScanJet Pro 3000 from its top spot perch in our lineup of midrange non-networkable document scanners.

Read the entire review at PCMag



Review of the Panasonic KV-S1026C-MKII at PCMag

    • PROS

      Great optical character recognition (OCR) accuracy. Comprehensive software bundle. Faster than manufacturer’s ratings when scanning and saving to image and searchable PDF. Three-year warranty.

    • CONS

      Pricey. No network connectivity. Slower than competitors that cost half as much. Neat Cloud Service expires after three years.

BOTTOM LINE

  • The Panasonic KV-S1026C-MKII is a relatively fast and highly accurate entry-level desktop document scanner; all it really needs is a lower price.

An update to the Panasonic KV-S1026C we reviewed back in 2013, the Panasonic KV-S1026C-MKII ($600.99) is not only significantly faster than its predecessor, but it’s more accurate and comes with a better software bundle. This latest iteration really is a fine entry-level desktop sheet-feed document scanner, but it’s up against some stiff, less-costly competition, such as the Editors’ Choice Brother ADS-2700W Wireless High-Speed Desktop Document Scanner. The KV-S1026C-MKII is designed for use in home-based and small or micro offices or workgroups, or even as a personal desktop document scanner. While it is unquestionably well-suited for these environments, it simply costs too much to take its place among our top-choice candidates.

Read the entire review at PCMag



Review of the Visioneer Patriot P15 portable document scanner at PCMag

  • PROS

    Good OCR accuracy. Reasonably fast overall scanning. Robust software bundle. High duty cycle.

  • CONS

    Slower than competitors at saving to searchable PDF. Documents are rearranged during output. Slightly overpriced based on feature set.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Visioneer Patriot P15 scans quickly and accurately overall, and it has a huge daily duty cycle for a portable scanner, but comparable models offer better value.

The Visioneer Patriot P15 ($339.99) is designed for business professionals who need to scan multipage documents on the road. It’s light and compact, accurate, and reasonably fast, but comes up short against the Editors’ Choice Epson WorkForce ES-300W’s higher-end feature set, which includes support for wireless networking and a battery for cable-free operation. The P15 is a bit overpriced compared with the ES-300W and its additional perks, but it’s still a fine little portable scanner, especially if you can find it on sale or Visioneer drops the price.
Read entire review at PCMag


Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Fast scanning. High daily duty cycle. Robust software. Built-in tablet control panel, keyboard, and hard disk.

  • CONS

    Costly. Big and heavy.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The HP Digital Sender Flow 8500, with its tablet control panel and built-in keyboard and hard disk, is a powerful, if expensive, network document scanner for midsize to large offices.

High-end network document scanners continue getting slicker and more self-contained. The HP Digital Sender Flow 8500 fn2 Document Capture Workstation ($2,999.99) has sophisticated features including a built-in scanner interface and onboard hard disk for saving files. It may cost an eye-watering $1,000 more than the Editors’ Choice Canon imageFormula ScanFront 400, but it’s faster and richer in features, making it our top pick for high-volume scanning in a midsize to large office or enterprise setting.
Read the entire article at PCMag


The Alaris S2080w Scanner by Kodak Alaris at PCMag

    • PROS

      Fast scanning. Saves to both image and searchable PDF reasonably quickly. Above-average OCR accuracy. Comprehensive, innovative software.

    • CONS

      Pricey. Accessories are expensive.

BOTTOM LINE

  • The top-of-the-line Alaris S2080w Scanner is fast, accurate, and feature-packed, but its high price makes it tough to recommend over its less-expensive, also-capable sibling.

The Alaris S2080w Scanner ($1,795) is the flagship model in Kodak Alaris’s line of S2000-series desktop document scanners. It’s essentially the same as the Editors’ Choice Alaris S2060w, which is just a bit slower and has a reduced daily duty cycle, but lists for $500 less. If you’re looking for a fast, accurate, networkable desktop document scanner designed as a mid- to high-volume data-capture point for large enterprises, the Alaris S2080w will do the job well. But if your business can sacrifice a bit on speed and duty cycle, the S2060w is a better value.
See the entire review at PCMag


Review of the Alaris S2060w Scanner by Kodak Alaris at PCMagAs networkable desktop document scanners increase in prevalence, their features become more slick, which is certainly the case with the Alaris S2060w Scanner ($1,295). It’s not only loaded with connectivity features, but it’s also slightly faster and more accurate than the Editors’ Choice Brother ImageCenter ADS-3600W. In addition, the Alaris S2060w comes with a powerful, highly productive scanner interface utility, Kodak’s own homegrown document-managing and indexing software, and a slew of other attractive amenities. These perks give the S2060w a solid push into our top position for medium- to heavy-volume document scanners for midsize to large organizations.

Read the entire review at PCMag

  • PROSEditors' Choice

    Excellent photo quality. Prints borderless images from 4 by 6 inches to 13 by 19 inches. Uses new Claria Photo HD inks. Small and light for an oversize printer.

  • CONS   

    Running costs a bit high. Prints speeds are slower than the competition.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The consumer-grade Epson Expression Photo HD XP-15000 Wide-Format Inkjet Printer produces output quality that’s comparable with much more expensive professional models.

[amazon_link asins=’B076PLTQQT’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’8d38e8d9-1e3f-11e8-b646-9f7c7a3c13ec’]When it comes to consumer-grade supertabloid (13-by-19-inch) inkjet photo printers, the only one I knew of before the Epson Photo HD XP-15000 Wide-Format Printer ($349.99) is the Editors’ Choice  Canon Pixma iP8720 Wireless Inkjet Photo Printer. Both are single-function (print only) models. Both six-ink machines print exceptionally well, especially photos, and they’re priced similarly, but the XP-15000 has better paper-handling options and connectivity features, as well as a more modern and easier-to-use control panel on the rear of the machine just enough to ease into our top choice slot for wide-format consumer-grade photo printers.
Read the entire review at PCMag
  • PROSReview of Epson WorkForce DS-575W Wireless Color Document Scanner at PCMag

    Fast scanning and saving to PDF. Comes with document and business card management software. Wi-Fi networking. Strong software bundle.

  • CONS

    Could be more accurate when scanning serif fonts. Ethernet is extra and expensive.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson scans reasonably quickly and accurately, making it a good choice for small offices that need a document scanner with a simple feature set.

 [amazon_textlink asin=’B0733NHFK4′ text=’WorkForce DS-575W’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’40b5a13f-1dae-11e8-a0e1-799860794bb0′]The Epson WorkForce DS-575W ($399.99) is a low- to mid-volume document scanner designed for micro and small offices and workgroups. It’s comparable in price and speed to the Editors’ Choice Brother ADS-2700W Wireless High-Speed Desktop Document Scanner.[amazon_link asins=’B0757Z7NLC’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’a1546358-1dad-11e8-a2a4-a7b654ad9708′] The DS-575W is a fine desktop scanner, but the Brother model supports Ethernet networking and is considerably more accurate. That said, there are plenty of small-office and home-based-office scenarios where Ethernet isn’t required, and where the DS-575W would make a good personal scanner. It’s not robust enough to dislodge the Brother ADS-2700W from its top slot, but it’s still a fine little entry- to mid-level desktop scanner.Read the entire review at PCMag.



 

Revoke pf the Kodak Photo Printer Mini at Computer ShopperApparently, dedicated photo printers like the $99.99 Kodak Photo Printer Mini [amazon_link asins=’B01KO0T5VA’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’d9f001ca-0aa0-11e8-a422-2f78ad097aa8′]  we’re reviewing here today are quite popular. Three of the four major inkjet printer makers—Canon, Epson, and HP—offer at least one standalone snapshot printer, and Kodak, which was once a major inkjet printer vendor itself (back when there were five), offers several, including the Kodak Photo Printer Dock [amazon_link asins=’B01MRKFTQJ’ template=’CopyOf-PriceLink’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’c0dd3de2-0aa0-11e8-bdb6-d9a3ac146d0d’] we reviewed a few months ago.

Over the years, as the Information Age has transitioned increasingly from desktop computing devices to handhelds, standalone snapshot printers like these two Kodak machines, HP’s SprocketCanon’s Selphy CP1200, and a few others have evolved with them. Nowadays, several snapshot printers, including the Sprocket, Kodak Photo Printer Dock, and now the Kodak Photo Mini, work exclusively with smartphones and tablets, forgoing desktop and laptop PC compatibility altogether.

[amazon_link asins=’B01KO0T5VA’ template=’ProductAd’ store=’store-1′ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’f5e76d95-0aa0-11e8-acbe-b16a52ca028d’]As with the HP Sprocket, the only way to print to, configure, or gain access to the Kodak Mini at all is via your mobile device and the company’s Kodak Photo Printer app. And, as with the Kodak Dock and the Sprocket, you can print only one size photo; in this case 2.1 by 3.4 inches, which is about the same as the average business card. HP’s Sprocket output size, at 2 by 3 inches, is similar, and the Kodak Dock, at 4 by 6 inches, is designed to churn out snapshots about twice the size.

We don’t, of course, evaluate these little printers on the same terms as their full-size document printer counterparts. Here, the primary focus is four-fold: price, convenience, print quality, and ongoing running costs. Aside from a somewhat high per-print cost of operation, we found the Kodak Mini’s price reasonable. The printer itself was very easy to set up and use and the software made preparing and printing photographs a snap.

Read the entire article at Computer Shopper