Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Fast scanning. Excellent optical-character-recognition (OCR) accuracy. Massive input capacity. Supports tabloid-size and larger pages. Robust, easy-to-use software.

  • CONS

    Slow at saving to searchable PDF.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Kodak i3300 is a fast, high-volume document scanner, and it comes with excellent full-featured scanning and processing software at a competitive price.

Positioned between the Editors’ Choice Kodak i3250 and the highly capable Kodak i3500, the Kodak i3300 Scanner ($4,495) is one of Kodak Alaris’ i3000 series of heavy-duty, high-volume document scanners. Like several of its siblings, the i3300 quickly and accurately scans one-and two-sided documents up to tabloid-size (11-by-17 inches) and beyond. Compared with some other document scanners we’ve tested, it’s a bit slow when scanning to searchable PDF, but not enough so to detract from its suitability for midsize-to-large document-management systems. That makes it a highly sensible choice—and our new top pick—as a wide-format high-volume document scanner for large workgroups and medium-size offices.
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Review of the HP DeskJet 2655 All-in-One at Computer ShopperThe other day we stated that, at $59.99, HP’s DeskJet 3755 had the lowest list price of any all-in-one (AIO) printer—inkjet or otherwise—that we’ve reviewed in quite some time. That was before we started looking at today’s review unit, the $49.99-list DeskJet 2655. While all of the major inkjet-printer makers offer at least one model with a list price under $100, the DeskJet 2655’s half-a-C-note price is about as low as it gets.

The DeskJet 2655 and 3755 entry-level AIOs, for all their common features, are dissimilar in several ways. The most glaring difference is that the DeskJet 2655, the lower-cost model, comes with a traditional flatbed scanner, where the sensor travels the length of the page it’s scanning. The DeskJet 3755 deploys a scroll-feed-type scanner that pulls the paper over the scanning sensor.

HP DeskJet 2655 (Right Angled Blue)

Both models use the same ink cartridges, though, so they both hit you for some of the highest running costs in the business—if, that is, you pay full tilt for the official HP ink cartridges on a per-piece basis. But you have an alternative to that, beyond messing with refills or third-party ink tanks. Both the DeskJet 3755 and the 2655 are eligible for HP’s Instant Ink subscription service, making them (if you opt for Instant Ink) downright reasonable in running costs among entry-level printers. The only way to get a lower cost per page from AIOs with similar volume ratings and feature sets? You’ll have to opt for a “bulk-ink” AIO, such as one of Epson’s EcoTank or Canon MegaTank models. (More on those later.) But these machines are pricey by comparison; the idea with these models is, you pay more now to pay less for ink later.

Confused yet? We’ll delve more into the different ink-buying methods (and their prospective benefits) later in this review. Suffice it to say here that, unless you plan to print very little with the DeskJet 2655, you should definitely go with the Instant Ink plan with this printer. And if you plan to print more than, say, between 50 to 200 pages a month, you might want to consider one of the bulk-ink models, or just something other than an entry-level AIO. (A good option is the Brother MFC-J985DW, which, aside from the number of ink cartridges in the box, is identical to—but much less expensive than—the MFC-J985DW XL we reviewed a while back.)

Print speed and output quality are two other important considerations when buying a new AIO printer, entry-level or otherwise. We’re happy to report that the DeskJet 2655’s print quality is, given its price, surprisingly good. Its print speed, on the other hand…well, let’s just say that it’s not the slowest we’ve seen. But then none of the DeskJet 2655’s direct competitors, such as the Epson Expression Home XP-440 Small-in-One, is a speed demon, either.

What you get with the DeskJet 2655 is a low-cost entry-level inkjet AIO designed with very low monthly print and copy volumes in mind. It’s slow, but it prints quite well, and the Instant Ink option tips it as an Editors’ Choice winner and a great pick among under-$60 all-in-one printers. (Mind you, that’s a very small field.)

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Review of the Epson Expression 12000XL-PH at PCMagPROS

  • High-resolution, wide-format scanning. Scans slides, negatives, and transparencies, as well as reflective photos and artwork. Highly accurate color and detail.

  • CONS

    Expensive. Big and heavy. Transparency unit comes uninstalled.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Epson Expression 12000XL-PH is a large, tabloid-size graphics arts and photograph scanner that is compatible with a large array of media and produces excellent output.

The wide-format Epson Expression 12000XL-PH ($3429.99) is the professional photographers’ version of the Expression 12000XL-GA, an oversize professional graphic artists’ flatbed scanner. Essentially, these two machines are the same, except that the PH version comes with a transparency unit for scanning slides, transparencies, and negatives. While you can buy the scanner itself and opt for the transparency unit later, purchasing them together, in the same box, saves you about $130. Either way, its price is substantial for a flatbed scanner, but graphic artists, photographers, and desktop publishers will find the 12000XL-PH a highly accurate and quality tool for digitizing not only slides, transparencies, and film, but also photos and artwork up to tabloid-size (11 by 17 inches).
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  • Review of the Visioneer Patriot H80 document scanner at PCMagPROS

    Very fast scanning and saving to PDF. Above-average OCR accuracy. 10,000-page daily duty cycle. Comprehensive software bundle includes PDF creation and editing and document management software.

  • CONS

    Pricey. Not notably faster than much-less-expensive sibling.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    A remarkably fast workhorse document scanner, the Visioneer Patriot H80 is quicker and more accurate than most of its competitors, including its slightly lower-rated, less-expensive Patriot H60 sibling—but not enough to justify a hefty price difference.

Aside from a higher price and faster scanning speeds, the Visioneer Patriot H80 ($1,595) is identical to the Editors’ Choice Visioneer Patriot H60. Both sheet-feed document scanners have the same daily duty cycles, the same size automatic document feeders (ADFs), and they come with the same software bundle. In addition, both machines are quite fast, even when scanning and saving to searchable PDF. As sheet-feed document scanners go, the Patriot H80 is one of the fastest, and it’s highly accurate, making it well-suited for medium-to-heavy volume scanning in small- or mid-size offices and workgroups, but unless you need all the speed you can possibly get, the huge price difference between it and its less-expensive sibling seems excessive.

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  • Review of the Xerox Duplex Travel Scanner at PCMagPROS

    Exceptional OCR accuracy. Scans two-sided pages in one pass. Robust, easy-to-use software. No power cable required.

  • CONS

    A little slow. Slightly expensive. Requires a PC to operate.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Xerox Duplex Travel Scanner may be a bit sluggish, but it scans two-sided pages in a single pass, and it’s highly accurate, making it a terrific choice for low-volume scanning on the road.

The Xerox Duplex Travel Scanner ($119.99) is similar to the Editors’ Choice Visioneer RoadWarrior X3 in features and functionality, except that the former can scan two-sided documents without you having to turn them over manually. Otherwise, both portable document scanners work without power cables, and they’re both exceptionally easy to use. There are some other much more sophisticated portable document scanners out there, such as the $300 Epson WorkForce ES-300W Portable Wireless Duplex Document Scanner, but if all you need is to scan relatively short documents to your laptop on the road, the Duplex Travel Scanner is a terrific alternative to the RoadWarrior X3—especially if those documents are two-sided.

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  • Review of the Visioneer Patriot H60 at PCMagPROS

    Exceptional optical character recognition (OCR) accuracy. Feature-rich, easy-to-deploy software. Very fast scanning and saving to PDF. 10,000-page daily duty cycle.

  • CONS

    Would be more competitive at a lower price.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Visioneer Patriot H60 scans quickly and accurately, and it has a huge daily duty cycle and a comprehensive software bundle.

With speed ratings similar to the HP ScanJet Enterprise Flow 7000 s3 Sheet-Feed Scanner, a top pick, the Visioneer Patriot H60 ($1,095) scans fast and accurately, and it comes with a significantly higher daily duty cycle. It’s also one of the fastest scanners in this class that PCMag has reviewed recently, especially when saving to searchable PDF, but it costs $200 more than the HP model. It comes with an impressive software bundle that includes Visioneer’s easy-to-use OneTouch scanning interface utility, as well as state-of-the-art optical character recognition (OCR) and document-management programs. In most ways, it outpaces the HP ScanJet 7000, more than enough to compensate for the higher price, making it our Editors’ Choice as a moderate-to-high-volume document scanner for small and medium-size offices and workgroups.

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  • Review of the Kodak ScanMate i1150WN at PCMagPROS

    Robust, easy-to-deploy software. Excellent OCR accuracy. Includes PDF creation and editing and document management software. Supports numerous network and other connectivity modes.

  • CONS

    Somewhat pricy. Slow at saving to searchable PDF.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    The Kodak ScanMate i1150WN is a bit slow for the price, but this scanner comes with numerous network and other connectivity options and terrific software, and OCR accuracy is above average.

The Kodak ScanMate i1150WN ($650) from Kodak Alaris is similar in many ways to its previous iteration, the Kodak ScanMate i1150, except that it supports both wired and wireless networking. It’s not, however, as fast as some network-ready scanners we have reviewed, including the Editors’ Choice Brother ImageCenter ADS-3600W and Epson’s significantly less expensive WorkForce ES-500W Wireless Duplex Document Scanner. Even though the i1150WN is not lickety-split, it’s plenty fast enough for many micro office and workgroup environments, and it comes with slick and easy-to-use software, making it a good choice for low-to-moderate network document scanning, especially for use at the front desk in medical and dental offices.Read entire review at PCMag


 

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Review of the Apparent Doxie Q scanner at PCMagThe Apparent Doxie Q ($299.99), like the IRIScan Anywhere 5, is an uber-portable document scanner that, unlike much of the competition, doesn’t need to be attached to a PC to do its job. The primary differences between the Doxie Q and the Anywhere 5 are that the former comes with an automatic document feeder (ADF), where the latter requires you to feed it manually, one page at a time. On the other hand, the IRIScan model has a much more robust, modern, and complete software bundle, while, in addition to Windows and MacOS, the Doxie Q also provides an app for uploading (and processing) your scans to Apple’s iOS, so you can use it with an iPhone or iPad. The real appeal here is that both allow you to scan virtually anywhere, but the Doxie Q has an ADF and a heartier, replaceable battery so it can scan longer.

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Editors' Choice

  • PROS

    Low price. High daily duty cycle for price. Excellent OCR accuracy. Includes PDF creation and editing and document management software. Large ADF for price.

  • CONS

    Much slower than Xerox’s ratings. Lag time between scanning and saving to searchable PDF is significant.

  • BOTTOM LINE

    For well under the cost of several similarly rated document scanners, the Xerox DocuMate 6440 scans more than fast enough for the price and it’s highly accurate.

Review of the Xerox DocuMate 6440 at PCMagWe’ve reviewed several sheet-feed document scanners with speed ratings above 50 pages per minute (ppm) when scanning in one-sided mode, and over 100 images per minute (ipm) in two-sided mode. But we haven’t tested many with ratings in this range that are comparable in price to the Xerox DocuMate 6440 ($495). In testing, it, like several other similarly rated document scanners, it didn’t come close to Xerox’s published ratings, especially when scanning to searchable PDF. But it does outpace similarly priced models and it scans quite acurately, making it our latest top pick for moderate-to-high-volume scanning in a small office or workgroup.

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Review of the HP ScanJet Pro 4500 fn1 Network Scanner at PCMagThe flagship in HP’s line of flatbed ScanJet Pro document scanners, the 4500 fn1 Network Scanner ($899) is similar in many ways to the ScanJet Pro 3500 f1 Flatbed Scanner. Unlike its less-expensive sibling, though, the 4500 is networkable via both Ethernet and Wi-Fi, scans faster, and has a higher daily duty cycle. It’s also quicker than the Editors’ Choice Canon imageFormula DR-2020U, as well as the comparably priced Epson WorkForce DS-6500—especially when saving scans to searchable PDF files. Fast, single-pass scanning and swift saving to a usable file format, as well as built-in networking, easily elevate the ScanJet Pro 4500 to our Editors’ Choice for a flatbed document scanner for low-to-medium-volume scanning in a small office or workgroup.

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